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    (Original post by Spartz)
    Anyone else do Emily Dickinson and The turn of the screw? I thought the poetry was okay but the turn of the screw was a bit sketchy

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    I did Emily Dickinson- Good poem what poems to linked it to? I did:

    Behind Me Dips Eternity
    My Life stood like a Loaded Gun
    This World is Not a conclusion

    The three main ones I quoted and compared and contrasted the main poem with..

    however didnt get around to doing a conclusion...(:mad:
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    (Original post by s7a0)
    For prose on structure- Bildungsroman & semi-autobiographical & structured through location/setting & narrated from a first-narrative point of few......................
    Damn! Of course... Wow, can't believe I forgot it.

    Anyway my other points were okay - do you agree?

    How far is Jane Eyre a novel about 'hunger, rage and rebellion'?

    Yes it is about hunger, rage and rebellion:


    • Hunger: Hunger physical (Lowood - not fed enough) and hunger for love/acceptance (Lowood - fits in, however, she is not fed enough, sacrifices physical fulfilment for emotional).
    • Rage: John Reed - calls him a "Roman emperor" and fights him. Can't remember what else I put
    • Rebellion: Rebellious towards authority figures (e.g. Mrs Reed, St John - refuses to marry him).




    No it's about other things:


    • Love: Rochester and Jane's love is so strong that Rochester threatens to use violence to ensure Jane hears "reason" after Bertha is discovered.
    • Gender: IMAGERY - Rochester's masculinity shown by the horse and "great dog" - Pilot.

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    (Original post by NiallD)
    Mine was like:

    Intro - Just introduced main points about how he presented a chaotic and disastrous image of the world changing etc

    Verse Form - Inconsistent meter and rhyme scheme to show the chaos - linked to The Cold Heaven. Talked about structure and how he moved from general to particular in stanza 1 to stanza 2, different from his other pomes such as In Memory of EGB and CM where he moves from particular to general so it shows something must be wrong etc

    Imagery - Mostly talked about the stone metaphor for consistency in 'twenty centuries of stony sleep' which is also used in Easter 1916 and The Man and The Echo. Also talked about how he uses sand as a metaphor for time running out in terms of the second coming occuring.

    Language - Talked about how the anaphora and epistrophe reflects his cyclical views about history, and the biblical semantic field to link to a new revolution. Also talked about the ambiguous language and lack of specifics and how it leads to fear of the unknown, and the dark semantic field connotes unclarity and ambiguity as well, and also stuff like how he refers to it as 'mere anarchy' which suggests something much worse will come after it.

    Conclusion - Summed up my ideas and talked about how the rhetorical question mark at the end adds some ambiguity to his views about the world changing, and said how he also does this in Wild Swans, Leda, Cold Heaven and Among Schoolchildren which reflects the complexity and ambiguity of some of his ideas.

    I think Yeats went well but I'm kinda worried that I approached Frankenstein completely wrongly. Could anyone who did the women question tell me what kinds of things they wrote?
    Good points What do you think of mine? I had to make them up
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    (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
    Damn! Of course... Wow, can't believe I forgot it.

    Anyway my other points were okay - do you agree?

    How far is Jane Eyre a novel about 'hunger, rage and rebellion'?

    Yes it is about hunger, rage and rebellion:


    • Hunger: Hunger physical (Lowood - not fed enough) and hunger for love/acceptance (Lowood - fits in, however, she is not fed enough, sacrifices physical fulfilment for emotional).
    • Rage: John Reed - calls him a "Roman emperor" and fights him. Can't remember what else I put
    • Rebellion: Rebellious towards authority figures (e.g. Mrs Reed, St John - refuses to marry him).




    No it's about other things:


    • Love: Rochester and Jane's love is so strong that Rochester threatens to use violence to ensure Jane hears "reason" after Bertha is discovered.
    • Gender: IMAGERY - Rochester's masculinity shown by the horse and "great dog" - Pilot.

    I quoted for hunger- Lust or Love for John--I said love not lust

    there are feminist, gothic-romantic readings of the novel also

    I did say it inclined towards what the critique said in my conclusion

    yes about 'great dog' i did quote that but stumbles so this eradicates his superiority over Jane ( dont remember how i linked that to the question but did)

    the novel is 'unique', a social critique/ goes against the conventions of the time hence wasnt a popular read up until now

    for rebellion- red room, jane as a passionate child and her counterpart Bertha Mason

    Relgion- Bronte's portrayal of it: Brocklehurst; 'black pillar', Helen-, does not last...

    also, for that I used a criticism of the novel- could be said to be ridiculing religion

    etcc

    i need 58/60 to get overall A in as..you?
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    (Original post by s7a0)
    I quoted for hunger- Lust or Love for John--I said love not lust

    there are feminist, gothic-romantic readings of the novel also

    I did say it inclined towards what the critique said in my conclusion

    yes about 'great dog' i did quote that but stumbles so this eradicates his superiority over Jane ( dont remember how i linked that to the question but did)

    the novel is 'unique', a social critique/ goes against the conventions of the time hence wasnt a popular read up until now

    for rebellion- red room, jane as a passionate child and her counterpart Bertha Mason

    Relgion- Bronte's portrayal of it: Brocklehurst; 'black pillar', Helen-, does not last...

    also, for that I used a criticism of the novel- could be said to be ridiculing religion

    etcc

    i need 58/60 to get overall A in as..you?
    I was aiming for a B but my points are pretty crap :P For a C I need 19 on each question - pretty achievable
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    (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
    Damn! Of course... Wow, can't believe I forgot it.

