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    (Original post by Peroxidation)
    I have ADHD and autism. This gives me a significantly reduced processing speed and wrecks my concentration. Without the extra time I'd be severely disadvantaged and wouldn't be able to achieve my true grades. I have an IQ of about 150, so in theory I should be getting consistently high grades right? Wrong. My ADHD and autism means that while I have a high IQ, I can't concentrate and end up failing without extra time. The extra time is there to level the playing field for people like myself. Besides, it's becoming harder and harder to actually get extra time. Now most of the people who have it are disabled. So don't even try claiming that we don't deserve it.
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    I'm not trying to brag here, I'm just using myself as an example.
    This is exactly what I have, but dyslexia and dyspraxia too.

    At my school exams when I went in prepared so I wasn't freaking out I got not just 1's (Scottish system so that would be a A) but 100% in most things.

    I am now in my thirties and the amount of people who assume me to be thick as I have bad posture and stutter a little and look down on me is high despite my actual IQ being high.

    My biggest problem is I have such a bright mind but bad at processing it down so I need focus its why I excelled at college but struggled at university as they wanted more structured content rather than just well researched content,

    Some would say that my lack of concentration and such is just a flaw and thus I can't do any better and therefore extra time or such is being easy on me so people who don't have that problem are just "better" at things and its nothing to do with disability.
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    Exams need to test your KNOWLEDGE and UNDERSTANDING, and NOTHING ELSE.

    If you understand and know the subject content you should be doing well because of that. You shouldn't be penalized for not being quick enough to express your knowledge.
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    (Original post by _JJ)
    Exams need to test your KNOWLEDGE and UNDERSTANDING, and NOTHING ELSE.

    If you understand and know the subject content you should be doing well because of that. You shouldn't be penalized for not being quick enough to express your knowledge.
    UNDERSTANDING.
    So if people take longer to understand what the question is asking of them that is their weak area but they shouldn't be given extra time as that is what exams are all about. Lol.
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    I have a severe visual impairment so I get extra time in my exams and there's no way I would finish without it. Those saying that extra time isn't necessary if we had a large print paper, that's not true. It takes me so much longer to read everything as it's not like I can just skim over it I have to use a magnifying glass as glasses don't help with my condition and that severely slows me down. I also get really tired because it's a strain on my eyes so I see the time as vital. I understand things and I think it would be unfair to put people with disabilities at a disadvantage by having them do an exam in a time limit that's physically impossible for them through no fault of their own. Also I know that it doesn't put me at an advantage because I always ask my friends how much they wrote and I almost always write the same or less. I know it's hard to understand some disabilities on the surface but please try and think about any underlying difficulties it may cause people!
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    This post has really proved how ignorant people can be. Even if the system is abused, it is incredibly difficult to falsely get extra time as a lot of those who do have disabilities, hence they have proof that they are not lying.
    How can people expect those with disabilities to be as capable as them in exams when it comes to timing. Surely a physical disability would prevent a person from being able to write at the same speed as someone who does not have a condition? Or they may not even be able to write at all so may have to verbally tell an examiner or assistant their answers to questions and have them write it down.
    Please put yourself in the position of people in those circumstances and then see if you think the same.
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    (Original post by Chmbiogeog)
    UNDERSTANDING.
    So if people take longer to understand what the question is asking of them that is their weak area but they shouldn't be given extra time as that is what exams are all about. Lol.
    Those with learning difficulties are likely to take longer to process their thoughts and gain understanding, it doesn't mean they can't understand at all.
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    No people shouldn't get extra time, people should be allowed to do the exams in alternative conditions to help with certain difficulties(just like an employer might do like using a laptop instead of writing on paper) but they shouldn't be given extra time.The reason for this is very simply why would an employer employ someone who produces less work in their 9-5 working hours compared to someone else who produce more work assuming that both people produce the same quality?This isn't some sort of discrimination if a disabled person(with any specific arrangements than I can make possible) can't produce work in the same amount of time and quality as a normal worker then I wouldn't employ them.

    I have seen people posting how they need extra time because they take longer to process information but exams are timed and this means part of the assessment is based around how fast people can process information and answer questions so since this ability is tested on the exam then why are people who are bad at this given extra time?A lot of these disabilities are really just saying these people are bad at this skill or another and thus they should lose marks as a result.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    No people shouldn't get extra time, people should be allowed to do the exams in alternative conditions to help with certain difficulties(just like an employer might do like using a laptop instead of writing on paper) but they shouldn't be given extra time.The reason for this is very simply why would an employer employ someone who produces less work in their 9-5 working hours compared to someone else who produce more work assuming that both people produce the same quality?This isn't some sort of discrimination if a disabled person(with any specific arrangements than I can make possible) can't produce work in the same amount of time and quality as a normal worker then I wouldn't employ them.

