The Top 10 UK Universities Watch

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LutherVan
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#461
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#461
(Original post by Hollywood Hogan)
It just does, Law is the only exception where KCL rules most unis. To get into Bath you need AAA/A*AA realistically.
It just does?

There is one thing to troll, it is something different to do it unintelligently.
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Hollywood Hogan
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#462
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#462
(Original post by LutherVan)
It just does?

There is one thing to troll, it is something different to do it unintelligently.
Bath doesn't accept students in with lower grades. I'm much older than you I am guessing.
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nulli tertius
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#463
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#463
(Original post by Hollywood Hogan)
Bath doesn't accept students in with lower grades. I'm much older than you I am guessing.
CCC and the ability to kick a ball.

http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/ug/prosp...-requirements/
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cambio wechsel
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#464
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#464
(Original post by LutherVan)
Also the average graduate starting salaries of KCL is one of the top 5 amongst the UK's major universities and probably £1,500 more than the average Warwick graduate commands.
this is a bit of a false metric. It would be valid in comparing, e.g. Warwick and York but here it needs adjusting for the proportion of graduates finding employment in London, where the civil service weighting, for example, amounts to several thousands of pounds. For graduate salaries, Kent will outperform some several in the Russell group, not because it's a 'better university' but because its cohort is drawn from, and later seeks work in, London and the South East.
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Hollywood Hogan
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#465
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#465
(Original post by nulli tertius)
CCC and the ability to kick a ball.

http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/ug/prosp...-requirements/
That is a foundation degree, aimed at students with excellent sporting ability.
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nulli tertius
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#466
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#466
(Original post by Hollywood Hogan)
That is a foundation degree, aimed at students with excellent sporting ability.
Which falsifies your statement:-

Bath doesn't accept students in with lower grades.
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Hollywood Hogan
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
Which falsifies your statement:-
You do realise that a foundation degree is a bit like re-taking A levels?
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nulli tertius
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#468
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(Original post by Hollywood Hogan)
You do realise that a foundation degree is a bit like re-taking A levels?
I think you are getting confused with a foundation course.

A foundation degree is a two year stand alone qualification that can be "topped up " to a bachelors' degree by a further year of study.

However the nature of the qualification is irrelevant. These are Bath students and they are admitted with modest A levels.
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Hollywood Hogan
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#469
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
I think you are getting confused with a foundation course.

A foundation degree is a two year stand alone qualification that can be "topped up " to a bachelors' degree by a further year of study.

However the nature of the qualification is irrelevant. These are Bath students and they are admitted with modest A levels.
Nope, a foundation degree is not a HND as you are implying that can be topped up. It is a 2 year course to get students to degree material. Show me where Bath say it can be turned into a degree? The webpage says students who perform well on completion can transfer to the BSc which is a separate 1 year course stand alone.

I was just reading the last few hours about degree level Maths topics, and then to get a message on this topic on grades for a mickey mouse access course is just too low to bother with. It is like you are fishing for something like a dog does when out hunting for something after the owner has abandoned her.

I believe Oxbridge allows students in for graduate diplomas on very low grades, some you don't need any qualifications. This makes your argument sound really thick.
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nulli tertius
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#470
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#470
(Original post by Hollywood Hogan)
Nope, a foundation degree is not a HND as you are implying that can be topped up. It is a 2 year course to get students to degree material. Show me where Bath say it can be turned into a degree?
The foundation degree in Sports Performance is a two-year course taught on campus and gives students the opportunity to progress onto our one-year BSc Honours in Sport.
http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/ug/foundation

A foundation degree isn't an HND. The relationship of them to HNDs is obscure to say the least. The last government created (and gave money to create) FdD without mentioning the existence of the older HND qualification. It was a reinvention of the wheel.
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Hollywood Hogan
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#471
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#471
(Original post by nulli tertius)
http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/ug/foundation

A foundation degree isn't an HND. The relationship of them to HNDs is obscure to say the least. The last government created (and gave money to create) FdD without mentioning the existence of the older HND qualification. It was a reinvention of the wheel.
You get the foundation degree, then a separate qualification of a BSc. They are not merged. The course is aimed at people with strong sporting ability.

Is this the best you can do to discredit Bath, which has always been more exclusive over the last few decades and more respected than KCL?
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nulli tertius
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#472
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(Original post by Hollywood Hogan)
You get the foundation degree, then a separate qualification of a BSc. They are not merged. The course is aimed at people with strong sporting ability.
Or as I put it

A foundation degree is a two year stand alone qualification that can be "topped up " to a bachelors' degree by a further year of study.
"top up" is the conventional language for doing the extra year.

Is this the best you can do to discredit Bath, which has always been more exclusive over the last few decades and more respected than KCL?
Apart from its sports courses Bath generally doesn't drop below ABB except for modern languages. Like most universities it will be plumbing the depths for students of German.
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Hollywood Hogan
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#473
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(Original post by nulli tertius)
Or as I put it



"top up" is the conventional language for doing the extra year.



