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    (Original post by chloelong)
    Simple plurality system meaning its simply the candidate with the MOST votes, not the MAJORITY of all votes
    But it still comes under a majoritarian system for some reason along with sv am I right at least that's what I read in the book


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    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    But it still comes under a majoritarian system for some reason along with sv am I right at least that's what I read in the book


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    Its a simple plurality system which produces a majoritarian outcome yes but it UNFAIRLY produces a majoritarian outcome due to Winner's Bonus etc. - a candidate doesn't need to get over 50% of votes, the same with SV. -
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    (Original post by chloelong)
    Its a simple plurality system which produces a majoritarian outcome yes but it UNFAIRLY produces a majoritarian outcome due to Winner's Bonus etc. - a candidate doesn't need to get over 50% of votes, the same with SV. -
    Ahhh I see, well calling it a majoritarian system when it isn't really is misleading then 😕 thank you for explaining it to me ☺️


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    (Original post by mollyadtr)
    Ahhh I see, well calling it a majoritarian system when it isn't really is misleading then 😕 thank you for explaining it to me ☺️


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    No problem! I'd also note make sure not to call any of the systems which produce proportional representation 'proportional representation' as it is an outcome rather than a system
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    How can Cameron have won 37% of the vote in 2015 but got 51% of the seats?
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    (Original post by fingernagel)
    Thank you! Greenpeace is always an interesting one to talk about.
    Any ideas for smaller outsider groups? I was thinking the Gurkha justice campaign but idk if that counts as small, or fathers for justice but I don't know if they count as successful aha
    Well I know that one year the Fathers4Justice campaign dressed up in superhero outfits and stood in areas to gain publicity for their cause. You will have to look up the year!
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    (Original post by Louise12307)
    Well I know that one year the Fathers4Justice campaign dressed up in superhero outfits and stood in areas to gain publicity for their cause. You will have to look up the year!
    2004! One of the campaigners dressed up as Batman and climbed Buckingham Palace
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    (Original post by romaiseb)
    Any examples of tyranny of the minority? (Pressure groups)
    You could talk about practically any core insider. You could argue that they have a louder voice than those outside as they work closely and regularly alongside government (e.g. RSPB). Or you could talk about how because there's no internal democracy, a pressure group can do a petition or something and get results that don't represent the views of everyone in the pressure group.
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    (Original post by Pato1)
    They might ask to what extent has Labour since 2010, moved away from 'New Labour'
    If that comes up I'm leaving the country.
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    (Original post by backup1)
    How can Cameron have won 37% of the vote in 2015 but got 51% of the seats?
    Because FPTP is so distorted. You only need a concentration of the vote in constituencies to win. Conservatives did that well. In 2005 I think it was, Blair had 35% of the popular vote but a 66 seat majority
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    (Original post by xxvine)
    Can somebody give me a
    5 marker def of democracy please
    Democracy is a system of government where the people either influence or make decisions themselves. An example in the UK is through the use of referendums, such as the one for Scottish Independence in 2014. This allowed direct input from the people.

    Secondly, democracy means a government which is regularly held accountable to the people. In the UK, this can be done in a number of ways such as the use of elections every 5 years (due to the Fixed Term Parliaments Act). The people can vote out a government who they see as unsatisfactory.

    Lastly, democracy means that government should exist in order to serve the best interests of the people. This can be done in a variety of ways depending on one's views; these include Burkean, delegate or party delegate representation. Whatever the view, representatives are to generally keep the national interest as a top priority when making decisions.
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    (Original post by Louise12307)
    Democracy is a system of government where the people either influence or make decisions themselves. An example in the UK is through the use of referendums, such as the one for Scottish Independence in 2014. This allowed direct input from the people.

    Secondly, democracy means a government which is regularly held accountable to the people. In the UK, this can be done in a number of ways such as the use of elections every 5 years (due to the Fixed Term Parliaments Act). The people can vote out a government who they see as unsatisfactory.

