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Why DONT you want to be well paid? watch

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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    I really find it hard to understand why people go for low paid jobs when they seem to have the intellectual capability to aim for industries which are relatively well-paid.

    I see students who have the credentials and the profile potential to enter industries such as law, investment banking being etc.. but instead choose to go into places such as teaching. Are they just lazy?

    So if you do intend to get out of bed for a job that pays less than £50k a year and you're smart (i.e flawless grades/credible uni/strong ECs), why? what's your motivation?

    inb4, "it's my passion".
    That is a good question and I've seen some very interesting responses so far. Now here's my take:

    I'm from a wealthy family, but now I've realised that having a load of money isn't really that amazing. Yes, you do get a big house, some very nice cars and all the rest, but the novelty soon wears off. With this in mind, I have decided to do something that I'll enjoy after graduating this summer. As far as I'm concerned, those who compromise their own interests/dreams for the sake of attaining well-paid work don't really have any idea of the value of life.

    Note: I haven't said that I don't want to be well-paid, but that money won't influence the decisions I'll be faced with after graduating.
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    You haven't a clue mate. If someone's smart enough to make it into IB, then they probably a smart enough to realise the exit opps.
    Lol. Yeah, smart enough to realise that if you just want money then the best exit opp is pre-entry. That friend regretted his time in banking because he found it boring, didn't enjoy it and didn't even need a great deal of start up cash for his business. His contacts came from business he was into before banking.

    Maybe when you mature you will realise that just because you have a hard-on for IB, it is a niche and geeky interest and isn't worth it solely for the money. That is why people don't want it, whether they are 'smart' enough or not.

    I know a few people who are in/have formerly worked in IB and they aren't the richest people I know. There are more entrepreneurs and more wealth in it generally than IB.

    I have a friend in the wholesale business who made his first million at 19. He is 22 now - you have focused your life for probably 2-3 years so far and probably the next 2-3 just to get a ****ty 50 grand a year to slave away doing what most people would find uninteresting.

    Bottom line - if you happen to find that stuff interesting and worth aspiring to then great but understand that most people find that it is geeky, dull and the game isn't worth the candle. So try and grow up and learn the fact that your 'passion' isn't exciting to other people and try to understand that your lack of understanding why it isn't everyone's choice just makes you seem autistic
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    k9k I am more fun than you, gauranteed. Got better hobbies then u too m8, lol u use tsr ffs, you are in no position to talk. You probs socially degenerate.

    LOOOOL check dis gassed buttahz yout tinking he's big ting, dem hobbies include blazin,stealing bikes en hanging on dat council estate yh g #momoneymoproblemz
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    You've gone down the low risk low reward route bruh.
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    (Original post by Europhile)
    The only rich people I know are entrepreneurs. What background they came from doesn't matter. It's where they are at now and what they are now that matters. They're rich because they went from building up someone elses assets to building up their own asset portfolio. It's not hard to work out that if you work for someone else the glass ceiling is put in place by them but if you work for yourself the sky is the limit.
    I disagree with your point about background. I think your background heavily influences your ability to set up your own business, whether directly or indirectly. It's unsurprising that most of the examples so far have come from those who come from well off backgrounds (like yourself), who can have the luxury of family wealth to full back on if/when needed.

    Added to the fact they are educated by those who run business around them, means their ability to access "business knowledge" is much higher than someone who hasn't got that support/contacts.

    If your starting higher up the ladder, any success in relative terms is lower than those who started at the bottom. So it isn't just about where you currently are, but where you started from too (in my opinion).


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    I disagree with your point about background. I think your background heavily influences your ability to set up your own business, whether directly or indirectly. It's unsurprising that most of the examples so far have come from those who come from well off backgrounds (like yourself), who can have the luxury of family wealth to full back on if/when needed.
    I meant background in terms of previous occupations as opposed to their social background. Social background of course plays a massive factor. My point is, whether someone is a lawyer, banker, builder, real estate agent, etc. the only way they're making any serious money is becoming indispensable to their firm or by setting up their own business. If someone used to be a waitress but now she is a managing director of her own chain of restaurants I'm going to judge her on what she is today, not the waitress she used to be. If you are going into a field to gain experience before setting yourself up, fair enough because it can be a sensible way of doing things, but lets not pretend you can get rich by investing your time and money into someone elses dream.
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    (Original post by Europhile)
    I meant background in terms of previous occupations as opposed to their social background. Social background of course plays a massive factor. My point is, whether someone is a lawyer, banker, builder, real estate agent, etc. the only way they're making any serious money is becoming indispensable to their firm or by setting up their own business. If someone used to be a waitress but now she is a managing director of her own chain of restaurants I'm going to judge her on what she is today, not the waitress she used to be. If you are going into a field to gain experience before setting yourself up, fair enough because it can be a sensible way of doing things, but lets not pretend you can get rich by investing your time and money into someone elses dream.
    In many people's eye they will be rich when being an employee. Maybe not relatively rich compared to the very high level successful business you keep referring to (not all businesses are making the money you keep referring to), but in the grand scheme of things an employee can be exceptionally well off, especially when earning shares within a business.





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    People need the entry point. You can't go straight from university into a senior role. You need experience.

