Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by windnamer27)
    Have they given you more info on the career progression? There isn't much on their websites.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I spoke to a recruitment officer for medics in the Navy. She said you do your training in military hospitals post graduation and, for the Navy anyway, you do a six month placement on a boat.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DelphiDeWitt)
    I spoke to a recruitment officer for medics in the Navy. She said you do your training in military hospitals post graduation and, for the Navy anyway, you do a six month placement on a boat.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Does that mean you'll be gmc certified after that and hence be able to work in any UK hospital after the 3 years?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DelphiDeWitt)
    I spoke to a recruitment officer for medics in the Navy. She said you do your training in military hospitals post graduation and, for the Navy anyway, you do a six month placement on a boat.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Is it not 2-3 years of general duties post foundation years before specialty training for the Navy?

    (Original post by blackraven)
    Does that mean you'll be gmc certified after that and hence be able to work in any UK hospital after the 3 years?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Service Medical Officers still do FY1 and FY2 the same as any doctor, so you'll get full registration after your F1 year.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by wl1)
    Is it not 2-3 years of general duties post foundation years before specialty training for the Navy?



    Service Medical Officers still do FY1 and FY2 the same as any doctor, so you'll get full registration after your F1 year.
    Yeah the navy the RAF and the army all have general duties years. Those years will put you behind your counterparts in the NHS. I think the army is 2 years? I'd like to do it but not sure I want it to be my entire career. Anyone fancy a whatsapp group to discuss?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by windnamer27)
    Yeah the navy the RAF and the army all have general duties years. Those years will put you behind your counterparts in the NHS. I think the army is 2 years? I'd like to do it but not sure I want it to be my entire career. Anyone fancy a whatsapp group to discuss?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    A whatsapp group is a great idea.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by wl1)
    Is it not 2-3 years of general duties post foundation years before specialty training for the Navy?
    Yes, I believe so. Bearing in mind you'll be with the forces 6 years post graduation.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Yes that's a good idea.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by HCAssistant93)
    I've heard the QR in the mocks is a little harder. mock A QR was terrifically hard in my opinion.

    It's not a terrible score! Have you looked at Bristol. They don't look at any exams and focus on other things. you need AAB in a level with A in chemistry though.

    Are you taking the gamsat?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Just wanted to say a massive thank you for bringing Bristol to my attention otherwise I might have never applied there! After 3 rejections pre-interview, I finally got an offer for GEM at Bristol, so thank you sooooo much once again
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey guys,

    Just wondering if anyone could advise me. I don't have A-level/ Higher chemistry or biology for matter. I've had some offers and I'm wanting to catch up/ bring myself to a suitable level of knowledge in these areas before starting.

    Could anyone advise areas and concepts of chemistry that would be beneficial to familiarise myself with before starting?
    I understand this is a very broad question, nevertheless any information would be handy.

    cheers peeps.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JDarlo91)
    Hey guys,

    Just wondering if anyone could advise me. I don't have A-level/ Higher chemistry or biology for matter. I've had some offers and I'm wanting to catch up/ bring myself to a suitable level of knowledge in these areas before starting.

    Could anyone advise areas and concepts of chemistry that would be beneficial to familiarise myself with before starting?
    I understand this is a very broad question, nevertheless any information would be handy.

    cheers peeps.
    Which uni/course are you doing? I would say it's probably different for every course as to what is useful to look at beforehand? Maybe try and ask a current 1st year where you're going?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JDarlo91)
    I don't have A-level/ Higher chemistry or biology for matter. I've had some offers
    [Which begs the question how have you got an offer for Medicine with no science background]

    However, this is a sensible book to start with is http://www.amazon.co.uk/Clinical-Che.../dp/0723431590 or http://www.amazon.co.uk/Clinical-Bio...326634&sr=1-1- and you may be able to get them through inter-library loan or second hand on ebay rather than paying full-price on Amazon.
    Offline

    7
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    Which begs the question how have you got an offer for Medicine with no science background
    Lots of GEM courses don't require science qualifications.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    No science "background" either. Self taught for GAMSAT.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JDarlo91)
    Hey guys,

    Just wondering if anyone could advise me. I don't have A-level/ Higher chemistry or biology for matter. I've had some offers and I'm wanting to catch up/ bring myself to a suitable level of knowledge in these areas before starting.