    I have seen people posting how they need extra time because they take longer to process information but exams are timed and this means part of the assessment is based around how fast people can process information and answer questions so since this ability is tested on the exam then why are people who are bad at this given extra time?A lot of these disabilities are really just saying these people are bad at this skill or another and thus they should lose marks as a result.
    That's so true! I totally agree with you!
    If you can't write quick enough, learn to write quicker like EVERYONE else has to do and whom do not have extra time!
    Unis also see if you have extra time for your a levels etc. which i wouldnt say is a good thing..
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    (Original post by OturuDansay)
    That's so true! I totally agree with you!
    If you can't write quick enough, learn to write quicker like EVERYONE else has to do and whom do not have extra time!
    Unis also see if you have extra time for your a levels etc. which i wouldnt say is a good thing..
    Agree with both of you
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    Okay....Korea has a literacy rate of 98%, one of the highest in the world. This is because they are so disciplined and they have the correct teaching methods; I don't think many people will have "Dyslexia" there...And if they do have "learning disabilities" they work very hard to overcome them. Being labeled with one of these "learning disabilities" is cruel; it makes people lazy and slower than what they were before being "diagnosed".
    Apparently "dyslexia" came about due to middle-class parents having to make up an excuse for why there child is not as smart as the next one...
    I'm not talking about physcial difficulties because that's a different matter.
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    (Original post by OturuDansay)
    Okay....Korea has a literacy rate of 98%, one of the highest in the world. This is because they are so disciplined and they have the correct teaching methods; I don't think many people will have "Dyslexia" there...And if they do have "learning disabilities" they work very hard to overcome them. Being labeled with one of these "learning disabilities" is cruel; it makes people lazy and slower than what they were before being "diagnosed".
    Apparently "dyslexia" came about due to middle-class parents having to make up an excuse for why there child is not as smart as the next one...
    I'm not talking about physcial difficulties because that's a different matter.
    While I accept your point bout laziness as I have seen it happen, the ignorance in this post astronomical. Many people with SpLD's do work very hard to overcome them. Personally I have severe Specific Learning Differences so my extra time allowance if often bigger than that for other people with Dyslexia. However, I am far from lazy. I learnt to read on time.I went to secondary school with my peer group despite spending the last year of primary in hospital mostly. I left school with my peers obtaining A levels significantly above average despite mental health problems in my final year. I had to work significantly harder than many of my peers here. I am only now a year behind by my own choice as I knew I could achieve a bit better. My best friend who has moderate SpLD,s just graduated with a 1st from St Andrews for her Intercalated BSc. Now whilst I give you that the label dyslexia is pretty useless as it is now used too liberally- the statistical methods for Identifying SpLD's are robust. I have had no less than 3 independent assessments and all corroborated my cognitive profile to a high degree of accuracy. Maximum variance of 4 standard scores on IQ scale, which is very small. The bit about middle class parents is a myth. I also think that the line between Physical difficulties and learning differences may not be a clearly defined as you would hope. The other place I would disagree is that the labels are cruel, the label of an SpLD is not cruel. What is cruel and misleading is the societal attitude that disability is interchangeable with inability. Hence someone being disabled means they can not do something- therefore label results in laziness. However change that attained to label gives us a piece of information about ourselves. Hence now what can we do to improve it.
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    (Original post by OturuDansay)
    That's so true! I totally agree with you!
    If you can't write quick enough, learn to write quicker like EVERYONE else has to do and whom do not have extra time!
    Unis also see if you have extra time for your a levels etc. which i wouldnt say is a good thing..
    Unis do not see if you have extra time or not, his information is protected by the Data Protection Act. Only JCQ +/- the exam board know dependant on the percentage. There are not legally and do not release this information.
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    Of course it's fair. We're not all born the same and it's our individuality which is what sets us apart. Extra time in some cases is essential due to the underlying medical condition of the student. Of course some students unfairly claim it, but if we were to ban it, a dangerous precedent whereby those with legitimate need would be denied.

