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    (Original post by madmadmax321)
    True, I just feel like tsr only values money yet goes on and on about how more mathematical the subject is the higher salary you can achieve with it which just isnt the case (otherwise maths and physics grads would earn alot more than engineers that contrary to popular belief dont do too much maths imo)

    I also think tsr, because of the younger age therefore in many cases mindset, think the best careers are the highest paying no matter the job security, hours, amount of moving about etc
    I find people here are generally quite ignorant as to what determines one's eventual post-uni career path (won't be their degree for most people) and they're also not that exposed to how hiring decisions are made. Which all leads to stats like 'x' uni grads make more money, or 'y' uni subject leads to more money or 'z' is more 'favoured' by employers being bandied around because some averaged out survey says so. Kind of a shame tbh because when they get to uni, they'll have to face the reality of how grad job recruitment actually works.

    I do agree that the site also skews towards those who care more about money than the general populous.
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    (Original post by minjinoor)
    talking about economics related careers - is HMRC quite a good destination? i was thinking of IB but for me the lifestyle that comes with it is too demanding so i looked up more 'stable' career paths. im talking specifically about hmrc tax professional graduate scheme. anyone know much about it?
    This would be better posed in the public sector area of the careers sub-forum (or even the sub-forum itself) of this site, not here. Loads of HMRC grad schemers roaming around there.
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    (Original post by Bigpaddy27)
    I see your point though Economics is considered an Art and many universities don't offer courses which are as mathematically rigorous as that of Cam, LSE etc.
    Majority of the econ programmes are BSc, but yes, it is traditionally an Arts subject. That said, it has always been mathematically rigorous.
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    This thread is gold.

    Princepieman, I sense you and STEMisSuperior. will get along amazingly at Warwick
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    (Original post by Metrododo)
    This thread is gold.

    Princepieman, I sense you and STEMisSuperior. will get along amazingly at Warwick
    They will rip each other apart around campus. They will be like Batman vs Joker, Superman vs Lex, STEM vs Humanities. I look forward to their pairing.
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    (Original post by minjinoor)
    talking about economics related careers - is HMRC quite a good destination? i was thinking of IB but for me the lifestyle that comes with it is too demanding so i looked up more 'stable' career paths. im talking specifically about hmrc tax professional graduate scheme. anyone know much about it?
    depends what you're after. the starting salary is fairly on par with tax accounting roles in the private sector (and higher than some), and it sounds like it does stay that way for a few years. if you qualify i gather they aim to put you into a fairly senior management position on around 50k, which is fairly respectable for 4 years into a career. i'm not sure what the career progression is like from there though. the chance of the sort of mega bucks you can get working in finance in the private sector is just not there, but on the other hand it is public sector so those dudes earning mega bucks will probably be doing half as many hours as you again. if you want a work-life balance, its potentially a good option.

    in terms of degree subject i dont think they really care, and you only need a 2.2 to get on. sounds like they're more concerned with employability skills as measured by their psychometric tests and assessment centres. leadership, team work, initiative, organisation etc. etc.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    They will rip each other apart around campus. They will be like Batman vs Joker, Superman vs Lex, STEM vs Humanities. I look forward to their pairing.
    Princepieman is a CompSci - so more STEM that the economist. He just has a more balanced view of real life.
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    (Original post by Implication)
    depends what you're after. the starting salary is fairly on par with tax accounting roles in the private sector (and higher than some), and it sounds like it does stay that way for a few years. if you qualify i gather they aim to put you into a fairly senior management position on around 50k, which is fairly respectable for 4 years into a career. i'm not sure what the career progression is like from there though. the chance of the sort of mega bucks you can get working in finance in the private sector is just not there, but on the other hand it is public sector so those dudes earning mega bucks will probably be doing half as many hours as you again. if you want a work-life balance, its potentially a good option.

    in terms of degree subject i dont think they really care, and you only need a 2.2 to get on. sounds like they're more concerned with employability skills as measured by their psychometric tests and assessment centres. leadership, team work, initiative, organisation etc. etc.
    thanks for that wholesome reply - i really appreciate it
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    This would be better posed in the public sector area of the careers sub-forum (or even the sub-forum itself) of this site, not here. Loads of HMRC grad schemers roaming around there.
    true, will do
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    (Original post by STEMisSuperior.)
    For the reasons i have given for my original post. better career prospects, higher earners, better grades, not being easily replaced etc etc
    You're saying STEM graduates ca't be easily replaced? They'll be the first people to be replaced when artificial intelligence becomes more effective, because most jobs in the STEM industry don't require creativity or for you to hold an opinion; human qualities which currently computers can't imitate.
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    (Original post by STEMisSuperior.)
    This forum has been quick to dismiss people who claim that STEM and non-STEM subjects are on the same level. Well let me break it to people who study non-STEM subjects; STEM is superior in every aspect.
    Here's why:
    - STEM grads earn way more money than non STEM grads(ST and LT)
    - STEM students have better grades than non STEM students (on average)
    - STEM grads have greater career prospects than non STEM grads
    - STEM grads are more intelligent since their degrees need more thinking ability.
    - In the future, STEM grads will be more in demand since computers and AI can easily replace the jobs of a non STEM grad.
    - Careers such as high finance actually have a preference of STEM (and econ/finance) over other non STEM grads. Why? Because STEM grads have a more respectable degree.
    - STEM grads can do the job a non STEM grad does (perhaps with a little bit of training)
    - Many non STEM degrees such as languages can be done by STEM students so long as they choose the appropriate modules at uni.

