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    On a slightly unrelated note I can't frickin' wait for Sonisphere in a few weeks time. Slightly excited.
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    (Original post by Mushi_master)
    Depends really - neuro (inc. psych stuff) was 8 weeks, whereas cardiovasc was about 4 weeks, and renal around 2. Felt like each system was covered thoroughly in that time.

    How exactly does it work covering each one twice? I'm guessing different topics related to it each year.
    Year one is basic a&p based mostly around normal function, with a few core common diseases thrown in (e.g - Cardio - Hypertension, Resp - Asthma and COPd, Renal - UTI, Neruro - Stroke... ect)

    Year two is more detailed a&p and based more around pathology and disease with more diseases on each system. ( Obs - HIV/AIDS, Neuro - meningitis ect)

    Covered in a "life cycle" format but it is still pretty much "systems based".

    Although two weeks for a system does feel a little like an overload but you quickly learn to leave things out in year one, otherwise you would go insane. And on the revisit everything in that system looks so familiar, so building on the more complicated concepts is much much easier.
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    I'm now Dr Hygeia :eek:
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    (Original post by Hygeia)
    I'm now Dr Hygeia :eek:
    Congratulations! YAAAAAAAAY
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    (Original post by Hygeia)
    I'm now Dr Hygeia :eek:
    Congrats!
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    (Original post by Hygeia)
    I'm now Dr Hygeia :eek:
    Can't rep you, but WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!
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    (Original post by Mushi_master)
    On a slightly unrelated note I can't frickin' wait for Sonisphere in a few weeks time. Slightly excited.
    Anthrax man, all I need to round out the Big 4.
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    (Original post by Hygeia)
    I'm now Dr Hygeia :eek:
    Congrats! :party:
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    (Original post by i'm no superman)
    Our semester 4 clinical skills teaching...

    - gynaecological examination - bimanual palpation, bivalve (cusco) speculum examination, performing a cervical smear
    - examination of the groin, hernial orifices and male external genitalia
    - antenatal obstetric examination
    - examining a lump (generic)
    - examination of the breast
    - GALS assessment
    - tissue viability
    - phlebotomy (manakin)
    - first aid
    - otoscopy and hearing assessment
    - manual handling

    ...and any of those + anything from semesters 1 - 3 can come up in the OSCE next week. Very underprepared. It's as if we're expected to be doctors by the end of second year or something. Some may think that it's good that we're taught clinicals earlier on - I personally think it's a bit ambitious and excessive given our curriculum structure.
    Er, thats slightly extensive. I'd probably die under the pressure! :p:

    We just had to know the following:
    CVS exam
    Resp exam
    Abdominal exam
    Shoulder exam
    Hip exam
    Knee exam
    BP measurement
    PEFR
    Walking the blind
    Talking to the deaf
    Thyroid exam
    Cranial Nerves exam
    Upper Limb exam (motor and sensory)
    Lower Limb exam (motor and sensory)
    GALS
    BLS
    Communication Skills (gaining consent, taking a history, dealing with angry patients etc).

    I swear just doing that felt like a lot to do in second year so your stuff must be crazy hard! Thats not to put you off or anything before they start! Haha.



    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    Ours is relatively systems based, but it's also spiral. Like, we did everything in year one (bar a few topics), but revisited most things in year two and covered the majority of the things we missed (and we'll cover the remainder next year).

    For instance, last year my understanding on a lot of the topics was reasonable, but not brilliant; I feel like after year two I understand most bodily systems really quite well. And a lot of the students who didn't feel comfortable with things after first year got a second chance to bolster things this year.

    I guess you could then make the argument for covering things properly once rather than the spiral filling in gaps each time you complete a turn. Then again, human memory often leaves a lot to be desired; I'm convinced I'll remember things better having covered information twice or once but had a decent grounding to work on than if I'd just covered it once from scratch.
    This is pretty much our course tbh - systems based but spiral. And it works well.

    Spoiler:
    Show
    Our course was split up like so:
    We spent 3 weeks on cardio/resp last year and 5 weeks on it this year
    We spent 3 weeks on metabolism last year and 5 weeks on it this year
    We spent 3 weeks on neuro last year and 4 weeks on it this year
    We spent 3 weeks on locomotor last year and 4 weeks on it this year
    We spent 3 weeks on human develpment last year and 4 weeks on it this year.
    We also had 3 weeks in year two on public health, epidemiology, statistics, psychology, sociology etc.


    First year was the basic anatomy + physiology with some bits of pathology thrown in there for good measure (so like Asthma, Heart Failure, COPD, CF, Sickle Cell etc). Second year focussed mainly on pathology within the systems which was more interesting in some respects.

    We didn't explicitly cover the old stuff from year one yet again in year two because that would just be pointless and there'll be no point having a first year, but some pbls this year required as to 'review' stuff from year one again to make sense of things. So in essence you had to know 'everything' for end of year exams in year 2 which is what makes second year at BL one of the hardest years (I've been told).

    I agree that the spiral curriculum really does work in that you tend to remember a lot of info by the end of second year - I was surprised how much stuff from first year I'd forgotten and back then I thought I'd learnt it properly for end of year exams. Pshhhh. Only problem is I'm choosing to intercelate next year so I'm going to have to revise all this stuff again next summer if I want to stand a chance of surviving on firms. :p:
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    (Original post by John Locke)
    thanks! well done on the absolute fab result!!!!!!



    not necessarily, we get our results back in 2 weeks or less and each write 13 (?) essays in total which is pretty efficient stuff from the examiners.
    Yeah but our medical school is relatively massive, it takes longer to go through them...

