Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Midgeymoo17)
    Unis do not see if you have extra time or not, his information is protected by the Data Protection Act. Only JCQ +/- the exam board know dependant on the percentage. There are not legally and do not release this information.
    Yes they do, the exam boards send more than just you grades....It says in their terms and conditions. Also UCAS mention it as well. The Data Protection Act does not cover what information people can give to one another. Actually the Data Protection Act is worse for people with extra time because it states that "All data must be accuarate, adequate and non-excessive", so people have to know if the exam boards are willing to share that information in which they do.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Yes extra time is necessary for many people as they may be slightly disadvantaged compared to the thousands of people that sit their exams. They may not be able to read or write so the extra time gives them assurance that they can get a high grade.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by OturuDansay)
    Yes they do, the exam boards send more than just you grades....It says in their terms and conditions. Also UCAS mention it as well. The Data Protection Act does not cover what information people can give to one another. Actually the Data Protection Act is worse for people with extra time because it states that "All data must be accuarate, adequate and non-excessive", so people have to know if the exam boards are willing to share that information in which they do.
    Ok. Lets assume (wrongly) that they do it will no bearing on your application. This I can assure you as I receive time and a half and have had offers from UCL, Birmingham, Durham, Manchester, Liverpool and Cardiff. I can assure none of then knew I had extra time because they we told by JCQ?UCAS. They knew because I put it on my UCAS form and chose to have it there.

    Secondly the bit underlined is not entirely accurate otherwise extra time candidates would not have to sign the JCQ Data Protection notice which physically states between which organisations information on extra time can be shared between. Of which no universities are included. However I agree it is sketchy in what can be shared between those organisations as that remains at the discretion of the organisations you have consented to sharing that information.

    For the bold bit it would be really nice if you could quote this point from there T&C's, because I think you will find that the Exam Boards do not routinely share access arrangements as this would normally be deemed excessive. However its is likely they will retain the right to do so because certain arrangements would undermine the assessment objectives- such as a Bilateral upper arm amputee being granted exemption from A level Physics Practical Unit as they are unable to complete the practical work themself. As such that would be shared as exemption shows on the Certificate, extra time does not show on the certificate.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by georgia-hughes)
    I have ADD and severe slow processing. This means it takes me longer to write, harder to concentrate for a long period of time on one thing and basically longer to transfer knowledge from brain to paper which is a side effect of having mild cerebral palsy. This was diagnosed two months into year 13. Throughout my GCSE's and AS's, teachers were completely puzzled as to why I was getting C's, D's and E's despite having a high IQ and getting top grades in untimed questions. For example, in my ICT paper, we were given 2 hours and 15 minutes (plenty for an 80 mark paper), and the questions were fairly short, I finished on time and achieved an A, however, on my politics paper, a mark a minute, a missed out a 40 mark question because I didn't have time to finish it, yet I achieved nearly full marks in the questions I did complete resulting in low grades. Does this mean I am any less intelligent than the person who completed the paper within the time frame?

    I now have 50% extra time in my exams, this doesn't give me an advantage believe me, it puts me at the same level as the reasonably competent student and allows me to get the grades that I am capable of. I get why people don't think that extra time is fair, but how frustrated would you be if you spent months revising for exams that you were well capable of acing only to be stopped half way through.

    I find that the 'work life' argument is rather weak. Yes we are all given deadlines to some extent, but how often are employees sat down and told to reproduce a year or two's worth of revision in a tight time frame? It cost my parents £400 to 'diagnose' me which is there to try and deter students from abusing the system (although I am aware it still happens) and my mother was also diagnosed despite being in her 50's with a six figure salary so there is a prime example of how unrealistic your argument is.

    So, to entertain your point of view, maybe a career based on strict deadlines and high concentration for long periods of time isn't for me,but guess what, theres thousands of careers out there and I'll choose one that suits my working style, however education in this country does't work like that and considering I applied to russell group universities, I gathered A-Levels would be the most realistic option.

    Standardised testing has it's flaws and with my conditions, I suffer as a result of those flaws. Extra time shouldn't be awarded to those who don't need it, that is a kick in the face to me and those who work incredibly hard to finish in the snappy time frames and those who don't finish a lot of the questions(I did have a college friend who ended up not being able to complete many of the questions and my mam didn't finish I think most of her O Levels). However, the ignorance about extra time is appalling, and maybe you ought to face the realisation that standardised testing is the problem and not extra time. Shouldn't exams be about knowledge rather than speed of completing the exam?
    An employer will want 8 hours work not 6 thats what they are paying you for, tests for graduate schemes that employers will give you often have tight time limits just as exams.As I have said before exams have strict time limits so clearly speed is being assessed and thus slow processing should result in a lower grade.