    It isn't about intellectual capabilities.
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    I really find it hard to understand why people go for low paid jobs when they seem to have the intellectual capability to aim for industries which are relatively well-paid.

    I see students who have the credentials and the profile potential to enter industries such as law, investment banking being etc.. but instead choose to go into places such as teaching. Are they just lazy?

    So if you do intend to get out of bed for a job that pays less than £50k a year and you're smart (i.e flawless grades/credible uni/strong ECs), why? what's your motivation?

    inb4, "it's my passion".
    You have demonstrated an inescapable love for money, something that is frowned upon in the Qur'an. How can you be certain there is a place for you in Jannah?
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    (Original post by Jay84)
    Lol. Yeah, smart enough to realise that if you just want money then the best exit opp is pre-entry. That friend regretted his time in banking because he found it boring, didn't enjoy it and didn't even need a great deal of start up cash for his business. His contacts came from business he was into before banking.

    Maybe when you mature you will realise that just because you have a hard-on for IB, it is a niche and geeky interest and isn't worth it solely for the money. That is why people don't want it, whether they are 'smart' enough or not.

    I know a few people who are in/have formerly worked in IB and they aren't the richest people I know. There are more entrepreneurs and more wealth in it generally than IB.

    I have a friend in the wholesale business who made his first million at 19. He is 22 now - you have focused your life for probably 2-3 years so far and probably the next 2-3 just to get a ****ty 50 grand a year to slave away doing what most people would find uninteresting.

    Bottom line - if you happen to find that stuff interesting and worth aspiring to then great but understand that most people find that it is geeky, dull and the game isn't worth the candle. So try and grow up and learn the fact that your 'passion' isn't exciting to other people and try to understand that your lack of understanding why it isn't everyone's choice just makes you seem autistic
    :congrats::congrats::congrats:

    The kid is driven by status even more than money, hence IB. He needs to feel better than people to compensate for coming from a lowly background.

    I've come across all these sorts of people in the city, on their 'high' salaries thinking they're **** and the people I know who are actually worth money are some of the nicest, humble people because they haven't got an 'I came from the bottom' complex.
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    Low paid jobs = work life balance
    Highly paid jobs = no life whatsoever!
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    (Original post by DancinBallerina)
    Low paid jobs = work life balance
    Highly paid jobs = no life whatsoever!
    Not really, some carers/teachers work extremely long hours for low pay whilst some executives work a normal week for above average.

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    (Original post by will2348)
    Not really, some carers/teachers work extremely long hours for low pay whilst some executives work a normal week for above average.

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    Not what I've heard / witnessed with my own eyes! I'm on a low wage, and I've got a work /life balance. Whereas there are people who earn in the region of £90k where I work, and they have no life whatsoever!!

    Perhaps it's down to industry that people work in? :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    ignorance is strong in this one.
    Or a reality check 'is strong in this one'. I understand to be fair, you come from a deprived area and background so the thought of potentially making a lot of money excites you. Though, from what I have read in the past you break down when trying to talk to girls and don't know how to have fun. If you go into IB, the work, work, work nature of the job means you won't have much time to do either of the two, so it does seem like a perfect match
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    (Original post by DancinBallerina)
    Not what I've heard / witnessed with my own eyes! I'm on a low wage, and I've got a work /life balance. Whereas there are people who earn in the region of £90k where I work, and they have no life whatsoever!!

    Perhaps it's down to industry that people work in? :dontknow:
    Yeah, I agree with you but was just pointing it out. I think generally the rule is right but there are exceptions.

    For example, tube drivers get the same salary as a junior banker despite the fact the train drives itself. Perfect example of high pay meets normal working hours.

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    (Original post by fbrep2012)
    Or a reality check 'is strong in this one'. I understand to be fair, you come from a deprived area and background so the thought of potentially making a lot of money excites you. Though, from what I have read in the past you break down when trying to talk to girls and don't know how to have fun. If you go into IB, the work, work, work nature of the job means you won't have much time to do either of the two, so it does seem like a perfect match
    my girlfriends hotter than yours, 100% guaranteed. I have more fun in life than you do k9k
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    (Original post by will2348)
    Yeah, I agree with you but was just pointing it out. I think generally the rule is right but there are exceptions.

    For example, tube drivers get the same salary as a junior banker despite the fact the train drives itself. Perfect example of high pay meets normal working hours.

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    Lol wut, tube driver get bonus. I'm studying the wrong degree
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    There is little difference between earning 50k and 80k. Once you are up in the high end, you don't need to worry about money ever again.

    Why accept a job for more money when you have one that you love which provides sufficient money for everything you love.

    I can understand moving to a better paid but less satisfying job if you are in desperate financial need; but otherwise?
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    (Original post by Abdul-Karim)
    Lol wut, tube driver get bonus. I'm studying the wrong degree
    Same base salary - higher per hour though I bet

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    (Original post by Keyhofi)
    There is little difference between earning 50k and 80k. Once you are up in the high end, you don't need to worry about money ever again.

    Why accept a job for more money when you have one that you love which provides sufficient money for everything you love.

    I can understand moving to a better paid but less satisfying job if you are in desperate financial need; but otherwise?
    Dude, because money is bae. Money = power = respect = get hotter girls
 
 
 
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