    If there is some great panacea to cure us all from every condition to make us all the same, throw it away. Our individuality defines us and it's one of the reasons I went into medicine: to see people of all types, ethnicities, ages etc. Many of my peers have extra time and frankly, if I've done my revision and worked hard I don't care if they get more time or not because at the end of the day you get a grade, try to make it the one you want because of YOUR effort YOU put in.
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    (Original post by Midgeymoo17)
    While I accept your point bout laziness as I have seen it happen, the ignorance in this post astronomical. Many people with SpLD's do work very hard to overcome them. Personally I have severe Specific Learning Differences so my extra time allowance if often bigger than that for other people with Dyslexia. However, I am far from lazy. I learnt to read on time.I went to secondary school with my peer group despite spending the last year of primary in hospital mostly. I left school with my peers obtaining A levels significantly above average despite mental health problems in my final year. I had to work significantly harder than many of my peers here. I am only now a year behind by my own choice as I knew I could achieve a bit better. My best friend who has moderate SpLD,s just graduated with a 1st from St Andrews for her Intercalated BSc. Now whilst I give you that the label dyslexia is pretty useless as it is now used too liberally- the statistical methods for Identifying SpLD's are robust. I have had no less than 3 independent assessments and all corroborated my cognitive profile to a high degree of accuracy. Maximum variance of 4 standard scores on IQ scale, which is very small. The bit about middle class parents is a myth. I also think that the line between Physical difficulties and learning differences may not be a clearly defined as you would hope. The other place I would disagree is that the labels are cruel, the label of an SpLD is not cruel. What is cruel and misleading is the societal attitude that disability is interchangeable with inability. Hence someone being disabled means they can not do something- therefore label results in laziness. However change that attained to label gives us a piece of information about ourselves. Hence now what can we do to improve it.
    This is often because thats exactly what it is Definition of Dyslexia from Google:"a general term for disorders that involve difficulty in learning to read or interpret words, letters, and other symbols, but that do not affect general intelligence."Difficulty in doing something=low intelligence in that area so from this we can conclude dyslexics literally are dumb at reading but have normal intelligence apart from reading.What also confuses me is why these need more treatment and help than those who are generally just bad at reading and everything else as well how is it fair on them?

    Studies have also shown that it is caused by defects in brain processing which is just simply more evidence that it means low intelligence in reading.
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    I know of someone (ex-friend) who purposely messed up their handwriting and wrote slowly making sure it is in no way eligible and then saying to teachers I am worried I will lose grades because of this. He got a laptop and extra time and is now smashing it. I am not one of these envious people but hes not that smart and is not disable but 100% benefits from this. I know of someone in my school who genuinely writes really really slow in our school but the teachers don't like him IMO he would be deserving of extra time but then again that shows fault of him not being technical. I myself think I would improve from B's to A*'s if I had extra time. How does one apply for extra-time though?
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    It's totally fair. As someone going through GCSE's i can easily see why people think its not - they get bitter after bad exam experiences/ hearing people who cheated to get it. Fine, it does get abused sometimes; but they are pretty good nowadays. To be honest teh extra time would not have helped me in any of my GCSE's so I can look from a less biased point of view. People who get extra time deserve and need it - so they should get it.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    No people shouldn't get extra time, people should be allowed to do the exams in alternative conditions to help with certain difficulties(just like an employer might do like using a laptop instead of writing on paper) but they shouldn't be given extra time.The reason for this is very simply why would an employer employ someone who produces less work in their 9-5 working hours compared to someone else who produce more work assuming that both people produce the same quality?This isn't some sort of discrimination if a disabled person(with any specific arrangements than I can make possible) can't produce work in the same amount of time and quality as a normal worker then I wouldn't employ them.

    I have seen people posting how they need extra time because they take longer to process information but exams are timed and this means part of the assessment is based around how fast people can process information and answer questions so since this ability is tested on the exam then why are people who are bad at this given extra time?A lot of these disabilities are really just saying these people are bad at this skill or another and thus they should lose marks as a result.
    I have ADD and severe slow processing. This means it takes me longer to write, harder to concentrate for a long period of time on one thing and basically longer to transfer knowledge from brain to paper which is a side effect of having mild cerebral palsy. This was diagnosed two months into year 13. Throughout my GCSE's and AS's, teachers were completely puzzled as to why I was getting C's, D's and E's despite having a high IQ and getting top grades in untimed questions. For example, in my ICT paper, we were given 2 hours and 15 minutes (plenty for an 80 mark paper), and the questions were fairly short, I finished on time and achieved an A, however, on my politics paper, a mark a minute, a missed out a 40 mark question because I didn't have time to finish it, yet I achieved nearly full marks in the questions I did complete resulting in low grades. Does this mean I am any less intelligent than the person who completed the paper within the time frame?

