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    (Original post by tory88)
    The key is to not show that any of it bothers you. Laugh it off, or make a quick joke; alternatively, "we can talk about that after school if you wish, but right now you should be doing xxx" works really well.

    I prefer teaching boys, as their disruption tends to be more in-your-face and if they fall out they have a fight then go and play football. The feuds among girls is much less straightforward to deal with, in my opinion.
    I agree. In primary all it takes is 'you hurt her feeling. Please look at her and say sorry.' After that, all is forgotten.


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    (Original post by Sam89)
    Hiya guys,

    Seeking a little advise here as usual.

    I went to see my school for placement 2 recently and I have personally been to an all girls school and my first placement was also at an all girls school.

    Now I observed at my second school (mixed), boys can generally be more cheeky - and say the oddest things - can anyone give me tips on how to make this transition smoothly and not be so 'overwhelmed'/'taken aback'. Especially in terms of behaviour.

    I wish we didn't need to move schools - this school is so hospital like and clinical left me thinking where is that ''school'' feeling I feel in my current school!
    Having just had my first placement in an all-girls and my next placement being all boys, I kinda sympathise with you!

    My plan is to just go in stern - certainly sterner than I did in placement 1.
    Set out your expectations in your first lessons with them and be consistent from the offset.
    The most effective thing I've found is making sure they all have their planners on their desks so that if I need to know their name/don't have my seating plan/they're misbehaving, it's easy for me to get their planner without an argument.
    Following on from that, depending on the time period, keeping the entire class in works as does having a 'warning' box on the whiteboard and simply writing names in their - their name is the warning, if they get a tick next to their name, they've got a detention.
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    (Original post by Sam89)
    Hiya guys,

    Seeking a little advise here as usual.

    I went to see my school for placement 2 recently and I have personally been to an all girls school and my first placement was also at an all girls school.

    Now I observed at my second school (mixed), boys can generally be more cheeky - and say the oddest things - can anyone give me tips on how to make this transition smoothly and not be so 'overwhelmed'/'taken aback'. Especially in terms of behaviour.

    I wish we didn't need to move schools - this school is so hospital like and clinical left me thinking where is that ''school'' feeling I feel in my current school!
    Be prepared for silliness and laziness, but those are probably going to be the main two battles (less of the girls who just ignore you/look at you like you're dirt/smile sweetly at you then do the exact opposite of what you asked them to). I teach an all-boys class in Year 11 (my school is mixed, but Y11 is very imbalanced) and they're hard work but I absolutely love them.

    They really can say the oddest things!You have to absolutely take a "water off a duck's back" approach to some of the stuff they come out with too. Play the "I'm the adult, I've seen it all before, and nothing shocks me anymore" role, unless it's something really bad.

    If they are saying things that are treally inappropriate, I would say you're going to have to go in quite strict and make an example of some of them. I would initially come down on it like a tonne of bricks - "Get OUT of my classroom", etc., make them stand outside for a couple of minutes before you talk to them. Depending on your school's behaviour system you may also need to issue a sanction.

    A line I sometimes take with pupils I'm new to teaching is to send them into the corridor, have a right go at them, tell them it should be a "remove" (highest sanction available to me in my school - kicked out of the lesson, phonecall home and after school detention) but that as perhaps they did not know my expectations yet, on this one occasion it will only be a [lesser sanction - 10 minutes detention with me and warning logged on SIMS]. That way I've made my point that it's unacceptable and told them what the consequences will be next time, but also been generous to them, hopefully contributing to a positive relationship.

    As you get to know them more (and get used to teenage boys' humour!) you can start to resolve things through banter, which can lead to less conflict in the classroom whilst still calming behaviour down (so long as you clamp down on other pupils constantly joining in the banter). For example, a Y8 pupil of mine seemed to enjoy making what he thought were sex/orgasm noises at random intervals. I knew this pupil pretty well having taught him since Y7, so on one occasion I responded "I had no idea you found past tense verbs so exciting", and he shut right up!

    Banter/piss-taking works really well with certain groups, once you get to know them. I have a particular Year 11 pupil who is extremely volatile (SEBD) and really can't handle being in the wrong. When I use the behaviour system (even just a warning/name on the board) it generally escalates pretty badly, whereas with humour I can normally get him back on task.

    It can be hard work, but teaching boys can be great fun too, so enjoy the opportunity.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    Great, thanks for the indication. I struggle to understand how to show my own view because in my first essay I basically described the behaviourist learning theory with references to literature and then the second half was how I've used it in teaching practice (it was supposed to be that way). I got criticised for being too descriptive and told it wouldn't pass but I did include my own opinion heavily, and he recognised that but said I can't just state my own opinion without reference to literature. So I was confused because how am I supposed to talk about my own opinion if it has to be referenced?! It's not my own opinion then!