    Your mother didn't get 50% extra time for her exams though?

    Giving people extra time makes the test easier(99% of people would probably agree), it makes it substantially easier for people like you as thats the skill you are bad at no longer being tested.I think most students would agree that finishing the test in time is actually a difficult skill that many struggle with and end up not finishing questions or not completing them properly due to rushing and silly mistakes and not enough time to think through the question(I didn't finish 2 of my University exams I didn't miss out that much though).If you got the most difficult exam questions and gave everyone more time I think a lot of people would have cracked them and got them right.

    A more reasonable argument would be whether the examination time should be increased so as to not assess speed but I think this is a skill many employers would want and this is indicated by the timed tests they give potential employees.

    I also don't really get why these disabilities count as disabilities you have it as a result of getting some bad genes from your parents, students who are very dumb and don't perform well in exams have also got bad genes from their parents/bad environmental factors and those who perform well have got good genes/good environmental factors.If we accounted for genes and environmental factors everyone would probably get about the same and then all the exams would be pointless.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    My friend gets extra time because he has dyslexia, but he hates it because people tell him he is so lucky to get extra time but in reality would you like to have difficulty in learning to read or interpret words or letters and to be not able to spell simple words. So I believe it is fair.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I have it because I don't know why, but I only use it on certain papers as I am done before normal time most often.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    If you had extra time in your exams, (for those who don't already have it) do you genuinely think you would get significantly better grades?
    Yes 100%! Because I can read over my answer 1000000 times to check spelling as well as seeing if I could stick in a * to add some more.

    I feel getting extra time is fair, but only for some people. Others clearly lie about their abilities...
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by Dalek1099)

    Giving people extra time makes the test easier(99% of people would probably agree), it makes it substantially easier for people like you as thats the skill you are bad at no longer being tested.I think most students would agree that finishing the test in time is actually a difficult skill that many struggle with and end up not finishing questions or not completing them properly due to rushing and silly mistakes and not enough time to think through the question(I didn't finish 2 of my University exams I didn't miss out that much though).If you got the most difficult exam questions and gave everyone more time I think a lot of people would have cracked them and got them right.
    Extra time doesn't make the test easier. It gives me extra time to understand and fully read the question properly. It also means I'm not having to rush so much. I read slowly due to a sight condition I have. I'm also Autistic, which causes problems with how I understand language, meaning as well as reading slower than most people due to partial sight, I've got to read the question several times to actually understand it. Therefore, the extra time doesn't actually make it easier. It just puts me on a more level playing field as everyone else.

    A more reasonable argument would be whether the examination time should be increased so as to not assess speed but I think this is a skill many employers would want and this is indicated by the timed tests they give potential employees.
    Extra time is a reasonable adjustment.

    I also don't really get why these disabilities count as disabilities you have it as a result of getting some bad genes from your parents, students who are very dumb and don't perform well in exams have also got bad genes from their parents/bad environmental factors and those who perform well have got good genes/good environmental factors.If we accounted for genes and environmental factors everyone would probably get about the same and then all the exams would be pointless.
    What the hell? Aside from my brain injury and hearing loss, all my disabilities are genetic. According to your bizarre logic, they're not disabilities, because they're genetic. Most people with one of my genetic conditions, go blind in their 30s.

    I get the impression that you're just very bitter. You really have no idea how lucky you are that you don't need extra time or rest breaks, in order to do your exams.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Extra time doesn't make the test easier. It gives me extra time to understand and fully read the question properly. It also means I'm not having to rush so much. I read slowly due to a sight condition I have. I'm also Autistic, which causes problems with how I understand language, meaning as well as reading slower than most people due to partial sight, I've got to read the question several times to actually understand it. Therefore, the extra time doesn't actually make it easier. It just puts me on a more level playing field as everyone else.

    Extra time is a reasonable adjustment.

    What the hell? Aside from my brain injury and hearing loss, all my disabilities are genetic. According to your bizarre logic, they're not disabilities, because they're genetic. Most people with one of my genetic conditions, go blind in their 30s.

