Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Hey, I had PHIL3 re-marked and it went up 17 UMS points (two grades). From a C to an A. Over the moon!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by will2348)
    Hey, I had PHIL3 re-marked and it went up 17 UMS points (two grades). From a C to an A. Over the moon!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Omg congrats, that's ridiculous how wrong they can be!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by will2348)
    Hey, I had PHIL3 re-marked and it went up 17 UMS points (two grades). From a C to an A. Over the moon!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    That's fantastic! I sent off for my remark on the day of exams, so hoping it gets back soon. When did your remark come in?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zeroandfalling)
    That's fantastic! I sent off for my remark on the day of exams, so hoping it gets back soon. When did your remark come in?
    I sent mine off on Friday, came back Wednesday lunch time . Good luck!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    If anyone got a disappointing result, I would really consider going in for a remark. In January I got 72/100 for Phil 1 but after sending it off for a remark, it went up to 96- that's an increase of 24 UMS points! Good luck everyone!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    The way I understand it is this: the naturalistic fallacy is the attempt to derive a value from a natural fact. So when we look at yellow, we see an example of yellow, or a fact. The mistake, Moore says, is to think that what we see is the abstract idea of yellow (aka: the value), when we really see only an example. He says that it's the same with good: we may see examples of good in the world in certain natural facts - happiness, for example - but to then infer from this that happiness and good are one and the same is a fallacy - the naturalistic fallacy.
    The is/ought gap is an extension. It says that we cannot derive moral imperatives from the world, because natural facts have a truth value, whereas imperatives do not. So for instance, 'happiness is (an example of) good' is a statement that can either be true or false (unless you're a logical positivist ), whereas 'maximise happiness' cannot, by its very nature, be either true or false. Thus the first cannot be translated into the second without a loss of meaning. This is the same principle as deriving a value from a fact, and so comes under the umberella of 'naturalistic fallacy'. I think.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey guys

    I was just wondering if anyone had some good notes on Plato in Unit 4

    My notes from my last year's lessons are not very good and I have self studied the majority of it for my retakes this year :O

    Any help note wise and from experience about the exam would be amazing!! <3

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KEB99)
    Hey guys

    I was just wondering if anyone had some good notes on Plato in Unit 4

    My notes from my last year's lessons are not very good and I have self studied the majority of it for my retakes this year :O

    Any help note wise and from experience about the exam would be amazing!! <3

    Good luck! I self taught myself the whole thing too. I got an A in this exam and uploaded some of my summaries onto getrevising.

    I just summarised the key analogies you will NEED to know, and pretty much bring into every answer.

    You can see them here: http://getrevising.co.uk/members/hannah3559/resources

    Hope that helps!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hi! Do you have any notes for your PHIL3 exam and PHIL4?

    Thanks
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.