Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IdeasForLife)
    Yep. These militias are crazy. Mosul's only hope is if the Turks backstab the Iraqis and their militia friends, doubt anything of that sort will happen though.
    I wouldn't advocate that, it will only pour more oil into the messy fire that is iraq.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Al-farhan)
    There are large sunni tribal militias that were wanting to join the mousil offensive (trained by the turks) I'm not sure if they have joined though, since Baghdad ruled only the army and Peshmerga to carry the offensive.
    Tbh it would be difficult for the Iraqi government to manage so many groups with independent interests all fighting in one region - the power vaccuum once they have ousted ISIS would likely cause the different groups to fight each other in order to secure control of Mosul :holmes:
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Zamestaneh)
    Tbh it would be difficult for the Iraqi government to manage so many groups with independent interests all fighting in one region - the power vaccuum once they have ousted ISIS would likely cause the different groups to fight each other in order to secure control of Mosul :holmes:
    True.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Zamestaneh)
    Because it's a sectarian conflict which has been raging on since before ISIS - after the Iraq war, a number of the disillusioned Sunni soldiers who had been dispanded joined resistence groups and terror groups. These groups fought against government and occupying forces, as well as Shia militia in the south. Some of these groups would bomb Shia populated areas, shrines etc, and equally these militia would carry out retalition attacks. When ISIS formed out of one of these terror groups, they simply carried on doing what they had been doing for years i.e. attacking Shia. The Shia militia used to be smaller, but as ISIS has grown, they have received increasing amounts of funding and arms from Iran, and therefore they have grown massively, and it is arguable that they have more power than the official Iraqi army; their longstanding grudges remained the same, thus they carry out attacks and abuses in retaliation on a larger scale now, and again, it's not limited to killing ISIS and its supporters, because this is a pre-ISIS grudge.

    Because of this hatred and suspicion, it is not abnormal for the Iraqi soldiers and militia troops to have contempt for the people they are 'liberating' - if they aren't ISIS soldiers, then they are ISIS supporters in their eyes, and if they aren't ISIS supporters, then well tough luck I guess.
    Ohhh, I see I see it all makes sense now thank you. SubhanAllah, the poor civilians suffering because of all this nonesense. May Allah facilitate their situation.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    15
    May Allah protect us from fitna and bless His mercy on us. Ameen.

    https://youtu.be/aH6Qu-UtV8M
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IdeasForLife)
    Unfortunately it's going to get worse. These militias and parts of the Iraqi army are as bad as ISIS. Only difference is ISIS hates shias and these guys hate sunnis. Their time will run out and then all these groups and organisations will have to face the consequences of their actions before their Lord.
    I never knew an Iraqi army existed, I'm shocked, and I agree. I don't get why a lot of countries are becoming so sectarian or do I just don't know this has been happening in Iraq before?
    InshaAllah.
    Offline

    15
    (Original post by beautifulxxx)
    Ohhh, I see I see it all makes sense now thank you. SubhanAllah, the poor civilians suffering because of all this nonesense. May Allah facilitate their situation.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Ameen.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Al-farhan)
    It will just be a repeat of what happened in Falloujah.
    Where even those fleeing didn't escape. I remember seeing a video of an entire convoy of civilians burned to crisp which shows the charred remains of a child hugging their parent in one of the pickups. I don't watch graphics things and wasn't expecting to see that image, but when I saw. I couldn't sleep for days, it disturbed me.
    OMD I feel very sad just imagining it.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by beautifulxxx)
    Ohhh, I see I see it all makes sense now thank you. SubhanAllah, the poor civilians suffering because of all this nonesense. May Allah facilitate their situation.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Ameen.
    Offline

