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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    I find it quite interesting how some unis just use a simple pass/fail/merit/distinction method when others like yours give you degree classifications and others give grades as in A Level. Its all so fascinating really....aaaaand I'm clearly getting well excited over something way too trivial. :emo:
    The first two years at George's are accumulative and the top 7.5% get Medical Sciences (Distinction) and the top 20% get Medical Sciences (Merit).

    I want to rape these last exams but I'm bricking it.
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    My 2 cents...

    Peninsula's teaching methods really do work. Coming to the end of my 5 years this week and wondering how I would have ever managed without this teaching style. Early clinical exposure and the spiral curriculum were the best parts of it in my opinion, so don't be too sceptical of the change
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    Random epiphany just now - have the guys over at UEA always been "Norwich Medical School"?? :confused:

    :holmes:
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    (Original post by Smile88egc)
    My 2 cents...

    Peninsula's teaching methods really do work. Coming to the end of my 5 years this week and wondering how I would have ever managed without this teaching style. Early clinical exposure and the spiral curriculum were the best parts of it in my opinion, so don't be too sceptical of the change
    I am not anti change because it is change, but the UCL curriculum has worked and turned out good doctors for years and years, whereas the Peninsula method has only just had its first few batches - I'm just not sure you need to radically change something that is working. The students don't want it, alot of the consultants don't want it - they say we get loaded with PDS and cuddly social/communication type stuff before we've learned medicine and how to help patients through diagnosis and treatment...a case in point would be all the PDS ethics and law through the first 2 years, my memories are that whenever the discussion got really interesting, ie off prescribed topic, we er ran out of time. Add to that the fact that all we needed to know which took weeks and weeks of sessions was summerised in an hour - it does make me wonder how much of it is necessary.
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    Barts have a spiral curriculum too which means you revisit systems throughout both years on the pre-clinical course and atleast once more on the clinical course. You in essence touch on old stuff from first year in second year and build on it. Kinda works.

    I met with the external examiners last week to talk about our exams and assessments ad stuff and one of them was from PMS. She was really nice actually and mentioned some things that Peninsula shared in common with the Barts teaching system. The lady from Georges also did this. It is surprising how similar bits of our courses are.
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    Barts have a spiral curriculum too which means you revisit systems throughout both years on the pre-clinical course and atleast once more on the clinical course. You in essence touch on old stuff from first year in second year and build on it. Kinda works.

    I met with the external examiners last week to talk about our exams and assessments ad stuff and one of them was from PMS. She was really nice actually and mentioned some things that Peninsula shared in common with the Barts teaching system. The lady from Georges also did this. It is surprising how similar bits of our courses are.
    Styles of Teaching and examination that work well, almost always get rolled out across the field. Its only what we would expect.
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    (Original post by i'm no superman)
    The first two years at George's are accumulative and the top 7.5% get Medical Sciences (Distinction) and the top 20% get Medical Sciences (Merit).

    I want to rape these last exams but I'm bricking it.
    Top 7.5%!!

    With such a small year group it must be pretty damn tough to get one. :s

    You rape these exams anyhow you want to mister! :p:
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    I am not anti change because it is change, but the UCL curriculum has worked and turned out good doctors for years and years, whereas the Peninsula method has only just had its first few batches - I'm just not sure you need to radically change something that is working. The students don't want it, alot of the consultants don't want it - they say we get loaded with PDS and cuddly social/communication type stuff before we've learned medicine and how to help patients through diagnosis and treatment...a case in point would be all the PDS ethics and law through the first 2 years, my memories are that whenever the discussion got really interesting, ie off prescribed topic, we er ran out of time. Add to that the fact that all we needed to know which took weeks and weeks of sessions was summerised in an hour - it does make me wonder how much of it is necessary.
    Just because something has worked does not mean that it will continue to work as the NHS and Medicine in general evolve. It is the responsibly of medical education to move forwards and adapt to an adapting NHS and to an evolving medical field.

    Medical Education should always follow the evidence not tradition, the same way the Medical field follows the evidence. This is the era of evidence-based medicine and medical education.
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    (Original post by carcinoma)
    Styles of Teaching and examination that work well, almost always get rolled out across the field. Its only what we would expect.
    Yeah I agree - that's really good thing! It's only natural to want to pick up good practices from some medical schools to bring back to yours and to also go "oh, we'd never want to do that here" about the bad stuff.
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    (Original post by Blatant Troll)
    Random epiphany just now - have the guys over at UEA always been "Norwich Medical School"?? :confused:

    :holmes:
    No. We changed about a month or so ago :moon:

    To be fair when I greet patients I say "a first year medical student at the University of East Anglia" rather than "from Norwich Medical School"

    Although how do you know what our new name is? :hmmm:
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    Well done!!!

    I find it quite interesting how some unis just use a simple pass/fail/merit/distinction method when others like yours give you degree classifications and others give grades as in A Level. Its all so fascinating really....aaaaand I'm clearly getting well excited over something way too trivial. :emo:
    They don't really give us classifications at this stage, but because of the BMedSci that's how we all think about our grades.






    On a more anal note, I calculated my weighted average as 72%. Dragged down a bit because my two worst marks were in the two 20 credit modules.
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    (Original post by carcinoma)
    Just because something has worked does not mean that it will continue to work as the NHS and Medicine in general evolve. It is the responsibly of medical education to move forwards and adapt to an adapting NHS and to an evolving medical field.