    I have no better argument than that! :p:
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    Er, thats slightly extensive. I'd probably die under the pressure! :p:

    We just had to know the following:
    CVS exam
    Resp exam
    Abdominal exam

    Shoulder exam
    Hip exam
    Knee exam
    BP measurement
    PEFR
    Walking the blind
    Talking to the deaf
    Thyroid exam
    Cranial Nerves exam

    Upper Limb exam (motor and sensory)
    Lower Limb exam (motor and sensory)
    GALS
    BLS
    Communication Skills (gaining consent, taking a history, dealing with angry patients etc).

    I swear just doing that felt like a lot to do in second year so your stuff must be crazy hard! Thats not to put you off or anything before they start! Haha.
    That's what we have to know, with added stuff like scrubbing/gloving/gowning, injections, RA or carpal tunnel hand examinations, urinalysis, TPR and stuff like that. And wrist/elbow/ankle exams too. And examining lumps and spine examination :p:
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    Yeah but our medical school is relatively massive, it takes longer to go through them...

    I have no better argument than that! :p:
    i imagine you have more examiners than us though
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    That's what we have to know, with added stuff like scrubbing/gloving/gowning, injections, RA or carpal tunnel hand examinations, urinalysis, TPR and stuff like that. And wrist/elbow/ankle exams too. And examining lumps and spine examination :p:
    Oh those tests (Phalen's Test, Tinel sign) re carpal tunnel syndrome etc. were mentioned to us at some point last year, as were Rombergs Test and tests for graphesthesia etc. this year but we weren't examined on them in OSCEs. Those specific tests tended to come in spotter exams.

    My best mate is a second year at "Norwich Medical School" () and he's always on about how good your OSCE teaching is - and I agree it is. I learnt bits of my shoulder and hip exams from him (because I didn't go to (m)any of my sessions this year) although apparently you guys dont cover neuro until later so he pretty much knows nothing on the cranial nerve examination and was like :zomg: when I told him we had to know it in year one. That said, he does have an NHS card just because of the nature of your course and gets 40% off from Nandos! So jel.

    (Original post by i'm no superman)
    sjsfsafakfhfj
    Also, LOL! Joined today!
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    (Original post by John Locke)
    i imagine you have more examiners than us though
    Hmmm, this is also true. :holmes:

    Fine, I basically dont want to have to sit essays as part of my end of year exams. :huff:

    They'd be annoying and stressful and would take longer to mark...
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    Oh those tests (Phalen's Test, Tinel sign) re carpal tunnel syndrome etc. were mentioned to us at some point last year, as were Rombergs Test and tests for graphesthesia etc. this year but we weren't examined on them in OSCEs. Those specific tests tended to come in spotter exams.

    My best mate is a second year at "Norwich Medical School" () and he's always on about how good your OSCE teaching is - and I agree it is. I learnt bits of my shoulder and hip exams from him (because I didn't go to (m)any of my sessions this year) although apparently you guys dont cover neuro until later so he pretty much knows nothing on the cranial nerve examination and was like :zomg: when I told him we had to know it in year one. That said, he does have an NHS card just because of the nature of your course and gets 40% off from Nandos! So jel.
    The Paget is amazing for teaching joint examination. The orthopod lead there is just awesome. Helped me get all my examinations to ~3mins from start to finish (with a fully compliant patient of course ) And yeah the only nerves I know are the ones in the limbs. And 40%!? I swear it's only 20........
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    ....That said, he does have an NHS card just because of the nature of your course and gets 40% off from Nandos! So jel. ...
    massively jealous of any medical schools with the early NHS cards
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    (Original post by visesh)
    Originally Posted by Becca-Sarah
    I find anyone who's willing to touch someone else's naked scrotum with bare hands a little odd, if I'm honest...
    I had to do that in my OSCE today. And there wasn't a sink nearby so I had to dash straight into the next one. It's not as bad as my friend, who ended up auscultating the scrotum and forgot to clean it for the rest of the circuit :p:
    I have to take it back. I touched a naked scrotum with my bare hands.
    And I've had to convert to the general surgery way of doing things, and only wear a single pair of gloves in theatre. It feels like I'm not wearing any. Which is concerning in the presence of poop and blood.
    No wonder I've spent all week feeling nauseated :sigh:
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    Oh those tests (Phalen's Test, Tinel sign) re carpal tunnel syndrome etc. were mentioned to us at some point last year, as were Rombergs Test and tests for graphesthesia etc. this year but we weren't examined on them in OSCEs. Those specific tests tended to come in spotter exams.

    My best mate is a second year at "Norwich Medical School" () and he's always on about how good your OSCE teaching is - and I agree it is. I learnt bits of my shoulder and hip exams from him (because I didn't go to (m)any of my sessions this year) although apparently you guys dont cover neuro until later so he pretty much knows nothing on the cranial nerve examination and was like :zomg: when I told him we had to know it in year one. That said, he does have an NHS card just because of the nature of your course and gets 40% off from Nandos! So jel.



    Also, LOL! Joined today!

    We did cranial nerve exam in year 1 too, and sensory, motor and proprioception exam.
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    The Paget is amazing for teaching joint examination. The orthopod lead there is just awesome. Helped me get all my examinations to ~3mins from start to finish (with a fully compliant patient of course ) And yeah the only nerves I know are the ones in the limbs. And 40%!? I swear it's only 20........
    Probably is 20%. All I know is that I always get him to pay for my food when we're out so I can leech off the discount too. :ninja:
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    (Original post by Medicine Man)
    Probably is 20%. All I know is that I always get him to pay for my food when we're out so I can leech off the discount too. :ninja:
    And 50% off when you collect at Dominoes :daydreaming:
 
 
 
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