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    I seriously admire you guys, my sister did her PGCE last year and she literally had no time to herself i must have only seen her three times that year. The hard work pays off though, she's been lucky enough to get a job teaching in a secondary school in London.

    I was considering a career in teaching before she told me what the PGCE involves and how draining it is. I think i'll stalk this thread, in an attempt to regain the urge to teach.
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    (Original post by Lecture Me)
    I seriously admire you guys, my sister did her PGCE last year and she literally had no time to herself i must have only seen her three times that year. The hard work pays off though, she's been lucky enough to get a job teaching in a secondary school in London.

    I was considering a career in teaching before she told me what the PGCE involves and how draining it is. I think i'll stalk this thread, in an attempt to regain the urge to teach.
    It's not all bad, promise It is tough, yeah, as I'm finding out. Don't underestimate that! But seems to be worth it as far as I can tell...
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    I think I have commitment issues lol. My STCC mentioned a previous pupil who was so determined to make everything perfect, that she would spend hours and hours skirting around the nitty gritty of actually completing a lesson plan. Tonight, I've been like that. I teach my first lesson this week and it is on number sequences. I've got a split year group class, as well as a couple of SEN children, so I need to get my level just right with lots of differentiation. After an awful lot of thinking about it and trying to come up with ideas, I've decided I am going to link it to the class theme of rainforests. I've spent the last hour or more making activities for two of my four groups. Whilst I've got my learning objectives on the proper planning sheet, I haven't managed to add anything else. And, I've two more groups to create resources for. I really want this lesson to go well - I think that would be a huge confidence boost - but I am quite shocked by how long I've spent on it already. :/

    Fingers crossed I am only this bad because it is my first lesson lol. I can't spend all year taking this long - I'll drown!
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    I feel exactly like you.. its taken me AAALLLLL weekend, about 25hours in total to create 3 lessons (THREE!) because I've been creating differentiated worksheets and outcomes. These are to be taught at the end of this week, and then I'm teaching 9hours the week after, I'm not sure that there are enough hours in the day to plan that many lessons
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    (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
    I've not been a mentor for about 12 years now, and my observations from afar suggest it's got even more paper heavy and busy-work dependent than it was then, so maybe more people are allowed to fall by the wayside these days.
    In my experience, people are encouraged to drop out rather than being failed. If you drop out of the placement before you're pushed out by failing then you've technically got the option of repeating the placement at a later date providing the university and GTC (I think its them) agree whereas if you fail then its harder for them to let you repeat a placement. I also felt that schools were quite happy to put people on cause for concern. These people didn't fail in the end, but I knew a lot of people who ended up on cause for concern at the end of our second placement because their schools felt that they weren't ready to take full responsibility for a class in September and needed intervention.

    On my PGCE, around 20-25% of people dropped out during the year. Some people just realised they didn't enjoy it whereas others really struggled in school and just weren't cut out to teach. If they hadn't dropped out then they would have been failed, as the people I knew went to meetings to decide what they were going to do about it. I suppose in terms of the university its better for them to have a high drop out rate than a high fail rate as if its a drop out rate then they can just imply that these people weren't suited to teaching so left on their own accord whereas a fail rate would make prospective trainee teachers worry more.
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    (Original post by jaime1986)
    I feel exactly like you.. its taken me AAALLLLL weekend, about 25hours in total to create 3 lessons (THREE!) because I've been creating differentiated worksheets and outcomes. These are to be taught at the end of this week, and then I'm teaching 9hours the week after, I'm not sure that there are enough hours in the day to plan that many lessons
    So is it the creation of resources that's taking you longer, not coming up with ideas? That's happening to me, I can bash out a few ideas fairly quickly (they might not be great...) but it's the powerpoint making and worksheet making and course form filling that gets me. I can only presume that gets easier once you've taught for a couple of years as you end up using largely the same stuff.
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    Hahaha I got a MASSIVE compliment from the teacher I've been having problems with today, because I essentially emulated one of his lessons at last rather than trying out my own thing, he loved it! "That's the best lesson you've ever given" was exactly what he said.

    To be fair, he has a point, it worked. So I'll carry on doing it where I can! But I shouldn't only be getting praise when I do what he wants so I'm still annoyed with him!

    (am I being too stubborn?)
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    (Original post by oxymoronic)
    In my experience, people are encouraged to drop out rather than being failed. If you drop out of the placement before you're pushed out by failing then you've technically got the option of repeating the placement at a later date providing the university and GTC (I think its them) agree whereas if you fail then its harder for them to let you repeat a placement. I also felt that schools were quite happy to put people on cause for concern. These people didn't fail in the end, but I knew a lot of people who ended up on cause for concern at the end of our second placement because their schools felt that they weren't ready to take full responsibility for a class in September and needed intervention.

