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Edexcel Government & Politics - Unit 2 Governing the UK (09/06/16) Watch

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    Could you say that the Tories don't want a codified constitution but want a British BOR bc our sovereignty is pooled by the EU as the HRA is binded to the ECHR
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    (Original post by xxvine)
    Your like a politics dictionary lol
    😂😂😂


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    (Original post by xxvine)
    Your like a politics dictionary lol
    The 600 MPs thing was part of the Tory manifesto
    Has it actually been passed?
    No not yet they're still tryna get it done by 2020 so it's even more contemporary to mention it 😁


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    (Original post by guppal21)
    Could you say that the Tories don't want a codified constitution but want a British BOR bc our sovereignty is pooled by the EU as the HRA is binded to the ECHR
    For sure I wouldn't argue with that
    But even if we did have our on bor and are still in the eu we would still have pooled sovereignty just so ya know (you probs do)


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    Here is a table on the +ve and -ve of House of Lord Reform
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  1. File Type: docx HOUSE+OF+LORDS+REFORM+TABLE.docx (24.7 KB, 61 views)
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    I was thinking...maybe they'd word it differently for where sovereignty gone, something like to what extent is the uk still a unitary constitution? Or to what extent is the uk a federal constitution...tell me ya thoughts


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    This pre chewed politics article is so useful for examples and for/against arguments for 'Does the HofL need further reform'
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  2. File Type: pdf does_the_house_of_lords_need_further_reform_2016.pdf (93.9 KB, 46 views)
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    (Original post by guppal21)
    How would you answer: "Analyse the main factors that limit the effectiveness of Parliament."
    I'd talk about these factors -

    > The presence of a coalition
    > The size of the government's majority
    > The unity of the government
    > The strength of the Lords

    All of these can limit the effectiveness of parliament (lack of party unity, for example, may mean more backbench rebellions or a difficulty in agreeing on policies - limits ability to produce legislation).
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    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    I was thinking...maybe they'd word it differently for where sovereignty gone, something like to what extent is the uk still a unitary constitution? Or to what extent is the uk a federal constitution...or could it not be an essay as it's practically only referring to devolution....tell me ya thoughts


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    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    I was thinking...maybe they'd word it differently for where sovereignty gone, something like to what extent is the uk still a unitary constitution? Or to what extent is the uk a federal constitution...tell me ya thoughts


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    what paragraphs would you do for that
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    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    I was thinking...maybe they'd word it differently for where sovereignty gone, something like to what extent is the uk still a unitary constitution? Or to what extent is the uk a federal constitution...tell me ya thoughts


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    I don't know just seems like repetition of last years question which was 'To what extent does Parliament remain sovereign' or something. For unitary constitution/federal that's just regarding devolution which just seems too narrow for a 40 mark question
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    (Original post by kayemma)
    what paragraphs would you do for that
    I thought it would be possible but i don't think it is 😅 there's only devolution to talk about my bad ignore me


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    (Original post by alevelpain)
    I don't know just seems like repetition of last years question which was 'To what extend does Parliament remain sovereign' or something. For unitary constitution/federal that's just regarding devolution which just seems too narrow for a 40 mark question
    Yeah okay thanks for clarifying it, I didn't know for sure if unitary and federal just meant internal country factors..so it's practically impossible to have an essay question on it cause there's only devolution to talk about


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    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    Yeah okay thanks for clarifying it, I didn't know for sure if unitary and federal just meant internal country factors..so it's practically impossible to have an essay question on it cause there's only devolution to talk about


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    I think that post 2010 proposed/actual reform could happen would be a nice question I think
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    (Original post by alevelpain)
    I think that post 2010 proposed/actual reform could happen would be a nice question I think
    It would, but it would most probably refer to the successes and failures of those reforms


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    (Original post by Student 1305)
    This pre chewed politics article is so useful for examples and for/against arguments for 'Does the HofL need further reform'
    Statistics with the lords are so annoying , out of the 800 odd only 400 turn up regularly , 50 or so are suspended for various reasons (including normal holiday)
    Theres an interesting article somewhere about how its actually more representative than the commons (out of those who attend) something like 35% women compared to 29% of female MPs (the speaker of the lords is also female)
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    Well, a unitary constitution refers to the concentration of sovereign power within one body of national government.

    The main things which spring to mind for me when talking about it not being unitary, include the establishment of devolved governments in Wales, NI and Scotland, and the 'pooled sovereignty' with 27 other EU members.

    - Could you also argue that the establishment of the supreme court under the Constitutional Reform Act of 2005 takes power away from Parliament?

    - Perhaps talk about the increased use of referendums, which distributes power to the electorate who would possess sovereignty because they are the decision-makers, as opposed to elected representatives in Parliament?

    Tough question.

    Edit: Looking at what you guys said above, I'm pretty sure I'm wrong on most of those points. Devolution seems like the only solid one to talk about.
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    (Original post by UKStudent17)
    Well, a unitary constitution refers to the concentration of sovereign power within one body of national government.

    The main things which spring to mind for me when talking about it not being unitary, include the establishment of devolved governments in Wales, NI and Scotland, and the 'pooled sovereignty' with 27 other EU members.

    - Could you also argue that the establishment of the supreme court under the Constitutional Reform Act of 2005 takes power away from Parliament?

    - Perhaps talk about the increased use of referendums, which distributes power to the electorate who would possess sovereignty because they are the decision-makers, as opposed to elected representatives in Parliament?

    Tough question.
    That's what I was thinking, popular sovereignty could defiantly be included as to some extent the people do have the power...or political sovereignty where the government realistically has the power
    You're right it is a tough question...but I'm glad I thought of it if that **** comes up so we all won't be screwed if the 1% it can come up it does
    Cheers for your in put too ...do you think then there's a chance it could come up?


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    (Original post by Anonymous789)
    yes ur right thanks. and for the five marker it wouldnt be correct to mention the two types of pressure groups would it. i mentioned quite a lot for it. i remember mentioning sectional and promotional groups and what they do with examples like the confederation of british industry and explaining what it does etc but they wouldnt be considered functions would they??
    Well, if you wrote about the sectional/promotional groups in a way that highlighted their functions then it could be credited. For example, representation is a function and if you mentioned that the functions of pressure groups can depend on the type of pressure group they are then you should be good. As a function of sectional pressure groups is to represent a specific section of society and the interests of their members (example) whilst a function of promotional groups is to represent an often singular issue that is seen to be in the national interest (example)

    However, other functions if you mentioned these include education, participation etc


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    (Original post by UKStudent17)
    Well, a unitary constitution refers to the concentration of sovereign power within one body of national government.

    The main things which spring to mind for me when talking about it not being unitary, include the establishment of devolved governments in Wales, NI and Scotland, and the 'pooled sovereignty' with 27 other EU members.

    - Could you also argue that the establishment of the supreme court under the Constitutional Reform Act of 2005 takes power away from Parliament?

    - Perhaps talk about the increased use of referendums, which distributes power to the electorate who would possess sovereignty because they are the decision-makers, as opposed to elected representatives in Parliament?

    Tough question.

    Edit: Looking at what you guys said above, I'm pretty sure I'm wrong on most of those points. Devolution seems like the only solid one to talk about.
    The only way the Constitutional Reform Act took away powers from the PM was by replacing the PM appointing judicial appointments to the JAC
 
 
 
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