    Anyway my other points were okay - do you agree?

    How far is Jane Eyre a novel about 'hunger, rage and rebellion'?

    [B]Yes it is about hunger, rage and rebellion:


    [LIST][*]Hunger: Hunger physical (Lowood - not fed enough) and hunger for love/acceptance (Lowood - fits in, however, she is not fed enough, sacrifices physical fulfilment for emotional).
    i spoke about the opening- 'drear November' which is contrasted with the atmosphere in the Reed's family home and how it reflects Jane's emotions... she is searching for love... etc and her Bronte uses nature ....
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    Franky

    talked about his arrogance - linked it to Walton (double)
    biblical links to satan , like creature (double)


    counter arg
    twisted sexuality, freud, oedipus, repulsed by marriage - "union" - elizabeth suffers as he spurns her because of this - link to how he spurns creature too (double)

    context
    shelley - feminist, death of her children shaping views on birth
    englightenment - science new ideas

    other ao2
    load of quotes, intertexuality - milton

    basically said that hes arrogant yes, but his twisted sexuality is also key to why he artifically procreates

    yeats
    disorder, chaos, biblical imagery, gyre, easter 1916 - transition from not taking natioanlists seriously to all changed utterly, fisherman - the best lack all conviction, worst full of passionate intensity - clever man cries catch cries of the clown, irrationality of the worst - like irish airman's "impulse of delight" - irrationality key to rapid change. leda and the swan - both poems start off heavily stressed and somewhat in media res although that applies more to second coming - in the last second made a brief link to cold heaven - "insidious desert birds" "rook delighting heaven" - darkness.

    think i explored language well with yeats, disorder reflected by trochaic pentameter, biblical imagery, unconventional take on sonnet the octave volta but then fourteen lines rather than setset. the lion's a badass etc

    all in all i had a lot of ideas with the two questions which i was happy with only worried may have not strucutred it fluidly/perfectly enough, finished quite haphazardly like i do with all my exams ! bloody take my time to get into the swing then end up finsihing like a mad man !

    did v well on the coursework so not too worried tho cos thats made sure i dont have to set the world alight to get a high mark
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    How many marks do you think I will lose for having bad punctuation in my essays as well as a bit of a chaotic structure?
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    (Original post by GrandMasterChe)
    Franky

    talked about his arrogance - linked it to Walton (double)
    biblical links to satan , like creature (double)


    counter arg
    twisted sexuality, freud, oedipus, repulsed by marriage - "union" - elizabeth suffers as he spurns her because of this - link to how he spurns creature too (double)

    context
    shelley - feminist, death of her children shaping views on birth
    englightenment - science new ideas

    other ao2
    load of quotes, intertexuality - milton

    basically said that hes arrogant yes, but his twisted sexuality is also key to why he artifically procreates

    yeats
    disorder, chaos, biblical imagery, gyre, easter 1916 - transition from not taking natioanlists seriously to all changed utterly, fisherman - the best lack all conviction, worst full of passionate intensity - clever man cries catch cries of the clown, irrationality of the worst - like irish airman's "impulse of delight" - irrationality key to rapid change. leda and the swan - both poems start off heavily stressed and somewhat in media res although that applies more to second coming - in the last second made a brief link to cold heaven - "insidious desert birds" "rook delighting heaven" - darkness.

    think i explored language well with yeats, disorder reflected by trochaic pentameter, biblical imagery, unconventional take on sonnet the octave volta but then fourteen lines rather than setset. the lion's a badass etc

    all in all i had a lot of ideas with the two questions which i was happy with only worried may have not strucutred it fluidly/perfectly enough, finished quite haphazardly like i do with all my exams ! bloody take my time to get into the swing then end up finsihing like a mad man !

    did v well on the coursework so not too worried tho cos thats made sure i dont have to set the world alight to get a high mark
    Just remembered a point about yeats.

    I talked about the "pale (?) sun" reflecting in the eyes of the sphinx figure and how it shows the world is a different, more negative place because a symbol of joy is no colourless.

    Is that point good or bad?
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    (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
    Just remembered a point about yeats.

    I talked about the "pale (?) sun" reflecting in the eyes of the sphinx figure and how it shows the world is a different, more negative place because a symbol of joy is no colourless.

