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    (Original post by kiss_me_now9)
    Hi

    I'm doing a Japanese module as wild credits on my Uni course (German, lol) and I was wondering if anyone could check my very basic sentances? I've got an assesment on Tuesday and I'm bricking it. I can just about recognise probably 10 - 20 characters in Hiragana, no Kanji yet. We've been told to learn the characters ourselves (in three weeks!) and that our teacher isn't going to sit down and go through it with us, it's all down to us.
    For learning kana, try this http://learnkana.vahtera.org/

    Also, I started learning kanji from 'Teach Yourself: Japanese Script' which I'm finding brilliant. It goes through it step by step and relates how they look like what they describe. Different things will work for different people but I would highly recommend that

    Good luck!
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    Hi!

    At the moment I'm learning basic Japanese and have just looked at how to use い and な adjectives. From what I can gather, if you take of the な it becomes a noun. However, I'm under the impression you can't just add な to any noun in order to make it an adjective. So how do you change nouns into adjectives?

    E.g. If I wanted to turn heaven into heavenly, it wouldn't be 天国 > 天国な would it?
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    (Original post by Ezikio)
    Hi!

    At the moment I'm learning basic Japanese and have just looked at how to use い and な adjectives. From what I can gather, if you take of the な it becomes a noun. However, I'm under the impression you can't just add な to any noun in order to make it an adjective. So how do you change nouns into adjectives?

    E.g. If I wanted to turn heaven into heavenly, it wouldn't be 天国 > 天国な would it?
    No...

    Its 天国的な

    When you turn certain nouns into adjectives you need 的.

    国際 - international
    国際的な銀行 - an international bank.
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    Thanks... one more thing though.

    So you can use it as a noun modifier > 天国的な花。 Rubbish example but you get the idea.

    But what if I wanted to use it to describe something already mentioned? For example with an ordinary な adjective you would say: 花はきれいです。 You just drop the な.
    When using 的 would you do the same(just drop the な ):" 花は天国的です。"?
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    (Original post by Ezikio)
    Thanks... one more thing though.

    So you can use it as a noun modifier > 天国的な花。 Rubbish example but you get the idea.

    But what if I wanted to use it to describe something already mentioned? For example with an ordinary な adjective you would say: 花はきれいです。 You just drop the な.
    When using 的 would you do the same(just drop the な ):" 花は天国的です。"?
    No. You drop 的. Although your example doesn't make any sense by using that type of construction. The purpose of 的 is to avoid such constructions in Japanese.

    その花は天国的な花です。
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    Bumped for the truth. Cos you can't handle the truth that Japan is awesome. :cool:
    • Thread Starter
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    <3 いちばん!


    Ahem
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    私たちは日本が大好き!^^ (that's about the extent of my Japanese so don't expect much more from me!)

    Oh, one quick question - how do you say "Merry Christmas" or "Happy New Year" (since I know they don't really bother with christmas). I was planning on putting it in my cards this year but I can't even begin to guess at how to translate those so I thought here would be the best place to ask
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    (Original post by Natsuko)
    私たちは日本が大好き!^^ (that's about the extent of my Japanese so don't expect much more from me!)

    Oh, one quick question - how do you say "Merry Christmas" or "Happy New Year" (since I know they don't really bother with christmas). I was planning on putting it in my cards this year but I can't even begin to guess at how to translate those so I thought here would be the best place to ask
    Happy New Year is;

    明けましておめでとうございます
    Akemashite omedetou (gozaimasu)

    In Japan, new year is celebrated more than Christmas. Christmas is just a romantic holiday for friends and couples. Its just katakana I think;

    メリークリスマス! or actually maybe they say Happy instead, seeing as that word has more of a direct association in Japan.
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    (Original post by gaijin)
    Happy New Year is;

    明けましておめでとうございます
    Akemashite omedetou (gozaimasu)

    In Japan, new year is celebrated more than Christmas. Christmas is just a romantic holiday for friends and couples. Its just katakana I think;

    メリークリスマス! or actually maybe they say Happy instead, seeing as that word has more of a direct association in Japan.
    Ah, ok thanks! I'll go with just happy new year since it's more "authentic" Japanese. And I won't need ございます because it's for friends, ね? Can you explain the vocabulary to me in that sentence so that I can learn from it?

    ありがとうございます!
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    (Original post by gaijin)
    Bumped for the truth. Cos you can't handle the truth that Japan is awesome. :cool:
    Thought you hated Japan? :O
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    (Original post by kimoso)
    Thought you hated Japan? :O
    Just because you hate Japan doesn't necessarily mean you can't think its awesome.
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    That's true I guess. Btw, I have an offer from Sheffield now :^_^:
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    (Original post by Natsuko)
    Ah, ok thanks! I'll go with just happy new year since it's more "authentic" Japanese. And I won't need ございます because it's for friends, ね? Can you explain the vocabulary to me in that sentence so that I can learn from it?

    ありがとうございます!
    Gozaimasu is like a very polite form of the verb gozaru - which is 'to be'... Its used in the same way as desu. I wouldn't worry about it as its a set-phrase in Japanese to express politeness. You'll hear people when they want to be very polite say gozaimasen instead of ja arimasen and gozaimashita instead of deshita

    Definitely when I've gone to some restaurants in Tokyo the waiter used gozaimasu instead of desu.
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    (Original post by gaijin)
    Gozaimasu is like a very polite form of the verb gozaru - which is 'to be'... Its used in the same way as desu. I wouldn't worry about it as its a set-phrase in Japanese to express politeness. You'll hear people when they want to be very polite say gozaimasen instead of ja arimasen and gozaimashita instead of deshita

    Definitely when I've gone to some restaurants in Tokyo the waiter used gozaimasu instead of desu.
    Ah yeah, that rings a bell. So, in a card to my friends I could just put "明けましておめでとう"? Or would the 明けまして have to be different? Or is it a set phrase... I'm just a beginner so bare with me! Thank-you :yep:
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    (Original post by Natsuko)
    Ah yeah, that rings a bell. So, in a card to my friends I could just put "明けましておめでとう"? Or would the 明けまして have to be different? Or is it a set phrase... I'm just a beginner so bare with me! Thank-you :yep:
    Hey, did you get an interview from Clare?
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    (Original post by kimoso)
    Hey, did you get an interview from Clare?
    Naw :no: obviously wasn't meant to be ^^ but my friend got the same grades as me but higher UMS marks in total and she got an interview at Clare for Goegraphy on Wed ...I think! Did you?
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    (Original post by Natsuko)
    Naw :no: obviously wasn't meant to be ^^ but my friend got the same grades as me but higher UMS marks in total and she got an interview at Clare for Goegraphy on Wed ...I think! Did you?
    Aw, sorry to hear that . Yep I did. Monday :^^:
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    (Original post by kimoso)
    Aw, sorry to hear that . Yep I did. Monday :^^:
    Lol don't worry I'm long past even being disapointed :p: optimist me! Aww good luck!!! I'll be thinking of you Although everyone's interviews seem to be next week so forgive me if I can't spare much thought :p: Just imagine your interviewers naked... aparently it works :confused:
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    Hahahaha I'll keep that in mind :wink2:

    I've already got an offer from the uni I want to go to anyway so I'm not all that bothered.
 
 
 
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