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    (Original post by 'THE MASTER')
    So then who's the smartest here?
    In what?:mmm:
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    Any predictions for the six marker?
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    I attached some practice six markers back here if anyone's interested
    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    I've attached some six markers.

    The P5 one looks to be the most difficult out of the three!

    P4- Attachment 227626
    P5- Attachment 227627
    P6- Attachment 227629


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    (Original post by Knowing)
    Because he got it wrong (no offence )

    1/3 + 1/4 + 1/5 = 0.783... (he put 1/0.783, which is wrong)
    And then you find the inverse of 0.738, giving you 1/0.783 = 1.28

    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    Because we have 1/total resistance when we add up the other fractions so we have to find the inverse by raising it to the power of -1 , to get total resistance/1 which is the value we want...It's the same as finding the reciprocal :cool:
    oh yeah..i remember know .....

    i did the Physics spec paper
    Spoiler:
    Show
    72/85 with very cruel marking ...and 5 marks loss in Section D ...
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    Does a motor create AC or DC?
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    (Original post by 'THE MASTER')
    So then who's the smartest here?
    In what ... L'evil Fishzzzz words...

    Ryan
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    (Original post by andersson)
    Does a motor create AC or DC?
    A motor uses DC- this is why it needs a commutator to switch the direction of the current every half turn and allow it to continue spinning :cool:
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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    I attached some practice six markers back here if anyone's interested
    Answers?
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    (Original post by andersson)
    Does a motor create AC or DC?
    A motor creates kinetic energy
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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    A motor uses DC- this is why it needs a commutator to switch the direction of the current every half turn and allow it to continue spinning :cool:
    Yeah thanks I got it now, CGP only says that in an indirect way :lol:
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    (Original post by Knowing)
    A motor creates kinetic energy
    Shh ant
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    In optics, why are real images inverted?
    How do Diode depletion layers work?
    What is meant by a 'smooth' voltage output?
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    (Original post by Knowing)
    A motor creates kinetic energy
    Energy can't be created or destroyed


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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    Energy can't be created or destroyed


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    Dang it! You know what I mean :lol: transfers electrical energy into kinetic
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    (Original post by L'Evil Fish)
    Answers?
    Answers attached
    -P4-
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1371499487.634212.jpg
Views: 169
Size:  168.9 KB
    -P5-
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1371499501.194392.jpg
Views: 154
Size:  130.3 KBName:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1371499514.060868.jpg
Views: 147
Size:  155.3 KB
    -P6-
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1371499559.537592.jpg
Views: 149
Size:  156.4 KB


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    Ok so o need to go ober diodes and rectification....although I dnt think it will cone up ... Maybe a 2/3 mark question



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    (Original post by ryanb97)
    Ok so o need to go ober diodes and rectification....although I dntthibk ot will cone up ... Maybe a 2/3 mark question



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    I don't even understand it. Also, are you drunk?:lol:
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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    Answers attached
    -P4-
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1371499487.634212.jpg
Views: 169
Size:  168.9 KB
    -P5-
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1371499501.194392.jpg
Views: 154
Size:  130.3 KBName:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1371499514.060868.jpg
Views: 147
Size:  155.3 KB
    -P6-
    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1371499559.537592.jpg
Views: 149
Size:  156.4 KB


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    The answers to P5 don't correspond to the question
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    (Original post by Knowing)
    The answers to P5 don't correspond to the question
    They do
    -Polarisation can only happen when light acts as a wave
    -When you have two slits, then this evidences that light acts as a wave (an interference pattern can only caused by a wave)
    -Therefore, you can only find the path difference using the wavelength when light acts as a wave (you find the path difference to see if there is constructive and destructive interference).
    -When light acts as a wave, then it slows down in a prism. If it acted like a particle, this effect wouldn't happen.

    Hopefully, they won't ask a question like that in the exam
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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    They do
    -Polarisation can only happen when light acts as a wave
    -When you have two slits, then this evidences that light acts as a wave (an interference pattern can only caused by a wave)
    -Therefore, you can only find the path difference using the wavelength when light acts as a wave (you find the path difference to see if there is constructive and destructive interference).
    -When light acts as a wave, then it slows down in a prism. If it acted like a particle, this effect wouldn't happen.

    Hopefully, they won't ask a question like that in the exam
    That's ridiculous, I sure hope they don't ask that :mad:
 
 
 
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