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    (Original post by Ooompalumpa)
    Has anyone, despite having a high cut-off, been rejected from Liverpool because their 'score' wasn't above cut-off?

    Hi I have a higher score which was above their 'cut off' no doubt but haven't had an interview offer.

    (Original post by neuronerd)
    I sat the march gamsat in london, costs a bit more but you get results in may and can resit in sept if you like.

    If you have zero science background then you may struggle in the short timeframe. I started revision early dec with triple science at A-level equilent (3xA*) and a medical science degree. I got 72 and a friend with the same background got 60 with revision over the same time period.
    Ah interesting, for some reason I thought March's exam was in Ireland only ? I will need to do my research as looks like I'll be applying again!
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    (Original post by xangelspawnx)
    Hi I have a higher score which was above their 'cut off' no doubt but haven't had an interview offer.



    Ah interesting, for some reason I thought March's exam was in Ireland only ? I will need to do my research as looks like I'll be applying again!
    Have you sat the GAMSAT only once in the last two years?? I've sat it twice so think there's some problem that's gone on...
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    (Original post by Jimib5863)
    I am 30 next year! : (

    I have found this information. Apparently some universities do accept applicants, who are studying another degree:

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...fferent_Course

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1245817

    Although they are out of date, I should email the unis about it. I would rather complete the degree though and then apply grad entry. The way I see it. A normal medical degree is 5-6 years, so I might as well spend those 3 years getting a degree haha. Then 3 years grad med, at least then I would have a nice part time job as a radiographer to cover uni fees.
    That info is for the 5/6 year undergrad course, which is not funded by student loans for grads (which if you are taking gamsat and talking in this thread you clearly are). So if you have the 9k a year in fees to hand then go for it! However, although they are willing to consider applicants transferring - they are highly unlikely to approve of taking someone from a fully funded NHS course.

    For graduate medicine (which is the only funded way of doing it and takes 4-5 years) NONE of the unis take students on a degree program unless it is their final year.

    Also you clearly haven't thought through the "part-time" radiographer job during grad medicine. Most people on grad med stuggle to work more than a few hours a week. Radiography is generally a mon-fri role, weekends are rare and higher paid so the full time staff likely want these hours.

    If however you are not a grad and in fact have just finished A-levels, then you are posting in the wrong place for advice.


    edit: And yeah turning 30 isn't that old for grad med. I'm already there and so are a few of the other posters here...
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    (Original post by xangelspawnx)
    Ah interesting, for some reason I thought March's exam was in Ireland only ? I will need to do my research as looks like I'll be applying again!
    You can sit as an international student in London, you pay an extra fee but I personally thought it was worth it.

    You also need to put a generic number in the application (the irish equivalent of UCAS ID) but if you google it, plently of sites tell you a number to put in, I think it was a couple of letters and lots of 0's.
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    (Original post by neuronerd)
    edit: And yeah turning 30 isn't that old for grad med. I'm already there and so are a few of the other posters here...
    33 years old (will be at least 34 when I start if I get a place this year) and not feeling that age is a disadvantage here

    Maybe I can't live the typical middle class dream of finishing uni at 23, consultant and big house by 30, but that is not what motivates me anyway
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    (Original post by neuronerd)
    That info is for the 5/6 year undergrad course, which is not funded by student loans for grads (which if you are taking gamsat and talking in this thread you clearly are). So if you have the 9k a year in fees to hand then go for it! However, although they are willing to consider applicants transferring - they are highly unlikely to approve of taking someone from a fully funded NHS course.

    For graduate medicine (which is the only funded way of doing it and takes 4-5 years) NONE of the unis take students on a degree program unless it is their final year.

    Also you clearly haven't thought through the "part-time" radiographer job during grad medicine. Most people on grad med stuggle to work more than a few hours a week. Radiography is generally a mon-fri role, weekends are rare and higher paid so the full time staff likely want these hours.

    If however you are not a grad and in fact have just finished A-levels, then you are posting in the wrong place for advice.


    edit: And yeah turning 30 isn't that old for grad med. I'm already there and so are a few of the other posters here...
    Hi thanks for the info.yes I meant grad entry. I need to do more research. I did email St George's asking if their students are able to work part time with the intensity of the course, but they didn't reply.