    For this essay I have to evaluate two learning theories so I'm doing behaviourism and cognitivism, and at the moment my attempt to make it an analysis is basically doing things like "an advantage of behaviourism is X (annoying academic 1, 2008), however annoying academic 2 (2001) disagreed with this as...". But it still feels descriptive! I don't know how to avoid it and be analytical. All I want is 50 so I can pass :lol: .
    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    I did pretty well with this stuff last year, without giving over too much time.

    For the assignment you describe I would do:

    The bahviourist view of x is blah blah (references). the constructivist view is blah (references ). In my own obersevations and practice i have found (ideally stating here that one or the other approach has worked better for you). My experiences would suggest that xxx is because (and here you will reflect on why things have worked or not worked, how you will move forward, what you might adapt etc. Give specific examples of occasions when you have used aspects of particular theories and how/why they worked out for you).

    Obviously I haven't seen your full brief, but I did an assignment reflecting on different teaching and learning theories in this way and got a very high level 7.
    Very good answer

    It's about finding that formula and using it.

    I always think of it in terms of links. The way you're not just describing but still using references is by making links between what the references say and your own practice, or between the different references... Not just saying they both say this/think the opposite, but maybe one theory could be applied to something another person said.

    It's a pain to describe/wrap your head around I know. Try not to become preoccupied with how many references you use because the acceptable range is quite big. When the idea of referencing was first explained to me (in 6th form) it was done so terribly, I was told every sentence must be referenced (down to the introduction and conclusion) and given half a referencing system, and not told anything about how to use the references.

    Xxx

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    (Original post by alabelle)
    We've been advised 20-25 for a 5,000 word essay.

    (Original post by Samus2)
    I was surprised when I came to uni and we had a lecture on how to write an essay. For a 4,000 word essay, we were told the average amount of work used within the essay was between 4-6 pieces and about 10-20 references within the text
    I'm seriously worried about not passing this essay, I've never before thought that an essay might genuinely fail but eurgh, stress. At least I can resubmit.


    Hah, yeah, a few people I know are making theirs up too.

    (Original post by TraineeLynsey)
    I did pretty well with this stuff last year, without giving over too much time.

    For the assignment you describe I would do:

    The bahviourist view of x is blah blah (references). the constructivist view is blah (references ). In my own obersevations and practice i have found (ideally stating here that one or the other approach has worked better for you). My experiences would suggest that xxx is because (and here you will reflect on why things have worked or not worked, how you will move forward, what you might adapt etc. Give specific examples of occasions when you have used aspects of particular theories and how/why they worked out for you).

    Obviously I haven't seen your full brief, but I did an assignment reflecting on different teaching and learning theories in this way and got a very high level 7.
    (Original post by kpwxx)
    Very good answer

    It's about finding that formula and using it.

    I always think of it in terms of links. The way you're not just describing but still using references is by making links between what the references say and your own practice, or between the different references... Not just saying they both say this/think the opposite, but maybe one theory could be applied to something another person said.

    It's a pain to describe/wrap your head around I know. Try not to become preoccupied with how many references you use because the acceptable range is quite big. When the idea of referencing was first explained to me (in 6th form) it was done so terribly, I was told every sentence must be referenced (down to the introduction and conclusion) and given half a referencing system, and not told anything about how to use the references.

    Xxx

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    Thanks for all your help! Seems to be a big range of answers here so I guess it depends on who is marking it. I think I'm going to aim for 20 :dontknow: . And thanks Lynsey and kpwxx, helps a lot. I've written the first half and got my boyfriend to read it last night and he said it reads analytically, and he has a PhD so I'd like to think he knows if it's okay for not :lol: .

    hoping to finish the bulk of the essay today! Loaded with energy drinks and snacks.


    (Original post by Sam89)
    Hiya guys,

    Seeking a little advise here as usual.

    I went to see my school for placement 2 recently and I have personally been to an all girls school and my first placement was also at an all girls school.

    Now I observed at my second school (mixed), boys can generally be more cheeky - and say the oddest things - can anyone give me tips on how to make this transition smoothly and not be so 'overwhelmed'/'taken aback'. Especially in terms of behaviour.

    I wish we didn't need to move schools - this school is so hospital like and clinical left me thinking where is that ''school'' feeling I feel in my current school!
    I can imagine how scary this must be! To be honest, there are pros and cons for teaching boys or girls. Boys may be cheeky but girls can be *****y and just outright drama queens. I think I preferred the boys in my classes as the girls just whined all the time and annoyed me haha. I can't give you much advice, but try not to view gender as a massive transition you have to get used to. They are all kids at the end of the day, and what one boy says by being cheeky, another girl may also say. You've also got to remember that this is a totally new school, so all the kids may be a little different.

