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Edexcel FP3 - 27th June, 2016 watch

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    (Original post by Cookie2314)
    Attachment 556373 Can someone help with part c what do I do? I thought i would sub in teetha equals 0 and get the equation of the tangent as x=a now what?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Sub in X=a into your tangent equation for the first line. You're told that the second tangent is a tangent to the point (a,0) which means it must be a straight line perpendicular to the X axis.
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    Is anyone doing FP3 in the morning? We're doing S2 first in my college 😪
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    Attachment 556455556457Name:  Capture3.PNG
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    Can someone explain how they find the point on the line please? (The bit where they say x=0: (0,5/2,15,2) etc)
    Help would be much appreciated

    Zacken
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    (Original post by AmarPatel98)
    Attachment 556455556457Name:  Capture3.PNG
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    Can someone explain how they find the point on the line please? (The bit where they say x=0: (0,5/2,15,2) etc)
    Help would be much appreciated

    Zacken
    Does this help at all?

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    hey guys, what's a good resource to learn/practice reduction formulae? looking at the spec they give examples like I=sin(nx)/sinx, are there a textbooks/video tutorials that go over more complicated reduction formulae?
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    (Original post by AmarPatel98)
    Attachment 556455556457Name:  Capture3.PNG
Views: 148
Size:  55.9 KB

    Can someone explain how they find the point on the line please? (The bit where they say x=0: (0,5/2,15,2) etc)
    Help would be much appreciated

    Zacken
    Oh i was having trouble with that at first but i'll try to break it down to you.
    there's one plane with equation r.(3,-4,2)=5 and r.(1,3,-1)=0 ---- this one is from taking out 3 from (3,9,-3) and using the dot product on (0,0,0)
    after having the two equations, r.(3,-4,2)=5 and r(1,3,-1)=0 you do simultaneous equations from letting x=0, which would be -4x+2y=5, 3x-y=0 --- when solving these you get (0,5/2,15/2) -- this is your position vector.
    the direction would be the cross multiplication of (3,-4,2) and (1,3,-1)
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    (Original post by Anon-)
    hey guys, what's a good resource to learn/practice reduction formulae? looking at the spec they give examples like I=sin(nx)/sinx, are there a textbooks/video tutorials that go over more complicated reduction formulae?
    I don't think they'll be that difficult. You'll always pretty much have to use the chain rule and if you can't see it then just try fiddling with the integral a bit.
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    In which situations do we have to normalise vectors??
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    (Original post by the-anonymous-me)
    In which situations do we have to normalise vectors??
    they'll tell you when to normalise it or they'll say something along the lines find P - P being the normalised eigenvectors combined.
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    (Original post by Major-fury)
    they'll tell you when to normalise it or they'll say something along the lines find P - P being the normalised eigenvectors combined.

    Thanks

    ALSO - which formulas do we need to know besides the ones that are in the formula booklet - the only one i can think of is the volume of a revolution??
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    (Original post by the-anonymous-me)
    Thanks

    ALSO - which formulas do we need to know besides the ones that are in the formula booklet - the only one i can think of is the volume of a revolution??
    There are lots for vectors. You should be able to find them in the book such as the most common a.b=|a||b|cos(theta)

    for proving it is orthogonal you do M(M transposed) = I
    the inverse
    area or volume for parellepipid or tetrahedron or triangle parallelogram
    etc

    look through the book for more i'm a bit busy sorry
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    (Original post by Major-fury)
    There are lots for vectors. You should be able to find them in the book such as the most common a.b=|a||b|cos(theta)

    for proving it is orthogonal you do M(M transposed) = I
    the inverse
    area or volume for parellepipid or tetrahedron or triangle parallelogram
    etc

    look through the book for more i'm a bit busy sorry

    Thanks x
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    Do we need to know the graphs for tanhx, cothx, cosechx, & sechx? Would rather only memorise coshx & sinhx if i can get away with it
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    (Original post by ChrisP97)
    Do we need to know the graphs for tanhx, cothx, cosechx, & sechx? Would rather only memorise coshx & sinhx if i can get away with it
    You need to be able to sketch and recall properties of all six hyperbolic functions and their inverses. 12 in total. Graphs have never been tested I don't think.
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    (Original post by oinkk)
    Graphs have never been tested I don't think.
    2011 Question 5
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    (Original post by Major-fury)
    Oh i was having trouble with that at first but i'll try to break it down to you.
    there's one plane with equation r.(3,-4,2)=5 and r.(1,3,-1)=0 ---- this one is from taking out 3 from (3,9,-3) and using the dot product on (0,0,0)
    after having the two equations, r.(3,-4,2)=5 and r(1,3,-1)=0 you do simultaneous equations from letting x=0, which would be -4x+2y=5, 3x-y=0 --- when solving these you get (0,5/2,15/2) -- this is your position vector.
    the direction would be the cross multiplication of (3,-4,2) and (1,3,-1)
    I dont quite follow this: "there's one plane with equation r.(3,-4,2)=5 and r.(1,3,-1)=0 ---- this one is from taking out 3 from (3,9,-3) and using the dot product on (0,0,0)
    after having the two equations, r.(3,-4,2)=5 and r(1,3,-1)=0 you do simultaneous equations from letting x=0, which would be -4x+2y=5, 3x-y=0 --- "
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    (Original post by Jack_Linaker)
    Does this help at all?

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    Thanks a lot! I'm just wondering if there's a quicker way to find the co-ords of a point of the line. The textbook showed some long method to find the cartesian equation of the line and then to convert that into vector form, but the ms had a quick way of finding the direction vector, and they dont show any working out for finding the point on the line, so maybe there's a quicker way?
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    (Original post by oinkk)
    You need to be able to sketch and recall properties of all six hyperbolic functions and their inverses. 12 in total. Graphs have never been tested I don't think.
    It has only come up once.
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    Name:  ImageUploadedByStudent Room1466875049.094976.jpg
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Size:  100.2 KB When do I use the sin teetha formula? And what does it actually mean


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    (Original post by target21859)
    It has only come up once.
    (Original post by edothero)
    2011 Question 5
    Cheers guys! Forgot about that one. ChrisP97
 
 
 
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