    Lets be honest, the people who say "STEM and non STEM degrees are equal!" are those who do non STEM degrees or A levels and are very insecure. This has now led to STEM students and non STEM students degrees look equal, which is an insult to STEM students. A maths grad and english grad are not equal, sorry.

    (Economics/Finance are also basically STEM since they have a lot of maths in their degrees)
    You can shove all those reasons up your arse, I, and everyone else, should pursue whatever makes them happy. Want good money and a good reputation? Do the degree you like at the best institutes in your country, otherwise, only pursue what you love.
    And that's coming from a physicist.
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    (Original post by Laura/)
    You're saying STEM graduates ca't be easily replaced? They'll be the first people to be replaced when artificial intelligence becomes more effective, because most jobs in the STEM industry don't require creativity or for you to hold an opinion; human qualities which currently computers can't imitate.
    I'm sure they can make a robot to serve coffee which makes 50% of arts graduates redundant.
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    (Original post by Laura/)
    You're saying STEM graduates ca't be easily replaced? They'll be the first people to be replaced when artificial intelligence becomes more effective, because most jobs in the STEM industry don't require creativity or for you to hold an opinion; human qualities which currently computers can't imitate.
    Yes but will do in the not too distant future
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    (Original post by Maker)
    I'm sure they can make a robot to serve coffee which makes 50% of arts graduates redundant.
    Well thats just bull isn't it


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    (Original post by Maker)
    I'm sure they can make a robot to serve coffee which makes 50% of arts graduates redundant.
    I mean I understand your being sarcastic and everything but your point is just completely invalid


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    (Original post by STEMisSuperior.)
    This forum has been quick to dismiss people who claim that STEM and non-STEM subjects are on the same level. Well let me break it to people who study non-STEM subjects; STEM is superior in every aspect.
    Here's why:
    - STEM grads earn way more money than non STEM grads(ST and LT)
    - STEM students have better grades than non STEM students (on average)
    - STEM grads have greater career prospects than non STEM grads
    - STEM grads are more intelligent since their degrees need more thinking ability.
    - In the future, STEM grads will be more in demand since computers and AI can easily replace the jobs of a non STEM grad.
    - Careers such as high finance actually have a preference of STEM (and econ/finance) over other non STEM grads. Why? Because STEM grads have a more respectable degree.
    - STEM grads can do the job a non STEM grad does (perhaps with a little bit of training)
    - Many non STEM degrees such as languages can be done by STEM students so long as they choose the appropriate modules at uni.

    Lets be honest, the people who say "STEM and non STEM degrees are equal!" are those who do non STEM degrees or A levels and are very insecure. This has now led to STEM students and non STEM students degrees look equal, which is an insult to STEM students. A maths grad and english grad are not equal, sorry.

    (Economics/Finance are also basically STEM since they have a lot of maths in their degrees)
    What about ancient history, which is much harder than chemistry or maths, both in how much you have to learn, and the abilities you have to acquire (brilliant essay writing, the ability to write 15 pages for your exam etc).
    Also only private schools do ancient history, so the grades are ridiculously hard to get.
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    (Original post by balanced)
    What about ancient history, which is much harder than chemistry or maths, both in how much you have to learn, and the abilities you have to acquire (brilliant essay writing, the ability to write 15 pages for your exam etc).
    Also only private schools do ancient history, so the grades are ridiculously hard to get.
    I understand Ancient History is hard but I think Chemistry is one of the hardest if not the hardest subject to take at least at A-Level as is Further Maths (regular Maths is much easier imo)


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    If you have a stem you're a vegetable. (I have nothing useful to contribute and will quietly leave now)
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    (Original post by balanced)
    What about ancient history, which is much harder than chemistry or maths, both in how much you have to learn, and the abilities you have to acquire (brilliant essay writing, the ability to write 15 pages for your exam etc).
    Also only private schools do ancient history, so the grades are ridiculously hard to get.
    Ancient history must be harder because it happened a long time ago and people's memory are not as good when they are older. I find remembering stuff that happened a long time ago hard as well, for example, I can't remember what I had for lunch when I was 8.
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    (Original post by balanced)
    What about ancient history, which is much harder than chemistry or maths, both in how much you have to learn, and the abilities you have to acquire (brilliant essay writing, the ability to write 15 pages for your exam etc).
    Also only private schools do ancient history, so the grades are ridiculously hard to get.
    Is this A-level or GCSE? Or indeed degree level?
 
 
 
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