    I now have 50% extra time in my exams, this doesn't give me an advantage believe me, it puts me at the same level as the reasonably competent student and allows me to get the grades that I am capable of. I get why people don't think that extra time is fair, but how frustrated would you be if you spent months revising for exams that you were well capable of acing only to be stopped half way through.

    I find that the 'work life' argument is rather weak. Yes we are all given deadlines to some extent, but how often are employees sat down and told to reproduce a year or two's worth of revision in a tight time frame? It cost my parents £400 to 'diagnose' me which is there to try and deter students from abusing the system (although I am aware it still happens) and my mother was also diagnosed despite being in her 50's with a six figure salary so there is a prime example of how unrealistic your argument is.

    So, to entertain your point of view, maybe a career based on strict deadlines and high concentration for long periods of time isn't for me,but guess what, theres thousands of careers out there and I'll choose one that suits my working style, however education in this country does't work like that and considering I applied to russell group universities, I gathered A-Levels would be the most realistic option.

    Standardised testing has it's flaws and with my conditions, I suffer as a result of those flaws. Extra time shouldn't be awarded to those who don't need it, that is a kick in the face to me and those who work incredibly hard to finish in the snappy time frames. However, the ignorance about extra time is appalling, and maybe you ought to face the realisation that standardised testing is the problem and not extra time. Shouldn't exams be about knowledge rather than speed of completing the exam?
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    This is often because thats exactly what it is Definition of Dyslexia from Google:"a general term for disorders that involve difficulty in learning to read or interpret words, letters, and other symbols, but that do not affect general intelligence."Difficulty in doing something=low intelligence in that area so from this we can conclude dyslexics literally are dumb at reading but have normal intelligence apart from reading.What also confuses me is why these need more treatment and help than those who are generally just bad at reading and everything else as well how is it fair on them?

    Studies have also shown that it is caused by defects in brain processing which is just simply more evidence that it means low intelligence in reading.
    This is actually only in part true. Yes processing speed is a cognitive skill, therefore some one with a slow processing speed would normally have a lower IQ than someone with an otherwise identical cognitive profile. However it is only part of the cognitive profile which makes up intelligence. If someones whole profile suggested below average intelligence then extra time is not actually awarded. Yes I have seen someone go to a private Ed Psych deliberately do below average on everything for the Ed Pysch then to write extra time not recommended as no specific difficulty exists this person is just stupid. I will not deny that my slow processing speed (its very slow) does pose its challenges to everything because any piece of information presented needs processing. But taking from my experience in Mathematics whilst I was the slowest to learn/ understand material and needed longer to process the meaning of questions I could often answer questions that most others can not because once I had got my head round the material and question my mastery of the material was far greater (with a numerical manipulation score in the top 5 % of adults). Why should my performance in Maths not adequately be reflected because I had to get past the poorly worded stats question? Here I would predict the categoric counter argument argument that you would not get extra time in the work place- this maybe true but as human beings we tend to gravitate to the jobs that utilise our strengths otherwise one is unlikely to enjoy the job. A such it is highly unlikely you will find someone like me working as a senior emergency room doctor. More likely would work as doctor who reports X-Rays and MRI's where being slow and methodical utilising the patience I will have developed by being a slow processor would serve me well. Hence removing the need for a reasonable adjustment as the adjustment would be inherent in the requirements of the occupation.
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    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    This is often because thats exactly what it is Definition of Dyslexia from Google:"a general term for disorders that involve difficulty in learning to read or interpret words, letters, and other symbols, but that do not affect general intelligence."Difficulty in doing something=low intelligence in that area so from this we can conclude dyslexics literally are dumb at reading but have normal intelligence apart from reading.What also confuses me is why these need more treatment and help than those who are generally just bad at reading and everything else as well how is it fair on them?

    Studies have also shown that it is caused by defects in brain processing which is just simply more evidence that it means low intelligence in reading.
    And you believe everything you read on Gogle?
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    I know my friend gets 20 minutes extra time because she broke her hand seriously a few months ago, and after physical therapy and what not, the doctor said her hand wasn't strong enough yet to handle the quick writing she'd need, specifically for the essay-based subjects. I don't mind people getting extra-time, if they generally do need it eg. dyslexia and other learning difficulties, or general diagnosed disabilities...
 
 
 
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