    I get the impression that you're just very bitter. You really have no idea how lucky you are that you don't need extra time or rest breaks, in order to do your exams.
    Whilst I do not necessarily agree with this, I believe what is meant by this is that IQ could also be seen as a genetic disorder. Think about it - if you have a lower IQ, you probably will do worse than someone with a higher IQ with the equal amount of work and teaching. Therefore IQ is a factor in determining your grade. Yet, noone can really change their IQ, it is determined by what genes you inherited - so in some ways IQ is just as much of a factor as learning disabilitiies - but time isn't allocated based on peoples' IQ. Therefore some people would say that similarly, genes which cause disabilites inherited from parents should similarly not affect time allocation.

    Personally, I do not agree with this.

    Of course it all comes down to what you think should be examined. Some people think that if you put enough work in, you should be able to get that A* no matter your IQ, disabilities or individual abilities.
    Others believe that exams ought to purely be a test of what you can do in that paper in 1 hour - no matter what disabilities, abilities or IQ you have. These people think that if a disability is affecting you, then that's part of the test and that is something which is going to take away from your grade, in the same way that not studying or having a low IQ would.
    Others believe that it should be a test of IQ and your ability; so disabilities and work time shouldn't affect it. They believe that if you are clever and good at english, you ought to get a good grade in english no matter if you put in hours or have certain disabilities.
    Overall, there are a lot of factors determining exam results, and everyone has different opinions about which should be tested and which should be equalled out in a level playing field
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    Most people have to rush quite a bit to finish exams I certainly have had to.Why should Autistic people get extra time?The exams don't test socialising skills?If you are struggling to understand text then it generally means your Reading skills are bad as text in exams is usually literal its certainly not the jokey sort of language autistic people would get confused with.
    le sigh. One of the problems I have as an Autistic person, is how I understand written language. If I am given paragraphs of writing, I have to read them several times because I don't always understand what they really mean.

    It's nothing to do with reading skills. It's to do with processing and understanding language.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    le sigh. One of the problems I have as an Autistic person, is how I understand written language. If I am given paragraphs of writing, I have to read them several times because I don't always understand what they really mean.

    It's nothing to do with reading skills. It's to do with processing and understanding language.
    Again, its down to what people think should be examined. You can be examined on a whole host of things:
    Understanding
    Knowledge
    Ability to convey facts/concepts
    Analysis
    Thinking speed/processing
    IQ
    Reading ability

    There are also many that exams inadvertantly test: writing speed, reading speed etc.

    People all have different views on what should be examined. Some would say only one of the things listed aboe, others would say a mixture - thus the disagreement.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dalek1099)
    An employer will want 8 hours work not 6 thats what they are paying you for, tests for graduate schemes that employers will give you often have tight time limits just as exams.As I have said before exams have strict time limits so clearly speed is being assessed and thus slow processing should result in a lower grade.

    Your mother didn't get 50% extra time for her exams though?

    Giving people extra time makes the test easier(99% of people would probably agree), it makes it substantially easier for people like you as thats the skill you are bad at no longer being tested.I think most students would agree that finishing the test in time is actually a difficult skill that many struggle with and end up not finishing questions or not completing them properly due to rushing and silly mistakes and not enough time to think through the question(I didn't finish 2 of my University exams I didn't miss out that much though).If you got the most difficult exam questions and gave everyone more time I think a lot of people would have cracked them and got them right.

    A more reasonable argument would be whether the examination time should be increased so as to not assess speed but I think this is a skill many employers would want and this is indicated by the timed tests they give potential employees.

    I also don't really get why these disabilities count as disabilities you have it as a result of getting some bad genes from your parents, students who are very dumb and don't perform well in exams have also got bad genes from their parents/bad environmental factors and those who perform well have got good genes/good environmental factors.If we accounted for genes and environmental factors everyone would probably get about the same and then all the exams would be pointless.
    I run my own business from home as well as doing my A-levels, I am self employed and after my law degree I plan to qualify as a barrister. The reason I say this is for two reasons. The first is that, as of right now I don't have an 'employer' I am my own boss, you're assuming every career under the sun works from 9 to 5 and requires me to sit and write non stop which is where most people with extra time struggle. So where do you suppose I work if employers won't want to hire me because you can write quicker than me? Ever heard of a laptop? Its bloody marvellous and is used in many woking environments!

    Secondly, the career I have chosen requires me to have hefty knowledge (tested at A-Level), an ability to get things done at a reasonable speed yes fair enough tested at A-Level, but a lot of my work will be verbal, meeting with clients, discussing plans, meetings, debating, high confidence... many things that aren't tested at GCSE or A-Level.