    15
    (Original post by Leukocyte)
    OMD I feel very sad just imagining it.
    I was watching the news before and I was telling my parents how everything is getting worse in Iraq and Syria. And they were sad too and recalled the never ending war in Afghanistan and the hard times the people went through there and are still going through now as a consequence. Such a mess.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by beautifulxxx)
    If ISIS is killing shias and they're aware of that why aren't they killing them back instead of attacking sunnis..?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    They do kill ISIS but they also aim for normal sunnis. These Iranian backed shia militias are just full of extreme hate. Saddam used to oppress the shia and the kurds. When the Americans took over, they put the shia in power, then some shia went for revenge on sunnis (because of what happened before). So it's stupid hatred. Then sunnis would kill them etc... The cycle of killing keeps on going with innocents being caught in the middle. Zam explained this well.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Leukocyte)
    I never knew an Iraqi army existed, I'm shocked, and I agree. I don't get why a lot of countries are becoming so sectarian or do I just don't know this has been happening in Iraq before?
    InshaAllah.
    It's not a very good army, probably not good morally or good in actual strength. This stuff did happen in the Iraq war (and in Saddam's era before that) but most of us would've been kids and kids don't pick up on this stuff. Only later I read up on these things and thought wow all these things happened. They're probably going to repeat again tbh because once those militias have done their killing in Mosul and elsewhere, you'll certainly get some sunnis who will retaliate eventually for their family or friends etc that were murdered. And some of those sunnis will go into the extremes like the militia.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by h333)
    I was watching the news before and I was telling my parents how everything is getting worse in Iraq and Syria. And they were sad too and recalled the never ending war in Afghanistan and the hard times the people went through there and are still going through now as a consequence. Such a mess.
    I was just talking to dad about this after I finished cleaning when the guests left, shared the article with him. Yeah subhanAllah dad mentioned an attack that happened in Afghanistan and it was done by shias, they targeted sunnis in the masjid.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Al-farhan)
    I wouldn't advocate that, it will only pour more oil into the messy fire that is iraq.
    True igy. But idk, I'd prefer the turks (and their allies) over Baghdad and Iranian backed militias.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by IdeasForLife)
    It's not a very good army, probably not good morally or good in actual strength. This stuff did happen in the Iraq war (and in Saddam's era before that) but most of us would've been kids and kids don't pick up on this stuff. Only later I read up on these things and thought wow all these things happened. They're probably going to repeat again tbh because once those militias have done their killing in Mosul and elsewhere, you'll certainly get some sunnis who will retaliate eventually for their family or friends etc that were murdered. And some of those sunnis will go into the extremes like the militia.
    Oh I see how this links in now. I will research more into this inshaAllah, thank you. I know I can imagine, it has happened before but I don't think it would be the best way bc they'd be going round in circles.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    It's not all bad. You get some positives from time to time.

    https://www.facebook.com/BroAbdullat...0793108413621/
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Leukocyte)
    Oh I see how this links in now. I will research more into this inshaAllah, thank you. I know I can imagine, it has happened before but I don't think it would be the best way bc they'd be going round in circles.
    You're welcome. Yeh this current cycle is stupid.
    Offline

    15
    (Original post by Leukocyte)
    I was just talking to dad about this after I finished cleaning when the guests left, shared the article with him. Yeah subhanAllah dad mentioned an attack that happened in Afghanistan and it was done by shias, they targeted sunnis in the masjid.
    Ya Allah have mercy on them. Ameen.
    Sis you know what is worse Iran is using Afghan men to fight for them in the war. Iran so wants to divide us.
    Offline

    18
    (Original post by Al-farhan)
    There are large sunni tribal militias that were wanting to join the mousil offensive (trained by the truks) I'm not sure if they have joined though, since Baghdad ruled only the army and Peshmerga to carry the offensive.
    They have joined the offensive: http://www.wsj.com/articles/islamic-...ive-1476642193.

    Unlike previous fights to dislodge Islamic State from Iraqi cities, this fight is the first time Iraq’s divided armed groups have been tasked with working together.

    In the weeks leading up to the battle, Iran-backed Shiite militias jockeyed for a more prominent role in the fight. They proved to be formidable soldiers in retaking other Iraqi cities, including Tikrit and Fallujah, earning political influence and popularity among Iraq’s Shiite majority.

    The militias’ demands followed a public spat between Turkey and the Baghdad government over the presence of Turkish troops near Mosul. Ankara’s insisted that its forces wouldn't withdraw, and would hold sway over the campaign to reclaim Mosul.

    But Iraqi Sunnis and the U.S. have tried to keep the militias away from Iraq’s Sunni heartland following allegations of widespread revenge killings and detentions of Sunni men the militias accuse of being Islamic State sympathizers.

    Eleventh-hour negotiations in early October by Mr. Abadi with the disparate armed groups restored the original battle plan, which calls for only Iraq’s military and allied Sunni tribal fighters to enter the city.
    Offline

    15
    (Original post by IdeasForLife)
    It's not all bad. You get some positives from time to time.

    https://www.facebook.com/BroAbdullat...0793108413621/
    Alhamdulillah
 
 
 
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: December 19, 2016
Poll
Do you think parents should charge rent?
Useful resources

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.