    Medical Education should always follow the evidence not tradition, the same way the Medical field follows the evidence. This is the era of evidence-based medicine and medical education.
    Now I think this might be in some degree pride towards my medical school...

    Where is the evidence to show that Peninsula's teaching methods are objectively better? After all, as we both know, trials of new things can go either way, and the sample size of Peninsula is small compared to other courses.

    All this talk of evolution - medicine and medical practice do not change that quickly, after all, the 'traditional' unis still turn out good doctors, yes? In some ways all medical education is spiral - because it has to be cummilative.

    Show me the evidence, otherwise this is like having a discussion with an infection control poster.
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    (Original post by carcinoma)
    Just because something has worked does not mean that it will continue to work as the NHS and Medicine in general evolve. It is the responsibly of medical education to move forwards and adapt to an adapting NHS and to an evolving medical field.

    Medical Education should always follow the evidence not tradition, the same way the Medical field follows the evidence. This is the era of evidence-based medicine and medical education.
    I think you should be doing my iBSc for me! :p:
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    Yeah I agree - that's really good thing! It's only natural to want to pick up good practices from some medical schools to bring back to yours and to also go "oh, we'd never want to do that here" about the bad stuff.
    See I've noticed a gradual creep toward MCQs from essay type questions, and then we moved onto computer based marking. The cynical part of me says that financial considerations must also have a finger in the pie - after all, automated computer marking using computer rooms the university already has is probably cheaper than having examiners and external examiners mark and moderate 300 odd essay type papers....

    Now I'm not saying standards drop because of SBA questions - they are *******ly hard, but I think essays are good in a way because you have to plan and think logically from scratch, and you can elaborate on why you think what you do. I just think there are also other considerations that may not be so medically innovative as finanically astute. Of course, finances in the current enviroment are scarce, so everything has to be considered carefully, but it might be worth factoring this into discussions.
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    Now I think this might be in some degree pride towards my medical school...

    Where is the evidence to show that Peninsula's teaching methods are objectively better? After all, as we both know, trials of new things can go either way, and the sample size of Peninsula is small compared to other courses.

    All this talk of evolution - medicine and medical practice do not change that quickly, after all, the 'traditional' unis still turn out good doctors, yes? In some ways all medical education is spiral - because it has to be cummilative.

    Show me the evidence, otherwise this is like having a discussion with an infection control poster.
    At no point did i deny that traditional courses produce good doctors, but to say that the traditional medical schools have not adapted would also be wrong.

    At no point have i stated that the methods used by Peninsula are objectively better or worse than any other medical school.


    Here is Peninsula's rationale over why ISCE is better than OSCE
    Attached Images
  1. File Type: pdfBMBS ISCE Evidence Base.pdf (16.1 KB, 651 views)
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    See I've noticed a gradual creep toward MCQs from essay type questions, and then we moved onto computer based marking. The cynical part of me says that financial considerations must also have a finger in the pie - after all, automated computer marking using computer rooms the university already has is probably cheaper than having examiners and external examiners mark and moderate 300 odd essay type papers....

    Now I'm not saying standards drop because of SBA questions - they are *******ly hard, but I think essays are good in a way because you have to plan and think logically from scratch, and you can elaborate on why you think what you do. I just think there are also other considerations that may not be so medically innovative as finanically astute. Of course, finances in the current enviroment are scarce, so everything has to be considered carefully, but it might be worth factoring this into discussions.
    The preclinical course here is also gradually shifting from EMQs to SBAs and computer based exams (not sure if there were ever essay questions as part of the pre-clin course) - SBAs were just suddenly introduced into second year this year and we didn't have them in year one whereas the current freshers did from day 1. They are probably easier to mark and write and that could be why they are shifting towards them. That said, I do think MCQs<EMQs<SBAs<Essays at assessing your knowledge.

    Essays are definitely a better way of assessing IMO. They do make you think a lot more rather than learning by word association which can be the case with EMQs/MCQs/SBAs. Totally agree with you on that front. That said, they are generally more stressful for students and do take a long time to mark and turn them over, so yeah, I also agree that medical schools are probably taking their finances into account which is fair enough. Whether or not they should bring essays back - erm, no. Especially if I'm still a medical student by the time they decide to. :p:
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    Haha. I think the Barts lot are a little bit too excited with the latest league tables. LOL. This is what our homepage looks like! Haha.

    It's in frikkin font size 50 or whatever for everyone to see! :lol:

    EDIT:
    And its even on the "What can you study here" link!! :rofl:
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    Keele shining ahead as usual...
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    No. We changed about a month or so ago :moon:

    To be fair when I greet patients I say "a first year medical student at the University of East Anglia" rather than "from Norwich Medical School"

    Although how do you know what our new name is? :hmmm:
    Was just having a nosey comparing websites curricula as standard - admittedly prompted by all this 'Peninsula deserves a medal' talk - and Norwich Medical School just lept off the page...

    Thanks for enlightening me. Out of interest which name do you prefer? Or does it not make a jot of difference?
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    i refuse to believe that keele's student satisfaction is joint second lowest in the uk
 
 
 
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