Apart from its sports courses Bath generally doesn't drop below ABB except for modern languages. Like most universities it will be plumbing the depths for students of German.
Not even the most desperate wally on TSR mentions foundation degrees as part of their argument for grades needed to enter degree programmes. You are not English are you?
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nulli tertius
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#474
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(Original post by Hollywood Hogan)
Not even the most desperate wally on TSR mentions foundation degrees as part of their argument for grades needed to enter degree programmes. You are not English are you?
Half English, half Scots.

Lets just repeat you statement which I picked up upon:-

Bath doesn't accept students in with lower grades.
At the end of three years the Bath student with CCC A levels and a sporting skill walks out of Bath with BSc (Hons).
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LutherVan
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#475
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#475
(Original post by Hollywood Hogan)
Bath doesn't accept students in with lower grades. I'm much older than you I am guessing.
He just made a fool of your older backside.


(Original post by nulli tertius)
CCC and the ability to kick a ball.

http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/ug/prosp...-requirements/
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LutherVan
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#476
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(Original post by cambio wechsel)
this is a bit of a false metric. It would be valid in comparing, e.g. Warwick and York but here it needs adjusting for the proportion of graduates finding employment in London, where the civil service weighting, for example, amounts to several thousands of pounds. For graduate salaries, Kent will outperform some several in the Russell group, not because it's a 'better university' but because its cohort is drawn from, and later seeks work in, London and the South East.
Oh, sorry. My bad!

So you are saying if one goes to Warwick, the place majority of the students get jobs would be places Scunthorpe, Wrexham and Skegness?

So London universities are better then because the top companies (of which majority are based in London) would prefer London students, based on your argument here.
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cambio wechsel
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(Original post by LutherVan)
So London universities are better then because the top companies (of which majority are based in London) would prefer London students, based on your argument here.
my argument had nothing to do with what employers might prefer and had been that all King's students have a revealed want or willingness to live in London; it's where they chose to go to university.

My supposition, then, is that a greater proportion of King's grads seek, and consequently find, work in London than do Warwick grads. If that is right, then it will bear on average starting salaries, whether people are or are not at 'top companies'. If you join the civil service fast-track in Birmingham you will be paid less than would be the case in London, and similarly if you go into schoolteaching.
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nulli tertius
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#478
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#478
(Original post by LutherVan)
Oh, sorry. My bad!

So you are saying if one goes to Warwick, the place majority of the students get jobs would be places Scunthorpe, Wrexham and Skegness?

So London universities are better then because the top companies (of which majority are based in London) would prefer London students, based on your argument here.
There are various points here.

There are regional factors with virtually all universities. More students who go to Warwick will wish to stay and work in and around Brum than students who go to Kent. Not all students are 18-21 year olds with no ties and students acquire ties whilst they are at university.

Moreover, family background has an influence not only on whether strings can be pulled to secure employment but also where geographically those strings can be found.

I should add that it is very hard to recruit into unfashionable towns. My firm is in the position of having to do it for some of our offices. One is often dependent upon catching locals who have gone away to uni and for one reason or another want to go back home.
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LutherVan
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#479
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#479
(Original post by cambio wechsel)
my argument had nothing to do with what employers might prefer and had been that all King's students have a revealed want or willingness to live in London; it's where they chose to go to university.

My supposition, then, is that a greater proportion of King's grads seek, and consequently find, work in London than do Warwick grads. If that is right, then it will bear on average starting salaries, whether people are or are not at 'top companies'. If you join the civil service fast-track in Birmingham you will be paid less than would be the case in London, and similarly if you go into schoolteaching.
Oh, is that true?

So where do Warwick students prefer find work? The Silicon Valleys of Shrewsbury?

Mate, a higher percentage of KCL students get employed than Warwick students and on average get paid more, get over it.
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LutherVan
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#480
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#480
(Original post by nulli tertius)
There are various points here.

There are regional factors with virtually all universities. More students who go to Warwick will wish to stay and work in and around Brum than students who go to Kent. Not all students are 18-21 year olds with no ties and students acquire ties whilst they are at university.

Moreover, family background has an influence not only on whether strings can be pulled to secure employment but also where geographically those strings can be found.

I should add that it is very hard to recruit into unfashionable towns. My firm is in the position of having to do it for some of our offices. One is often dependent upon catching locals who have gone away to uni and for one reason or another want to go back home.
Majority of the graduate level jobs measured by the survey would have been in London.

Many students would have been applying for these jobs from all the universities.

I am sure more students originally from London would be at Warwick than KCL because of the desire to experience something new. They are likely to want to come back home to work after universitty.

Kent is not Warwick. Majority of students from all universities would be hoping to work in London and get the top jobs there. Including those from Warwick and Kent.
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