    You'll get used to it fast, I'm sure. Within a month you'll forget that boys were presenting a barrier for you. Plus, even though you might have wanted to stay at your old school, the experience of teaching mixed will help a lot, as I'm sure you know.
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    I honestly haven't found boys to be that bad. The girls in my last placement were horrendous! They knew exactly how to wind each other up :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by ParadoxSocks)
    I've somehow decided to add to the tiredness and stress of a PGCE by proposing to my girlfriend yesterday. I think I might have to put the main wedding plans off for a while...



    I have a one day primary placement next week focusing on tasks that will get girls into computing (as though we magically know the answers?) and I'm absolutely terrified!



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    Congratulations!!!! And don't worry, I had a two day primary placement back in September. I had an absolute blast! I got to know the pupils and had a chat with the teachers who were so lovely and supportive, I even was considering teaching primary for a moment as I really loved my time in primary school.


    Oh and by the way, I had to shadow one pupil at lunch time as one of my tasks set by my uni. I ended up playing a game of football :-)

    Good luck and enjoy yourself, you're not there forever!!
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    (Original post by Ratchit99)
    Ive been doing some reading for my essay but as im between placements I dont have marking or planning to do (thank god).
    Anyone else been accosted by there gp for a flu jab, i went in for something unrelated to that and the doc was like, ah your a teacher your in the recommended group for a flu jab...
    The flu jab does not prevent the flu. Every year they say that the manufacturer has not guessed the right strain for it to be effective. Canadian study said the flu jab is not effective for that reason, and actually lowers your immune system by half. Therefore, making you more susceptible to getting ill from any nasty bug that is going around that year.
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    (Original post by Red Lightning)
    Congratulations!!!! And don't worry, I had a two day primary placement back in September. I had an absolute blast! I got to know the pupils and had a chat with the teachers who were so lovely and supportive, I even was considering teaching primary for a moment as I really loved my time in primary school.


    Oh and by the way, I had to shadow one pupil at lunch time as one of my tasks set by my uni. I ended up playing a game of football :-)

    Good luck and enjoy yourself, you're not there forever!!
    Thanks We have a week long primary placement later in the year. This is just a weird thing where 5 of the trainees go in together and help to teach a lesson and we've had very little information about it. I'd feel better if I knew what was actually happening.
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    Just submitted my first assigment :/ hope i manage to pass!!
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    Missed two uni days last week because I was feeling really rough, and now I'm going to be 40 minutes late for a 4 hour class because traffic exploded and I had to get the train instead.

    I have a disability thing in place that allows me to be late but it doesn't really do much for the lecturer/student relationship



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    (Original post by ParadoxSocks)
    Missed two uni days last week because I was feeling rough, and now I'm going to be 40 minutes late for a 4 hour class because traffic exploded and I had to get the train instead.

    I have a disability thing in place that allows me to be late but it doesn't do much for the lecturer/student relationship



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    Oh no! That sucks, i hope you got there ok in the end?
    If its any consolation ive had a tummy bug for a few days, left uni early on friday and hardly slept last night. Managed to get into my new placement school this morning and attend all our meetings and meet the relevant people etc and then professional mentor and head of my department took sympathy and said to come home this afternoon and rest so that i was 100% for when my timetable starts still feel rubbish for having done that
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    Urk, my placement school has the dreaded 'O' word coming in tomorrow and Wednesday. It seems oddly serene, but I can't say I'm looking forward to it. Hey well - I guess it's something to put on my application forms!
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    Hmph. Next week at uni was listed as a spare week, and last time that happened we had the week off, so people have booked to go away and stuff. Anyway they've filled it with stuff. It doesn't bother me being in uni and not having the week off but I hate it when it's obvious they don't have anything to actually do next week and are just filling it with useless stuff just so we don't have free time.
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    Second placement starts tomorrow eeeek I'm goin from excellent all girls school to your average mixed comp...... I don't know how to teach boys!!!! Lol
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    (Original post by Lucy_jucie)
    Second placement starts tomorrow eeeek I'm goin from excellent all girls school to your average mixed comp...... I don't know how to teach boys!!!! Lol
    This has been discussed a bit further up on the page/last page.

    Boys are great! There will be some new challenges but if you're prepared for them and able to adapt I hope you enjoy your placement.
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    Im redoing a presentation today because I failed it first time around because I was ill. I'm worried I'm going to fail it again as I only had about half an hour's sleep last night; ironically because I was worrying about today!

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    Second day back at uni today and I'm already flailing. No energy and assignments to think about...
    BUT I have my induction for a SEN placement tomorrow which I'm excited for as that's the area of teaching I eventually want to go into. :-)
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    I hate being at uni :/

    Today I was sat in a morning seminar and just felt like you do when you're on the edge of tears. I feel really low at the moment and my anxiety is sky high. So I went home. And I'm not going in tomorrow. I don't care anymore.
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    Sounds like my sort of thread
 
 
 
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