Edexcel Government & Politics - Unit 2 Governing the UK (09/06/16)

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    (Original post by Student 1305)
    Omg you're an amazing human being thank you so much!! I wish I could be of more help! The only thing I've noticed is that since 2009, the topics have always been in sets (Constitution and Parliament / Judiciary and Pm&Cabinet). So: if Constitution is a source then Parliament is an essay question and vice versa. Same applies to Judiciary and Pm&Cabinet Hope that was of any use!
    Thank you very much. No problem, I hope you do well in Unit 2 once again!
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    (Original post by alevelpain)
    Then evaluate that and say then the mandate weakens b/c such a long time
    Okay awesome everyone helping everyone with essay plans and giving improvements is really helpful!


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    (Original post by jxssamy)
    How would you separate the constitutional strengths of uncodified and unentrenched into 2 different points??
    It's uncodified and has a variety of sources (such as ..... Give examples). This is different to codified constitutions like the US constitution which is compiled into a single document, separated by articles (plus the Bill of Rights). The uncodified nature of the U.K. Constitution is considered a strength by many Conservatives as it shows the organic development of our country over the years, composing of historical documents like the Magna Carta and input from credited political philosophers like Dicey. This therefore credits the reliability of our constitution.

    The fact that the UK constitution is not entrenched is a strength due to Parliament's ability to quickly pass legislation in times of potential crisis and in the national interest. For example, the Dunblane school massacre led to legislation being passed shortly after the event which restricted access to handguns. This contrasts with the US, where amendments to their constitution require a 2/3 supermajority in Congress. This meant that, despite Obama pledging to pressure Congress to change the Second Amendment after the Sandy Hook shooting, nothing has yet been done. In light of this, the lack of entrenchment in the UK constitution can be seen as a strength because changes can be made by a single Act of Parliament.


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    (Original post by Anonymous789)
    hey do you remember what the 5 and 10 markers were for that section?? what is on the functions of pressure groups or something?? i dont think i done it correctly. plus i missed an entire 25 marker due to timing
    Hi!

    I think the 5 marker was on the functions of pressure groups and the 10 marker was three reasons why pressure groups might resort to illegal action.


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    Can someone list all the potential/past 40 markers for Constitution? thanks
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    (Original post by Louise12307)
    It's uncodified and has a variety of sources (such as ..... Give examples). This is different to codified constitutions like the US constitution which is compiled into a single document, separated by articles (plus the Bill of Rights). The uncodified nature of the U.K. Constitution is considered a strength by many Conservatives as it shows the organic development of our country over the years, composing of historical documents like the Magna Carta and input from credited political philosophers like Dicey. This therefore credits the reliability of our constitution.

    The fact that the UK constitution is not entrenched is a strength due to Parliament's ability to quickly pass legislation in times of potential crisis and in the national interest. For example, the Dunblane school massacre led to legislation being passed shortly after the event which restricted access to handguns. This contrasts with the US, where amendments to their constitution require a 2/3 supermajority in Congress. This meant that, despite Obama pledging to pressure Congress to change the Second Amendment after the Sandy Hook shooting, nothing has yet been done. In light of this, the lack of entrenchment in the UK constitution can be seen as a strength because changes can be made by a single Act of Parliament.


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    This is perfect, thank you v v v v v much
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    (Original post by Louise12307)
    Hi!

    I think the 5 marker was on the functions of pressure groups and the 10 marker was three reasons why pressure groups might resort to illegal action.


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    yes ur right thanks. and for the five marker it wouldnt be correct to mention the two types of pressure groups would it. i mentioned quite a lot for it. i remember mentioning sectional and promotional groups and what they do with examples like the confederation of british industry and explaining what it does etc but they wouldnt be considered functions would they??
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    Does anyone think for the judiciary it will be to what extent should Britain have a bill of rights?

    Also does anyone have any arguements for and against a bill of rights? Thanks
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    How would you answer: "Analyse the main factors that limit the effectiveness of Parliament."
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    (Original post by dmy15)
    Can someone list all the potential/past 40 markers for Constitution? thanks
    Arguments for and against codification/is our constitution relevant?
    Where has sovereignty gone/ to what extent has the location of sovereignty changed in the uk/is parliament still sovereign
    How effectively does the uk constitution limit the power of government
    Constitutional reforms: have they been successful or failures? Are the reforms relevant?


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    (Original post by guppal21)
    How would you answer: "Analyse the main factors that limit the effectiveness of Parliament."
    Talk about its functions and their limitations


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    (Original post by hw1221)
    Does anyone think for the judiciary it will be to what extent should Britain have a bill of rights?

