Oxford PAT 2016

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    Hey guys, for questions like these i left my answer as 1/80m^2
    I know in some AS/Alevel exams they cut marks for standard units or accuracy of sorts. Might be a stupid question, but is it ok to do this?
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    Hey guys, this is a chemistry formula from what i know at least. I dont think this pops up in physics? So are we to expect some chemistry type questions or have i missed something
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    (Original post by NatoHeadshot)
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    Hey guys, this is a chemistry formula from what i know at least. I dont think this pops up in physics? So are we to expect some chemistry type questions or have i missed something
    This is a physics question. You have delta Q=mc delta theta formula in physics, and mass is density times volume.
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Size:  137.7 KBThis is question 21B from the 2013 paper. Can anyone help be understand what exactly is being asked in 21 b just learned circular motion not too long ago so I understand the formula being used but what is exactly the y co ordinate they're asking and why does it get multiplied by two at the end? Are they just talking about centripetal force?
    Thanks in advance
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    (Original post by NatoHeadshot)
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Size:  137.7 KBThis is question 21B from the 2013 paper. Can anyone help be understand what exactly is being asked in 21 b just learned circular motion not too long ago so I understand the formula being used but what is exactly the y co ordinate they're asking and why does it get multiplied by two at the end? Are they just talking about centripetal force?
    Thanks in advance
    y coordinate is the distance below the top of detector where the particle is detected. The charged particle follows semi-circular path before it hits the detector. So the required distance is the diameter of the orbit. The radius in the solution is found using circular motion formula and it is multiplied by 2 in order to get the diameter i.e y-coordinate.

    Hope this helps.
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    Did anyone get the 2012 physics question 22 some of those graph sketches were hard for me as i was doing the entire paper under a time limit :afraid:
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    (Original post by NatoHeadshot)
    Did anyone get the 2012 physics question 22 some of those graph sketches were hard for me as i was doing the entire paper under a time limit :afraid:
    Which part?
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    (Original post by NatoHeadshot)
    Did anyone get the 2012 physics question 22 some of those graph sketches were hard for me as i was doing the entire paper under a time limit :afraid:
    Probably the hardest question in the paper imo.

    You need to be able to link integration and apply it to the context.

    Look at some edexcel M2 (I think it might be called multivariate calculus..idk) and then have another go at the question.
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    (Original post by NatoHeadshot)
    Did anyone get the 2012 physics question 22 some of those graph sketches were hard for me as i was doing the entire paper under a time limit :afraid:
    I don't think anyone got that on the actual paper. It was one of the hardest pat questions if not the hardest
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    (Original post by hellomynameisr)
    Probably the hardest question in the paper imo.

    You need to be able to link integration and apply it to the context.

    Look at some edexcel M2 (I think it might be called multivariate calculus..idk) and then have another go at the question.
    i looked through m2 just now and i cant find find multivariate calculus /:
    i checked edexcel btw
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    (Original post by NatoHeadshot)
    i looked through m2 just now and i cant find find multivariate calculus /:
    i checked edexcel btw
    You don't deed multivariate calculus and there is none in A level syllabus as far as I know. Just save that up for next summer vacation before you go to oxford.

    Edit: I guess you are looking for something like this : https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rc...545,bs.1,d.d24

    or https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rc...545,bs.1,d.d24
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    Hi, so my Maths board is AQA and sciences are OCR A
    Does that mean that for PAT, I'd have to cover the usual C3, C4, M2?
    And are there any specific books geared towards PAT?
    Thanks.
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    (Original post by PhoenixHellRider)
    Hi, so my Maths board is AQA and sciences are OCR A
    Does that mean that for PAT, I'd have to cover the usual C3, C4, M2?
    And are there any specific books geared towards PAT?
    Thanks.
    Hey!
    I think both of those boards are very standard and no doubt Oxford would be aware of the syllabus on major exam boards like these. I don't think M2 is needed since the OCR physics A "Newtonian World" part covers all the mechanics you need for the Pat.

    I don't think there are specific books written for pat though some books are fantastic for learning the pat syllabus, I think some people above have mentioned some.

    Hope this helps!!
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    (Original post by Ipsooo)
    Hey!
    I think both of those boards are very standard and no doubt Oxford would be aware of the syllabus on major exam boards like these. I don't think M2 is needed since the OCR physics A "Newtonian World" part covers all the mechanics you need for the Pat.

    I don't think there are specific books written for pat though some books are fantastic for learning the pat syllabus, I think some people above have mentioned some.

    Hope this helps!!
    Thanks for the help mate
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    How is everyone's prep going?
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    Has everyone picked their 5 unis?
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    I want to apply to oxford for engineering science and was wondering how important the PAT is for this. I know it is very important for physics as you have to achieve a certain mark to get an interview. Would the engineering department use the PAT to a lesser or greater extent than the physics department when deciding who to invite for interview?
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    (Original post by Orlandothefraser)
    I want to apply to oxford for engineering science and was wondering how important the PAT is for this. I know it is very important for physics as you have to achieve a certain mark to get an interview. Would the engineering department use the PAT to a lesser or greater extent than the physics department when deciding who to invite for interview?
    Same extent. The cut-off point for interview is the same, I believe.
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    Hi guys, I'm doing BPHO question as practice for the PAT. I'm stuck on this question. It's question 1 that i'm unsure of
    http://www.physics.ox.ac.uk/olympiad...AS_2008_QP.pdf

    I'd really appreciate some help. Thanks
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    (Original post by student1856)
    Hi guys, I'm doing BPHO question as practice for the PAT. I'm stuck on this question. It's question 1 that i'm unsure of
    http://www.physics.ox.ac.uk/olympiad...AS_2008_QP.pdf

    I'd really appreciate some help. Thanks
    Let the initial intensity be I. when the diameter of the hole is halved, the area of the hole is A/4. Now the intensity at the hole is not changed when the diameter is halved. So,P/A=P'/(A/4) and P'=P/4. Since the width of pattern produced on the screen is doubled, then the area of this pattern is increased by a factor of 4. So compared to previously we could argue that the point at the center has had its power divided by 4. ( since the amount of light it previously had has been spread out to an area 4 times larger than before ) so the power at the centre is P/4 * 1/4= P/16. the intensity decrease by a factor of 16.
 
 
 
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