    On my PGCE, around 20-25% of people dropped out during the year. Some people just realised they didn't enjoy it whereas others really struggled in school and just weren't cut out to teach. If they hadn't dropped out then they would have been failed, as the people I knew went to meetings to decide what they were going to do about it. I suppose in terms of the university its better for them to have a high drop out rate than a high fail rate as if its a drop out rate then they can just imply that these people weren't suited to teaching so left on their own accord whereas a fail rate would make prospective trainee teachers worry more.
    I'm sure you're right. The attrition rate was 25% when I did mine, which was (ahem) 29 years ago. I'm pretty sure a lot of it's to do with university funding also. There are just some people for whom it's just cruelty to dumb animals to have them carry on, but I suspect those are fewer than they used to be, since getting on the course to do a PCGE is so much harder than it used to be. I'm glad it's not me having to do the interviewing/observing/mentoring anymore, to be honest. The paperwork seems to have got to lunatic proportions and I really can't see that it produces better teachers. There's no substitute for learning by doing, really.
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    (Original post by noodles!)
    Hahaha I got a MASSIVE compliment from the teacher I've been having problems with today, because I essentially emulated one of his lessons at last rather than trying out my own thing, he loved it! "That's the best lesson you've ever given" was exactly what he said.

    To be fair, he has a point, it worked. So I'll carry on doing it where I can! But I shouldn't only be getting praise when I do what he wants so I'm still annoyed with him!

    (am I being too stubborn?)
    Be pragmatic. Do it like he does until you've become ruler of your own classroom and can do whatever works for you. It's a hard enough year as it is without battling with your mentor all the time.
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    How exactly do you fail? How are you just not cut out to be a teacher? I'm just curious really. Is it things like just not being able to control the children, poor subject knowledge? I only got satisfactory for my first placement because of confidence issues mostly (not formally assessed though) so I'm hoping that that was the case rather than just not being cut out for it. Of course I need to give myself a proper chance, I'm just curious what I've had to do badly wrong to actually fail.
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    Reading through some of these posts has massively put me off doing the PGCE!
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    (Original post by jenren22)
    How exactly do you fail? How are you just not cut out to be a teacher? I'm just curious really. Is it things like just not being able to control the children, poor subject knowledge? I only got satisfactory for my first placement because of confidence issues mostly (not formally assessed though) so I'm hoping that that was the case rather than just not being cut out for it. Of course I need to give myself a proper chance, I'm just curious what I've had to do badly wrong to actually fail.
    It's failing in all areas at once, really. Somebody who can't relate to kids, can't communicate, hasn't enough subject knowledge, doesn't put the time in, all that kind of thing. (Although there are plenty of people doing the job for whom that is also true!) I haven't been a mentor recently enough to be able to quote any official criteria, but you can spot it a mile off. When you've been doing the job a while, it's comforting to watch an outside speaker without experience of kids or talking to an audience coming in to do an assembly. You'll soon learn to value the things you can do effortlessly and be able to pat yourself on the back about what you have learned. I once went back to the staff room and laughed until I cried when some poor unfortunate woman from a really worthy charity came to speak to our sixth form and spoke to them as if they were 5, but I'd had a bad day and had been thinking that I was losing my touch. Seeing it done wrong can be tremendously helpful!
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    Just booked my QTS skills tests!
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    (Original post by FerretOnAcid)
    Reading through some of these posts has massively put me off doing the PGCE!
    Don't be put off! Just remember that online posts are ideal for venting, everyone is more likely to post when upset than when things are going well, so most of what you see will be negative.

    Nobody who's doing/done it will tell you it's easy, 'cause it's not, but it's certainly do-able and enjoyable at times!
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      The 10th circle of Dante's Inferno should be reserved for endless, tortuous, back-breaking filing. So many pieces of paper to arrange into so many already-straining ringbinders. It's like a card sort from Hell. Higher-order thinking eat your heart out.

      On the plus side, I can't wait to see Year 7's faces when I cut up a teddy bear with scissors on Weds morning.
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      (Original post by Rainy)
      The 10th circle of Dante's Inferno should be reserved for endless, tortuous, back-breaking filing. So many pieces of paper to arrange into so many already-straining ringbinders. It's like a card sort from Hell. Higher-order thinking eat your heart out.

      On the plus side, I can't wait to see Year 7's faces when I cut up a teddy bear with scissors on Weds morning.
      Ah, sadism. One of the best reasons for going into teaching.
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      (Original post by myblueheaven339)
      Just booked my QTS skills tests!
      I meant to pos that to wish you luck. Sorry!!!

      Good luck!!
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      (Original post by carnationlilyrose)
      Be pragmatic. Do it like he does until you've become ruler of your own classroom and can do whatever works for you. It's a hard enough year as it is without battling with your mentor all the time.
      I was told to expect to have to "play the game" so I guess I just need to get on with it.

      If anything I'll now be antagonising the nice mentor as her classroom doesn't lend itself to rotating pairwork without chaos!
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      I have 3 really detailed lessons to plan for tomorrow. Tonight will be fun...
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      (Original post by noodles!)
      So is it the creation of resources that's taking you longer, not coming up with ideas? That's happening to me, I can bash out a few ideas fairly quickly (they might not be great...) but it's the powerpoint making and worksheet making and course form filling that gets me. I can only presume that gets easier once you've taught for a couple of years as you end up using largely the same stuff.
      Definitely! I can get a clear vision of what I want to do with the class pretty quickly, but it's creating the differentiated worksheets, and the detailed learning outcomes for all levels as well as the PowerPoint etc that is taking too long. If I can't cut the time it takes in a few weeks, then I have no idea how I will plan all of my lessons
     
     
     
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