    Also I emailed the society of radioLOGISTS to see if they would recognise any credits from a radiography degree when specialising to reduce thedoctor sepcialising 5 year post grad training. Unfortunately they do not. Lol I do not even see the point of doing radiography if I would be studying radiology later on, if I got on to medicine. But it's the wisest decision. Then try grad entry after radiography.
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    (Original post by Jimib5863)
    Hi thanks for the info.yes I meant grad entry. I need to do more research. I did email St George's asking if their students are able to work part time with the intensity of the course, but they didn't reply.

    Also I emailed the society of radioLOGISTS to see if they would recognise any credits from a radiography degree when specialising to reduce thedoctor sepcialising 5 year post grad training. Unfortunately they do not. Lol I do not even see the point of doing radiography if I would be studying radiology later on, if I got on to medicine. But it's the wisest decision. Then try grad entry after radiography.
    I fail to see how taking on another degree is a wise decision when you want to apply to GEM. It will not improve your application any more than a-level chemistry would and comes with added debt and will take you three years.

    I don't wish to berate you. But doing another degree is the worst thing you can do if you want to do gem. Gem might not even be around in three years, not in its current form.

    Every gem applicant and student would advise you just to keep applying to GEM and only do radiography if you have decided gem is no longer for you. Save yourself the money and the effort and reapply. One 'gap' year is surely better than three doing a second undergraduate degree?
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    (Original post by Jimib5863)
    Hi thanks for the info.yes I meant grad entry. I need to do more research. I did email St George's asking if their students are able to work part time with the intensity of the course, but they didn't reply.

    Also I emailed the society of radioLOGISTS to see if they would recognise any credits from a radiography degree when specialising to reduce thedoctor sepcialising 5 year post grad training. Unfortunately they do not. Lol I do not even see the point of doing radiography if I would be studying radiology later on, if I got on to medicine. But it's the wisest decision. Then try grad entry after radiography.
    If you want to do medicine the 'wisest' idea is to get a HCA job (or similar) in the NHS and work your butt off for the GAMSAT. Do shadowing, voluteer and make your application amazing.

    Another three years on a degree you don't want would make you older and make you look flakey when deciding on a career.

    If you screw up the gamsat you can apply for a two year accelerated radiography degree at teeside starting in january and you'll graduate in the same amount of time.

    Big question is how much do you really want to be a doctor? Most of us here would do pretty much anything for it , it takes scarifice and commitment not just to get in, but for the next 10+ years!
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    (Original post by neuronerd)
    You can sit as an international student in London, you pay an extra fee but I personally thought it was worth it.

    You also need to put a generic number in the application (the irish equivalent of UCAS ID) but if you google it, plently of sites tell you a number to put in, I think it was a couple of letters and lots of 0's.
    Yes thankyou I have since seen that there is a centre sitting in London (if there a still spaces left) . What did you find most useful when preparing for sec 3 in a shorter time frame ? I feel like I have forgotten everything since September.
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    (Original post by Jimib5863)
    Hi thanks for the info.yes I meant grad entry. I need to do more research. I did email St George's asking if their students are able to work part time with the intensity of the course, but they didn't reply.

    Also I emailed the society of radioLOGISTS to see if they would recognise any credits from a radiography degree when specialising to reduce thedoctor sepcialising 5 year post grad training. Unfortunately they do not. Lol I do not even see the point of doing radiography if I would be studying radiology later on, if I got on to medicine. But it's the wisest decision. Then try grad entry after radiography.
    The GMC will be releasing its new registration scheme soon which could make GEM's irrelevant! Bristol have already cancelled theirs. With the government also scrapping a lot of NHS course funding it maybe won't be funded in the years to come. I wouldn't wait.


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    (Original post by ForestCat)
    I fail to see how taking on another degree is a wise decision when you want to apply to GEM. It will not improve your application any more than a-level chemistry would and comes with added debt and will take you three years.

    I don't wish to berate you. But doing another degree is the worst thing you can do if you want to do gem. Gem might not even be around in three years, not in its current form.