    Could anyone advise areas and concepts of chemistry that would be beneficial to familiarise myself with before starting?
    I understand this is a very broad question, nevertheless any information would be handy.

    cheers peeps.
    Startig medical school? Don't do anything! honestly don't bother. I didn't have any chemistry past a C at GCSE and I've done fine, there is barely any chemistry in the degree nothing that you need to worry about... My knowledge barely goes past what a mole is.
    Just enjoy your time off before you start!
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JDarlo91)
    Hey guys,

    Just wondering if anyone could advise me. I don't have A-level/ Higher chemistry or biology for matter. I've had some offers and I'm wanting to catch up/ bring myself to a suitable level of knowledge in these areas before starting.

    Could anyone advise areas and concepts of chemistry that would be beneficial to familiarise myself with before starting?
    I understand this is a very broad question, nevertheless any information would be handy.

    cheers peeps.
    Some friends of mine who did undergrad medicine at UCL used to moan about organic chemistry. There are lots of good educational videos on YouTube eg Crash Course and The Chemistry Tutor.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi, I am just wondering if I can get advice from anyone currently applying! I am in my second yr of BSc Animal Behaviour, but I want to be a clinical researcher in immunology! All my modules this and next year are Disease based and my dissertation is going to be working on immunology! I have plenty of experience being a support worker and carer, and I am about to start work as a HCA! I have loads of voluntary experience working with people with learning difficulties, mental health and disadvantaged backgrounds, I have worked in Conservation, Teaching and all sorts (basically the only thing I pretty much haven't done, is tended a bar!) Although, my grades are pretty shite, I think I will end my degree with a 2:2 (a 2:1 at an absolute push!) due to issue i am facing throughout my degree / life. I am wondering what your application processes are, what your funding entitlement is and how you got round to figuring to apply as a GEM. I don't know if I have the right experience or knowledge to be a doctor (want to get to Consultant level!) as I'm also severely dyslexic and dyspraxic, which wasn't found until I was 19, so I have no idea how bad I will struggle or what help is available if I am not entitled to student finance! Currently I am contemplating doing a MSc in Biomedical Science before heading into Medicine.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Interesting article, relevant to GEM at the end.
    https://www.politicshome.com/health-...l-registration
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Minion#1)
    Hi...
    A 2:2 could really limit you in terms of where you could apply. The Masters would reopen a few doors of you did well in that.

    Funding for A101: self fund 3.5k, get 5.5k in loans for years 1-4 and an NHS fee contribution of 3.5k in years 2-4. Maintenance loan varies on personal circumstances but it's up to about 8k.

    Funding for A100: self fund 36k and NHS will pay the fees for year 5. You can get the same maintenance loan as with A101.

    The dyslexia/dyspraxia support would be the same as at your undergrad. Extra time, disability funding etc.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Quilverine)
    A 2:2 could really limit you in terms of where you could apply. The Masters would reopen a few doors of you did well in that.

    Funding for A101: self fund 3.5k, get 5.5k in loans for years 1-4 and an NHS fee contribution of 3.5k in years 2-4. Maintenance loan varies on personal circumstances but it's up to about 8k.

    Funding for A100: self fund 36k and NHS will pay the fees for year 5. You can get the same maintenance loan as with A101.

    The dyslexia/dyspraxia support would be the same as at your undergrad. Extra time, disability funding etc.
    okay, thanks for that! I've just seen however, another thread that paying the first 3.5K is *******s? Is that actually true or untrue? Otherwise I have a lot of saving to do!!

    Is there any specific masters that is prefered? I am thinking of doing Biomed, Public Health or Immunity.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Minion#1)
    okay, thanks for that! I've just seen however, another thread that paying the first 3.5K is *******s? Is that actually true or untrue? Otherwise I have a lot of saving to do!!

    Is there any specific masters that is prefered? I am thinking of doing Biomed, Public Health or Immunity.
    The way funding currently stands is, yes you pay £3465 in the first year and get loans for the rest of the 9k. In years 2-4 the NHS pays that.
    This is of course, for the 4 year courses only.

    Just be wary with Masters. You need to make sure they finish in time, as many GEM courses start early (early Sept) and thus the official end date of your Masters must fall before this.

    And no subject is preferred. Pick what you'd want to do.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.