    Is that point good or bad?

    i think with lit you can literally make any point as long as you back it up with ao2
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    (Original post by GrandMasterChe)
    i think with lit you can literally make any point as long as you back it up with ao2
    A02 is quotes, right?
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    (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
    A02 is quotes, right?
    form structure language and verse form

    so if you explored the effect of pale sun sufficiently its all good. basically if you just put it on itself and didnt explore the language, signficiance of pale/sun then you wont get any points for that quote
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    (Original post by GrandMasterChe)
    form structure language and verse form

    so if you explored the effect of pale sun sufficiently its all good. basically if you just put it on itself and didnt explore the language, signficiance of pale/sun then you wont get any points for that quote
    Oh, I said something like "pale" makes the sun sound soulless (or colourless) and the sun is usually a symbol of joy in literature, therefore, Yeats has shown the world has changed and is no longer a happy place because the sun - typically a happy image - is no longer radiant.

    Something like that - so I won't get any marks?
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    (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
    Oh, I said something like "pale" makes the sun sound soulless (or colourless) and the sun is usually a symbol of joy in literature, therefore, Yeats has shown the world has changed and is no longer a happy place because the sun - typically a happy image - is no longer radiant.

    Something like that - so I won't get any marks?

    well you've explored the language so i dont see why not
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    (Original post by GrandMasterChe)
    well you've explored the language so i dont see why not
    Oh that counts as exploring language? I thought language was saying like talking about it being an adjective, etc.
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    (Original post by Phil Dunphy)
    Oh, I said something like "pale" makes the sun sound soulless (or colourless) and the sun is usually a symbol of joy in literature, therefore, Yeats has shown the world has changed and is no longer a happy place because the sun - typically a happy image - is no longer radiant.

    Something like that - so I won't get any marks?
    That's analysis of language so you should get some AO2 marks for that, in response to your earlier question to me the points you made look good

    Thinking about the Frankenstein questions, I don't think they were great as they were kind of really specific, I was expecting for something a little more vague where there would be many ways to answer the question. I kinda think that lead me to lose focus on the question which I'm worried about as I think my ideas really good, it just wasn't a completely proper response to the question How many marks will I lose for this? Will I only lose A01 marks?
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    (Original post by NiallD)
    That's analysis of language so you should get some AO2 marks for that, in response to your earlier question to me the points you made look good

    Thinking about the Frankenstein questions, I don't think they were great as they were kind of really specific, I was expecting for something a little more vague where there would be many ways to answer the question. I kinda think that lead me to lose focus on the question which I'm worried about as I think my ideas really good, it just wasn't a completely proper response to the question How many marks will I lose for this? Will I only lose A01 marks?
    Few! So worried about how this exam went..Hurry up August!!
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    Poetry was great I linked to:
    I Felt a Funeral
    It was not Death

    What did you talk about?

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    I personally think the boundaries will be lower... The two most popular options (Dorian Gray and Frankenstein) were much more difficult than last January and June. Also, Yeats seemed to me to be a little too specific ("a sense of the world changing"), in comparison to "change" in Wild Swans and "memory" in Dreams... there were lots of techniques in the Second Coming, but I don't think that they were relevant to the question... So lower boundaries probably.

    To the person who said you need to look at for and against: wrong. With these questions, you've got to assume an opinion and collate evidence to support this. Okay, it could be seen as an alternative reading (AO3) but high marks in this section come from feminist/Marxist/critics. If anything, treating it like a history essay and looking rigidly at both sides will detract from the overall effectiveness, and perhaps your focus from AO2/3/4.


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    (Original post by ArtisticFlair)
    I personally think the boundaries will be lower... The two most popular options (Dorian Gray and Frankenstein) were much more difficult than last January and June. Also, Yeats seemed to me to be a little too specific ("a sense of the world changing"), in comparison to "change" in Wild Swans and "memory" in Dreams... there were lots of techniques in the Second Coming, but I don't think that they were relevant to the question... So lower boundaries probably.

    To the person who said you need to look at for and against: wrong. With these questions, you've got to assume an opinion and collate evidence to support this. Okay, it could be seen as an alternative reading (AO3) but high marks in this section come from feminist/Marxist/critics. If anything, treating it like a history essay and looking rigidly at both sides will detract from the overall effectiveness, and perhaps your focus from AO2/3/4.


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    I don't agree with you about the grade boundaries for Yeats, but possibly they may be lower for Frankenstein. The difference between "change" and a "changing world" is very much marginal if not negligible. The structure, for example, was perfect for change. Begins in Iambic Pentametre with an attempt at rhyme but quickly descends into free verse, lack of punctuation enjambment. This lack of control becomes the structural manifestation of the "vast image" which refuses to exist within preset boundaries: the monster will destroy order in the new age. Just one example.

    It is also true that both sides of argument don't need explored. The Frankenstein question on doubling simply asked you to present how Shelley used the Double. The statement simply stimulated discussion. It did not ask you did you agree with that said statement.

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