    So maybe you come back and say that I if it takes me longer to write than everyone else, why would you take A-Levels? Well options are limited, I have applied and had offers from top universities which means that BTEC's wouldn't have cut it, lets face it A-Levels are a ticket into university. I have every right to take A-Levels in order to go to university.

    My mother took O Levels, back in those days the time limits weren't nearly as sharp as they are now, I often hear the older generations talking about how they were sat in the exam halls for hours as they were simply being tested on knowledge rather than speed of writing, I believe thats what A-Levels should be. Even if she did have extra time in exams, exams weren't as crucial back then as they are now, hell you could get unconditional's with a few D's and Cs' back them.

    This is how I see extra time, a boy with only one leg is clearly at a disadvantage in a running race, so to try and combat this, you give him a prosthetic. Is that unfair? Because thats whats happening with me, only my disabilities can't be seen.

    Why should I settle for a university that isn't as prestigious or academically recognised simply because it takes me longer to write down my answers to yours? If we have the exact same answers, why should you attend a better university just because you finished ten minutes before me? Extra time would make the exam easier for you as someone without a disability! Not me!!!! Having extra time puts me at the same level as you believe me, you're acting closed minded because you can't grasp the idea of not physically being able to write quick enough for an exam to the point that it massively impacts your life.

    You're clearly intimidated by those who have extra time in exams, your final paragraph screams it. I think your ego would thrive if extra time was removed, to watch more intelligent and hard working people score lower than you simply because you can write quicker. The most important skills required for work are those not tested, they shine through and spread through word of mouth and demonstration in interviews, not a grade on a piece of paper, GCSE's and A-Levels are rarely looked at after university!
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    le sigh. One of the problems I have as an Autistic person, is how I understand written language. If I am given paragraphs of writing, I have to read them several times because I don't always understand what they really mean.

    It's nothing to do with reading skills. It's to do with processing and understanding language.
    There is no difference, when I did my Reading exams what was assessed was your understanding and processing of the language you didn't get any marks for simply reading it.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by georgia-hughes)
    This is how I see extra time, a boy with only one leg is clearly at a disadvantage in a running race, so to try and combat this, you give him a prosthetic. Is that unfair? Because thats whats happening with me, only my disabilities can't be seen.

    Why should I settle for a university that isn't as prestigious or academically recognised simply because it takes me longer to write down my answers to yours? If we have the exact same answers, why should you attend a better university just because you finished ten minutes before me? Extra time would make the exam easier for you as someone without a disability! Not me!!!! Having extra time puts me at the same level as you believe me, you're acting closed minded because you can't grasp the idea of not physically being able to write quick enough for an exam to the point that it massively impacts your life.

    You're clearly intimidated by those who have extra time in exams, your final paragraph screams it. I think your ego would thrive if extra time was removed, to watch more intelligent and hard working people score lower than you simply because you can write quicker. The most important skills required for work are those not tested, they shine through and spread through word of mouth and demonstration in interviews, not a grade on a piece of paper, GCSE's and A-Levels are rarely looked at after university!
    Could I just say that this clearly shows that you believe that hard work, knowledge and intelligence is what should be tested (I personally agree) - but not everyone agrees. As I said above, many people believe that exams should just be a test of what you can get done in a certain time limit and everything, including disabilites, is therefore being tested. You may not agree, in teh same way I disagree with that point of view, but it is a valid view and you should accept that.

    Imagine being someone who had a very low IQ - like to the point where it has "medical terminology". You would feel disadvantaged because no matter how much work you put in, you can't beat that genius with a 150 IQ in any exam despite the fact that they never do work or pay attention in class. That could easily be seen as unfair - I mean they can't change their IQ no matter what - it is all down to genes. Yet is it fair to have a sort of handicap, meaning that depending on your IQ, all your grades are levelled out? I mean, just because you are a genius, it doesn't take away from the fact that you knew every question on the test - so why should you lose marks? This is the same sort of dilemma as having a disability. Now, I believe, as do you, that disabilities should be allowed extra time to even out the playing field. I also believe that IQ should not be levelled out, maybe you diagree. Either way, we both have arguments for and against the IQ argument, and teh same is true with disabilites. Some people think that if you have disabilities, then that's just as bad as having a lower IQ - I disagree - so they are all valid opinions.

    Just my two cents.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Martins1)
    Could I just say that this clearly shows that you believe that hard work, knowledge and intelligence is what should be tested (I personally agree) - but not everyone agrees. As I said above, many people believe that exams should just be a test of what you can get done in a certain time limit and everything, including disabilites, is therefore being tested. You may not agree, in teh same way I disagree with that point of view, but it is a valid view and you should accept that.