    Every gem applicant and student would advise you just to keep applying to GEM and only do radiography if you have decided gem is no longer for you. Save yourself the money and the effort and reapply. One 'gap' year is surely better than three doing a second undergraduate degree?
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    You are right. It's hard to make a decision like this.


    (Original post by neuronerd)
    If you want to do medicine the 'wisest' idea is to get a HCA job (or similar) in the NHS and work your butt off for the GAMSAT. Do shadowing, voluteer and make your application amazing.

    Another three years on a degree you don't want would make you older and make you look flakey when deciding on a career.

    If you screw up the gamsat you can apply for a two year accelerated radiography degree at teeside starting in january and you'll graduate in the same amount of time.

    Big question is how much do you really want to be a doctor? Most of us here would do pretty much anything for it , it takes scarifice and commitment not just to get in, but for the next 10+ years!
    Thanks for the info, I had no idea about Teeside having an accelerated radiography degree.

    I am applying for health support worker training with the NHS as we speak. I need to see if healthcare assistant and support worker are similar.

    I do want it. 3 years ago I started on a journey to retake my GCSEs and A-level Study to get me up to scratch. I was willing to go to Bulgaria to study medicine. Did you know you can do grad entry in Bulgaria? And once you qualify you go straight to FY2, because it's a masters in medicine, since it's recognised by GMC? Because my degree is in music I can't do it, but I am sure people on here, who did Biomedical could. You could literally start in the 3rd/4th year depending on your credits. I wish I did a science degree.
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    (Original post by Jimib5863)
    You are right. It's hard to make a decision like this.




    Thanks for the info, I had no idea about Teeside having an accelerated radiography degree.

    I am applying for health support worker training with the NHS as we speak. I need to see if healthcare assistant and support worker are similar.

    I do want it. 3 years ago I started on a journey to retake my GCSEs and A-level Study to get me up to scratch. I was willing to go to Bulgaria to study medicine. Did you know you can do grad entry in Bulgaria? And once you qualify you go straight to FY2, because it's a masters in medicine, since it's recognised by GMC? Because my degree is in music I can't do it, but I am sure people on here, who did Biomedical could. You could literally start in the 3rd/4th year depending on your credits. I wish I did a science degree.
    Ok this will be my last post on the matter.

    You need to do some research.

    HCA and HCSW are the same.

    You cannot go straight to F2. That is ridiculous. F1 is where you learn how to apply the skills you have learnt and use them in a hospital setting. Yes you can take F1 overseas but it is still F1. A masters does not negate the need to do F1.

    There are plenty of uni's overseas that offer medicine courses (generally with easier entry requirements, often with dodgy systems and bribes still in use). None of these are funded. Not one. If you have the cash then go, if not then you are stuck with GEM in the UK like the rest of us.

    You cannot use science degree credits towards a medical degree, I have both a bachelors and a masters in neuroscience - NO MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE AT ALL. You just can't shortcut. I've have no medical placements, no OSCEs, no diagnostic skills, how could you suggest skipping 3-4 years of vital training? I know how the brain works in explicit detail, but that is not what a medic knows, they have a completely different skill set and knowledge base. Whilst there is crossover, it is less than you expect.

    We have all suggested you take a gap year and apply for 2017 entry. If you disagree that is your choice, but you are unlikely to get different advice from us in this forum.
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    (Original post by neuronerd)
    Ok this will be my last post on the matter.

    You need to do some research.

    HCA and HCSW are the same.

    You cannot go straight to F2. That is ridiculous. F1 is where you learn how to apply the skills you have learnt and use them in a hospital setting. Yes you can take F1 overseas but it is still F1. A masters does not negate the need to do F1.

    There are plenty of uni's overseas that offer medicine courses (generally with easier entry requirements, often with dodgy systems and bribes still in use). None of these are funded. Not one. If you have the cash then go, if not then you are stuck with GEM in the UK like the rest of us.

    You cannot use science degree credits towards a medical degree, I have both a bachelors and a masters in neuroscience - NO MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE AT ALL. You just can't shortcut. I've have no medical placements, no OSCEs, no diagnostic skills, how could you suggest skipping 3-4 years of vital training? I know how the brain works in explicit detail, but that is not what a medic knows, they have a completely different skill set and knowledge base. Whilst there is crossover, it is less than you expect.