    Also does anyone have any arguements for and against a bill of rights? Thanks
    I deffo think it might come up but I can't give you a plan as I'm not taking judiciary sorry haha


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    Anyone got some judiciary essay plans or notes? Really struggling with all this So nervous haha
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    Here is my plan for a 40marker PM and Cabinet question hope it helps!!! Sorry the layout is a it weird
    PATRONAGE:
    Too powerful:
    * PMhas appointed powers of patronage
    * Patronage: power of an individual to appoint someone into an important position
    * Theseare not available to other cabinet ministers
    * Themost significant is the power to appoint governmentministers
    * The2012 reshuffle highlighted how vulnerable ministers can be if their departmentsare not achieving positive media coverage and public approval, or if theminister’s view conflicts with the majority of the government. Ministers such as Andrew Lansley who have been deemedunsuccessful, have often been replaced.
    Not too powerful:
    * Judicial and Ecclesiastical Appointments – the PM’s role in appointing judgesand senior members of the Church of England was reduced by the Brown governmentin the Constitutional Reforms Act (2005).The PM plays no role in judicial appointments and is only given one name toapprove for ecclesiastical appointments.
    * Whenthere is a coalition, the PM does not have thecomplete right to appoint whoever he/she wants. DeputyPrime Minister Nick Clegg appointed 5 of the 23 cabinet members.
    * Even in a majority government, the PM does not have the completecontrol over appointments. 2012 reshuffle-reported that the PM wanted Iain DuncanSmith to move from Work and Pension to a new post as Justice Secretary. Themedia claimed that Smith was reluctant to leave his post, and he wanted tocontinue his welfare reforms. Due to the fact that Smith is a former leader ofthe Conservative party, and his welfare reforms were popular with members,Cameron was forced to accept his refusal.
    AGENDA SETTINGToo powerful:
    * PMcan determine the agenda of cabinet meetings by:controlling the information presented to ministers by choosing whichissues should be brought before cabinet and keepingpotentially difficult issues off the cabinet agenda by dealing with themin committee or bilateral meetings
    * Can establish committees to examine issues that the PM wants topromote but cannot control all aspects of decision making at this level
    * Canalso reshape the structure of centralgovernment * Theycan also use agenda setting to suit their ownvision
    Not too powerful:
    * Backbencher rebellions undermine his position
    * Althoughthe Marriage Bill passed in 2013, allowing same sexmarriage, 136 Conservative MPS voted against it
    * Althoughit was a free vote, the number of backbenchMPs who opposed their leader could show how theparty is not united over his visions
    * The current Parliament have been one of the mostrebellious in history. From May 2013 to May 2014, Conservative MPS rebelled in 24% of motions
    PUBLIC STANDING
    Too powerful:
    * High opinion poll ratings strengthen the PM’s position: a PM is regardedas a strong and effective leader has much greater authority than one perceivedas weak or out of touch* PMprovides political leadership at home andrepresents the UK in international affairs* Hasregular discussions with other world leaders andattends formal meetings of head of government, such as EuropeanUnion summits* PMhas taken on the role of communicator-in-chief forthe government, articulating its policy programme and objectives

    Not too power:
    * Politicalpower can be limited in coalitions or minoritygovernments as their political powers and personal powers are reduced asthey have to keep their own backbenchers happy and the coalition government.
    * Political power: actual support and responsiveness of the PM’s party
    * Personal power: individual powers of persuasion and leadership
    * Thatcher became associated with unpopular policies, like PollTax, and was viewed as an autocrat
    * Blair’s opinion poll reduced due to the war in Iraq
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    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    Yeah you could definitely argue it needs reforming if its functions are/aren't being carried out properly , do you know the limited reforms for the hoc that have already taken place?


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    Erin fixed term parliament act weakining the PM
    Freedom of information act - maybe acts as a deterrent for politicians to behave properly as they have to be more accountable to the public

    Anymore?
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    (Original post by sampowellwales)
    Anyone got some judiciary essay plans or notes? Really struggling with all this So nervous haha
    Yup I have these,
    Attached Files
  1. File Type: docx Judicary.docx (16.6 KB, 26 views)
  2. File Type: docx judicary notes.docx (25.2 KB, 27 views)
  3. File Type: docx judiciary essay plans from MMR.docx (142.8 KB, 30 views)
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    (Original post by xxvine)
    Erin fixed term parliament act weakining the PM
    Freedom of information act - maybe acts as a deterrent for politicians to behave properly as they have to be more accountable to the public

    Anymore?
    Chairs of select committed additional salary: improve it by increasing the salary, the chairs elected by backbench MPs so that they are not longer biased as they used to be appointed by the pm
    The plan to reduce 650 MPs down to 600: by equalising constituency- gerrymandering!!!
    Recall: unsatisfactory mp could be removed if local citizens can gather a petition to call a by-election and if the mp in question loses such by election
    Could argue e-petitions too


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    [QUOTE=mollyadtr;65534897]Talk about its functions and their limitations

    Ah thank u so much! I knoww the functions but I can't think of any limitations rn?
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    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    Chairs of select committed additional salary: improve it by increasing the salary, the chairs elected by backbench MPs so that they are not longer biased as they used to be appointed by the pm
    The plan to reduce 650 MPs down to 600: by equalising constituency- gerrymandering!!!
    Recall: unsatisfactory mp could be removed if local citizens can gather a petition to call a by-election and if the mp in question loses such by election
    Could argue e-petitions too


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    Your like a politics dictionary lol
    The 600 MPs thing was part of the Tory manifesto
    Has it actually been passed?
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    [QUOTE=guppal21;65535215]
    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    Talk about its functions and their limitations

    Ah thank u so much! I knoww the functions but I can't think of any limitations rn?
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    Sorry I'm way too lazy to type stuff out 😂
    One more I couldn't fit in as the limit is 10...hol limitations:
    Delaying limitations:
    The parliament act limited this power to one year
    Amending limitations:
    Proposed lords amendments must be approved by the hoc, where government dominates so more likely to get a majority pass



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