    Imagine being someone who had a very low IQ - like to the point where it has "medical terminology". You would feel disadvantaged because no matter how much work you put in, you can't beat that genius with a 150 IQ in any exam despite the fact that they never do work or pay attention in class. That could easily be seen as unfair - I mean they can't change their IQ no matter what - it is all down to genes. Yet is it fair to have a sort of handicap, meaning that depending on your IQ, all your grades are levelled out? I mean, just because you are a genius, it doesn't take away from the fact that you knew every question on the test - so why should you lose marks? This is the same sort of dilemma as having a disability. Now, I believe, as do you, that disabilities should be allowed extra time to even out the playing field. I also believe that IQ should not be levelled out, maybe you diagree. Either way, we both have arguments for and against the IQ argument, and teh same is true with disabilites. Some people think that if you have disabilities, then that's just as bad as having a lower IQ - I disagree - so they are all valid opinions.

    Just my two cents.
    I respect your point of view and it is a very in depth debate that really cannot be solved with keeping or removing extra time alone, this debate could stem back to the reason we take exams in the first place. The link between IQ and A-Levels can be complex. Even with an extremely high IQ, I doubt you couldn't walk into any A-level exam and get full marks, (it really depends on what subject you take) yet someone with the lowest IQ could walk into any exam, having predicted and learnt the exact questions that may come up that year, and get a very high score. Standardised testing is flawed in many ways.

    But what would you propose instead of A-Levels? This is what it really comes down to! Theres so many arguments being thrown out on here but I am yet to hear an alternative that provides a realistic route through university.Even BTEC's aren't accepted in many top universities.

    An idea that has just come to my mind is something I discussed in my first post about extra time and it was about my ICT exam. My ICT exam is two and a half hours long and it is worth 80/90 marks AS/A-Level. I didn't need extra time on this exam and I scored a very high grade. The questions are worth low marks but obviously add up. This may show that this is probably quite a suitable type of exam for me if I didn't need to use my extra time. Does this mean that we should all take exams where the question style naturally suits us better or should we choose subjects that we are most interested in?
    I always loved maths and it was one of my best subjects, I didn't take it for A-level as I preferred my other subjects but maybe I should have due to the short nature of the questions? I don't know? But maybe adding a wider range of subjects at A-level would reduce the need for people like me needing extra time, provided the time frames and question styles were reasonable?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tinka99)
    I have learning difficulties and sitting my GCSE's this year and if I did not get 25% extra time, a reader and a quieter room I would fail as I generally am disadvantaged.
    You would join legions of people who fail
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by V ugvg jhi)
    You would join legions of people who fail
    I am predicted 5A's and 5B's for GCSE.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Also, more people in private schools get extra time.Just another way to disadvantage those not from the upper class.The system is being abused by the private schools, and doesn't reflect how things would be in real life. Many people who know how to fail the test deliberately do so, to make sure they get the time without deserving it.



    SCRAP EXTRA TIME!!!!!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tinka99)
    I am predicted 5A's and 5B's for GCSE.
    I am predicted 8A*s and 4 A's(and I am not the the smartest in my year) so your grades aren't a big deal.Secondly, YOU said you would fail, without extra time.

    Don't blame me for what you said.Really, extra time should just be abolished.If I knew when I was being tested by disabilities, I would have gotten extra time too. The system is subject to widespread cheating, and it is easier to be rid of it.
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by V ugvg jhi)
    Also, more people in private schools get extra time.Just another way to disadvantage those not from the upper class.The system is being abused by the private schools, and doesn't reflect how things would be in real life. Many people who know how to fail the test deliberately do so, to make sure they get the time without deserving it.



    SCRAP EXTRA TIME!!!!!
    *Working class, there's no such thing as "Class".....If you work for a living, you're working class personally
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
    Useful resources

    Study tools

    Rosette

    Essay expert

    Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

    Thinking about uni already?

    Thinking about uni already?

    See where you can apply with our uni match tool

    Student chat

    Ask a question

    Chat to other GCSE students and get your study questions answered.

    Creating

    Make study resources

    Create all the resources you need to get the grades.

    Planner

    Create your own Study Plan

    Organise all your homework and exams so you never miss another deadline.

    Resources by subject

    From flashcards to mind maps; there's everything you need for all of your GCSE subjects.

    Papers

    Find past papers

    100s of GCSE past papers for all your subjects at your fingertips.

    Help out other students

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.