Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    Eurgh I hate how you have to constantly revise Kanji and they can't just stick there once you know them :dry:
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    I know cat and I looked at it only a few times some months ago, but that's just one..We'll see how many I learn. Aim = 200. Realistically, more like 20.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    I'll have to learn like 200 for GCSE anyway :dry:

    I know most of them already though :ninja: Geek.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Oh ha I thought you were year 11 then for a fleeting second. Got a bit confused. I would say good luck. But I won't.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    Oh sorry :talkhand: To think I said good luck to you.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    You did? What for? Oh katakana.

    No need to wish you luck if you already know the kanji to be fair.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    Heh . I only recognise them, I can't really write any of them out from memory because I haven't revised enough. Guess this's what it'll be like next year.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    Ha. Well I'm sure you'll go over it in the summer when your exams are over. I'm better at writing them than recognising I think - only slightly though.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I love Japan and really want to learn the language.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by -Matt)
    I love Japan and really want to learn the language.
    So do it ^^ no one can stop you! If you read back a few pages, there's plenty of advice about how to go about that and which books are good :yep: In my experience, it's nowhere near as hard as people think it is, it's just different in almost every possible way. Enjoy and がんばって!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Natsuko)
    So do it ^^ no one can stop you! If you read back a few pages, there's plenty of advice about how to go about that and which books are good :yep: In my experience, it's nowhere near as hard as people think it is, it's just different in almost every possible way. Enjoy and がんばって!
    Yeah it is hard... Actually this is part of the essay I'm working on at the minute;

    イギリスでは少年犯罪の問題に対して、イギリスの政府はその問題を戦 うために、色々な政策を作ることになった。例えば、若者は犯罪を犯し たら、道をはいたり、公園で犬の糞を掃除したりしながら、ピンクなビ ッブを着させる。
    Not to scare you matt or anything...lolz.

    Its really hard to suggest things for people who aren't doing this as an academic discipline. We are obviously trying to understand Japanese at an advanced level rather than building it up slowly.

    I think the Lammers book is good for beginners and learning basic Japanese. The Japanese for Busy People books are okay but are for learning what I call Business Japanese. Which is pointless if you are doing Japanese as something more tangible to your needs. I think out of all the textbooks, the Genkis ones or the Minna no Nihongo are probably the best.

    Weird thing about the Minna no nihongo books was that I couldn't understand one of them because it was all written in kana!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gaijin)
    Yeah it is hard...
    Well I suppose I'm not studying it with my nose to the grind stone like you are so perhaps I have a different point of view. The grammar is VERY difficult (it's taken many explanations from many different sources for me to understand tiny bits eg some of the uses of は and so on ) but I'm sure that'll fall into place for me one day with plenty of practice! ^^ The writing system I think is what scares people the most and personally, I don't find it too bad. It's just a lot to learn! :yep: But the language as a whole does seem more logical to me in places.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Natsuko)
    But the language as a whole does seem more logical to me in places.
    I think so... I think its easy to explain the logic sometimes but kinda confusing when you are dealing with stuff like keigo. I mean even if you write to your g/f or best mate in Japanese you still use polite speech for certain constructions and to bring across certain nuances that can't be explained in English.
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    Oh I had an interview for Japanese in Cambridge today that went pretty badly.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gaijin)
    I think so... I think its easy to explain the logic sometimes but kinda confusing when you are dealing with stuff like keigo. I mean even if you write to your g/f or best mate in Japanese you still use polite speech for certain constructions and to bring across certain nuances that can't be explained in English.
    Sounds fascinating - much more interesting than French! :yep: I think that's where understanding the culture comes into play. When you go for your year out (or have you already been?) hearing all the nuances etc used in a context will probably explain it all and we'll all wonder what was so difficult that's the case in my experience with european languages, anyway.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kimoso)
    Oh I had an interview for Japanese in Cambridge today that went pretty badly.
    Oh no! Aww well maybe it wasn't as bad as you think. I've heard loads of stories of people comming out of Oxbridge interviews thinking it went terribly but still got offers. But bare in mind, that will have been conducted like a supervision so if you didn't like that, their teaching style may not suit you. But remember: they do turn away perfectly good applicants simply because they can't accomodate them. Don't be too disheartened! :hugs:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    みんなさん、今日は!

    Trust me guys, I know how difficult Japanese is - I took the GCSE, and I'm on the A2 course for it now - the trouble is with the A level that it's aimed at Japanese people who live in England, and the exams are 3 hours long! Plus you need to know the culture and whatever.

    However, if you're into it, go for it. I'm the only person in my 6th form doing it, and I still love it.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Natsuko)
    Sounds fascinating - much more interesting than French! :yep: I think that's where understanding the culture comes into play. When you go for your year out (or have you already been?) hearing all the nuances etc used in a context will probably explain it all and we'll all wonder what was so difficult that's the case in my experience with european languages, anyway.
    You don't really need to experience the context per se, you just need a Japanese person to explain the context to you...

    大変はら下手だったから、コンビ二で買ったりんごを食べ るしかない。 O
    大変はら下手だったから、コンビ二で買ったりんごを食べざるを得ない 。 X

    I think both you would translate as;

    Because I was really hungry I had no option but to eat the apple I bought at the convenience store.


    However clearly there are two ways of saying it in Japanese. The first is probably correct and the second one really doesn't work unless its socially mandated that when people are really hungry they must eat apples bought at convenience stores...

    As for Keigo. Most Japanese people couldn't really explain it to you, and in fact most Japanese struggle to use the way they should. As a non native you can just about get away with it.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Tara-M)
    みんなさん、今日は!

    Trust me guys, I know how difficult Japanese is - I took the GCSE, and I'm on the A2 course for it now - the trouble is with the A level that it's aimed at Japanese people who live in England, and the exams are 3 hours long! Plus you need to know the culture and whatever.

    However, if you're into it, go for it. I'm the only person in my 6th form doing it, and I still love it.
    If you are doing it on your own without the help of a native speaker its going to be tough.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gaijin)
    You don't really need to experience the context per se, you just need a Japanese person to explain the context to you...

    大変はら下手だったから、コンビ二で買ったりんごを食べ るしかない。 O
    大変はら下手だったから、コンビ二で買ったりんごを食べざるを得ない 。 X

    I think both you would translate as;

    Because I was really hungry I had no option but to eat the apple I bought at the convenience store.


    However clearly there are two ways of saying it in Japanese. The first is probably correct and the second one really doesn't work unless its socially mandated that when people are really hungry they must eat apples bought at convenience stores...

    As for Keigo. Most Japanese people couldn't really explain it to you, and in fact most Japanese struggle to use the way they should. As a non native you can just about get away with it.
    This doesn't supprise me and in fact makes me feel better

    Alot of your example was far beyond me (I managed to figure out some words with the help of your translation but I don't get the grammar) but I think I get what your saying - it needs explaining first before you can use it yourself or can understand it when you come accross it (obviously). But as part of the explanation there are examples which are necessary to understanding the grammar point and so hearing/seeing it used in context is useful. Perhaps different prople find different things helpful when it comes to grammar :yep:
 
 
 
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?
Useful resources
US study forum

Accommodation profiles:

iQ Student Accommodation

iQ Student Accommodation

Great value student rooms in city centre locations all across the UK


X1 Lettings

X1 Lettings

Luxury student accommodation in Liverpool & Manchester.


Collegiate Accommodation

Collegiate Accommodation

"This is student living. Just better."


Scape Student Living

Study Inn

Providing stunning high quality, boutique student accommodation throughout the UK


The Student Housing Company

The Student Housing Company

Award-winning student accommodation - voted by 22,000 students.

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.