    Lastly, democracy means that government should exist in order to serve the best interests of the people. This can be done in a variety of ways depending on one's views; these include Burkean, delegate or party delegate representation. Whatever the view, representatives are to generally keep the national interest as a top priority when making decisions.
    All of that in 5 minutes? yikes I feel inadequate
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    If we were writing about effects of the different systems in the UK would we have to describe each system briefly before we asses their effects? Or would we probably not get marks for it?
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    (Original post by alevelpain)
    Hard question:
    Not because votes aren't equal (safe/marginal seats) -> but provides strong stable government
    Not because unelected second chamber -> but representative of the people, amend legislation effectively, it works
    Not because uncodified constitution -> we haven't had a crisis yet, flexible so can adapt to circumstances, we have HR which protects liberties
    Not because our representatives aren't in interests of people? whipped, party loyalty etc -> however increased rebelling, like Syria 2013

    This is just off the top of my head no idea
    I like this question!

    I would start my paragraphs with my Point (a feature of liberal democracy) then I would argue how the uk adheres to it or not with examples and link back to the question .... And repeat.

    E.g. One feature of a liberal democracy involves the protection of human rights/civil liberties. On the one hand, it can be argued that the U.K. conforms to this principle. In 1998, the UK passed the Human Rights Act which incorporated the ECHR into British law. In this way, some may argue that rights of people are protected. However, some may disagree as these rights are not entrenched. The Liberal Democrats argue this and support a codified constitution which will safely secure human rights/civil liberties. Additionally, the current Conservative government wish to bring in a 'British Bill of Rights' in order to remove influence from outside the UK. So, it can be argued that the UK conforms to this principle of liberal democracy due to the HRA of 1998. But others argue that the lack of entrenchment damages the effectiveness of this claim.
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    (Original post by backup1)
    If we were writing about effects of the different systems in the UK would we have to describe each system briefly before we asses their effects? Or would we probably not get marks for it?
    Honestly I'd do it really quickly, like FPTP is a majoritarian system where each voter has one vote for a candidate. Then go on to analyse it
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    Ahaha so instead of actually revising I've been procrastinating by predicting what may come up. Say if any of you agree with them.(I'm not revising elections so haven't included that). These are my predictions for the 25 markers

    Pressure Groups
    - Their importance/how powerful they are
    - Pressure groups and political participation

    Democracy
    - Direct democracy (with the focus on referendums)
    - Political Participation

    Political Parties
    - Labour Party and tradition
    - Conservative Party and tradition (One Nation/Thactherism)
    - Coalition government and how faithful the parties remained to their ideologies
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    (Original post by backup1)
    How can Cameron have won 37% of the vote in 2015 but got 51% of the seats?
    Our system is pretty suckish in that respect. You need a simple plurality of the vote, not a standard majority. It's not how many people vote for someone as a whole nation really, it's how many vote for the MP of the constituency and so a constituency could have buckets of supporters for say, the Green Party but because their support is not widely dispersed along a number of constituencies, they will only gain that one seat. Whereas the conservatives have more dispersed support and so gain more constituencies voting for them and thus more seats. More seats -> majority of the seats (326 or more) = WIN. So not that many people in the UK may have voted for Cameron in 2015 but because his support is dispersed and he he won lots of individual constituencies.... That's how he won.
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    (Original post by Louise12307)
    Well I know that one year the Fathers4Justice campaign dressed up in superhero outfits and stood in areas to gain publicity for their cause. You will have to look up the year!
    This is a great example but i read in the examiner's report that this isn't up to date enough - you'll get marked much better if you have really recent examples.
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    (Original post by alevelpain)
    Honestly I'd do it really quickly, like FPTP is a majoritarian system where each voter has one vote for a candidate. Then go on to analyse it
    just quickly, make sure to remember FPTP is a simple plurality system which PRODUCES a majoritarian outcome unfairly
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    (Original post by alevelpain)
    All of that in 5 minutes? yikes I feel inadequate
    I didn't look at how long it took me to type it, but it didn't feel like long. Also, remember that this typed out probably looks longer on screen than written out on paper. The points I made are pretty basic. That said, I just went by Abraham Lincoln's definition of democracy which is in the book. "To the people, for the people and by the people".
 
 
 
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