    We have all suggested you take a gap year and apply for 2017 entry. If you disagree that is your choice, but you are unlikely to get different advice from us in this forum.
    I was only asking. Being on this forum asking other people's advice is great research and what a forum is all about. If it annoys you so much then fine. Thanks for your help anyways.
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    (Original post by manupalace)
    I sat September GAMSAT back in 2011. Did almost no prep for the science section (only looked up some physics equations which didn't even help me in he end because I forgot them).

    Read through relevant sections of the gold standard book for sections one and two.

    I was in year 3 of a pharmacy degree with a large amount of Chem and biochem content. I had also done A Level Chemistry and English lit plus AS biology in sixth form.

    Got a score of 60 something. Got a st Georges interview and an offer after my second attempt at the mmi. I'm doing grad med at Imperial.

    Just to show something can be achieved in a short timeframe especially if you have good base knowledge. But I definitely wouldn't recommend my approach. GAMSAT in March is great if you have the money and are happy for it to be potentially wasted. It could great practice in terms of the paper and the whole stressful exhausting day and provide a baseline if nothing else (though practice papers are available). Best case scenario you get a great score and can use it for 2017 entry.


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    I'd just like to counter that and say it depends on what you already know and if you're good at taking exams. It's also dependent on the way others perform in that sitting as its a scaled score.

    I don't know many people who have done well in it with a few months prep. So that's not to say you couldn't do well in March.

    The thing with March is that you get the result in May and can either apply with that score or resist it. I know a lot of people in March when I sat it were resitters. Most people in fact.

    I agree with the above that it may be good to do it once to get a feel for he paper and the day, because it is long. That depends if you can afford to sit it and afford accommodation and travel to London.

    Alternatively you could start studying now for September and do small amounts to build yourself up.

    I did it September 2014 did terribly as I had only 6-8 weeks to cram and I got stressed. I got 46 so got straight rejections. In March I had more time to prepare and started in December. I got 55. It is great but it's got me an interview at Liverpool. It's a massive improvement from my first score though which is what is important and proof that for me I needed time. I also think that familiarity with the paper helped tremendously.


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    (Original post by Jimib5863)
    Fair enough. I'm getting old. Can't risk waiting another year if I failed the GAMSAT. I will email the unis regarding the subject of applying. It's not like I don't want to do radiography it's a great subject. If I can't be radiologist, then this is what I want to do. Thanks for your help.
    Being a radiographer is obviously very different that a doctor. I wouldn't say that medicine is a back up to radiography or the Latter being a stepping stone for the other. Medicine is a huge commitment and is a commitment to life long learning so is really have a serious think about what it is you want from a career decision


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    (Original post by Creatingchaos)
    Maybe UKCAT? What did you get?
    685 so not brilliant,

    perhaps they wanted a first and a UKCAT of 690 or above (seeing as someone got an interview with a 1st and a 695 UKCAT
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    (Original post by Ooompalumpa)
    Has anyone, despite having a high cut-off, been rejected from Liverpool because their 'score' wasn't above cut-off?
    If you have two scores (say 2015 September and 2015 March) did you say which one you want to use and declare it through [email protected] to tell UCAS. If you did, I would call them on Monday morning and ask!


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    (Original post by Shellfish002)
    685 so not brilliant,

    perhaps they wanted a first and a UKCAT of 690 or above (seeing as someone got an interview with a 1st and a 695 UKCAT
    It may just be that there were enough people to interview with a first (obtained or predicted) who happened to get a UKCAT above yours. I don't think they specifically set a cut off point, they just work from the top downwards
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    (Original post by Shellfish002)
    685 so not brilliant,

    perhaps they wanted a first and a UKCAT of 690 or above (seeing as someone got an interview with a 1st and a 695 UKCAT
    I got 697.5 on my UKCAT and have a 1st but am still yet to hear from Barts!! Utterly perplexed by their admissions process. Harboring a secret hope that they'll be giving out more interviews as they haven't actually rejected me yet but getting less optimistic by the day haha
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    For those who had their King's interview yesterday, how did it go? I have mine on Monday and the nerves are kicking in already haha.

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