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    I was ok. I was depressed and still am, but by myself when no-one knew I was ok. Then I ran out of college/sixth form, and attempted suicide. I was reffered to Camhs immediately, and told that the staff where watching me the whole time since I had started high school. After that point i havn't been the same since. I can't stay in any room with anyone, and if anyone laughs i can't cope. That's why I walked out in the first place. I had to stop seeing them, as my mum told me to tell them I didn't want to go anymore. I did, and they were suspicous about that. Nearly 1 year later and i'm seeing them again. They moved me out of my home, and won't allow me to exit their services. I am nearly 18 years old now, and they said that once i have turned 18 I'm still not allowed to discharge myself, and my carer won't discharge me. I've told them that I want my mum to get help even though she doesn't want it, and that the only way, which they agreed with me, for her to be forced to get the help she needs, is to kill myself, with vodka, as i'm a diabetic as well and my blood glucose readings have never been normal since i got it when i was 2 1/2 years old. I'm waiting until my 18th birthday when i should be allowed to buy some vodka, and then i'll just drink the whole bottle without eating, like i did when i didn't eat for 15 hours and trapped myself in my bedroom with wood and a bed sofa. I don't enjoy life, and I don't want to keep going if my mum isn't going to get any better in her health. I just can't cope with it, so it is something that I must do.
    • #51
    #51

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've suffered from pretty severe OCD for five years now; it crushed myself confidence and made me a pretty messed up individual.

    Only now am I kind of coming to terms with the fact that I really do need help (taken long enough)..and I'm so tired of having to pretend everything's okay- I daren't moan about it incase I annoy people.

    My parents still don't know but I hate to admit I can't help but feel ashamed and embarassed even though I know I shouldn't.

    Anyway, I'm interested in how people handle it whether it's yourself or someone you know.

    I think that there should be more of an emphasis on recognising mental illnesses because in my experience nobody really talks about them because they're kind of invisible if you get what I mean and my parents have often just labelled me as a 'hormonal' teenager :/

    DO NOT Feel embarrassed or ashamed of who you are. Yes, you have an illness, but it is not your fault. Please. Sit your parents down, and explain to them that you think you need help,and really need their support so maybe things can get a little bit better for you.



    My 'rents both got very depressed after they split up, and that was tough to watch.Apart from a lack of confidence, I'm mentally fit. In my view confidence issues should be classed as mental illness-I can't look at myself in the mirror without thinking "Egh" and I can't make eye contact either. I know that's no where near as bad as many people, Including yourself, but I'm sure many people suffer from the shame issues, and it's not nice. Hopefully when we get out of these damn teenage years, things will get better.

    Good luck ,op. I really hope everything works okay for you sweetie. :-)x
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've suffered from pretty severe OCD for five years now; it crushed myself confidence and made me a pretty messed up individual.

    Only now am I kind of coming to terms with the fact that I really do need help (taken long enough)..and I'm so tired of having to pretend everything's okay- I daren't moan about it incase I annoy people.

    My parents still don't know but I hate to admit I can't help but feel ashamed and embarassed even though I know I shouldn't.

    Anyway, I'm interested in how people handle it whether it's yourself or someone you know.

    I think that there should be more of an emphasis on recognising mental illnesses because in my experience nobody really talks about them because they're kind of invisible if you get what I mean and my parents have often just labelled me as a 'hormonal' teenager :/
    I would actually argue that there is no such thing as mental illnesses, in the sense it is an "illness". Rather, some peoples behaviour is different to the "social norms" and people are stigmitized because of this. I used to think i suffered from depression and aniexity, and gradually overtime learnt to realise it wasn't a illness and that I could just not be depressed or anxious all the time from changing my behaviour. I personally would never take any drugs for mental "illnesses", because it is not an illness and i wouldn't want to take poisonous and addictive substances in order to be "normal". Drugs dont treat the "disorder", but rather masks the supposed symptoms which doesn't work and has terrible side effects.
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    (Original post by sally12379823)
    I would actually argue that there is no such thing as mental illnesses, in the sense it is an "illness". Rather, some peoples behaviour is different to the "social norms" and people are stigmitized because of this. I used to think i suffered from depression and aniexity, and gradually overtime learnt to realise it wasn't a illness and that I could just not be depressed or anxious all the time from changing my behaviour. I personally would never take any drugs for mental "illnesses", because it is not an illness and i wouldn't want to take poisonous and addictive substances in order to be "normal". Drugs dont treat the "disorder", but rather masks the supposed symptoms which doesn't work and has terrible side effects.
    To be honest, you can call it what the **** you want. It doesn't subtract from the fact that there are people going through extreme distress because of their experiences, and that those individuals should be offered help, as this thread nothing but demonstrates.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    To be honest, you can call it what the **** you want. It doesn't subtract from the fact that there are people going through extreme distress because of their experiences, and that those individuals should be offered help, as this thread nothing but demonstrates.
    I'm not saying that people don't suffer from problems, but calling this an illness is just a lie and in my opinion doesn't help people change there behaviour
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    (Original post by sally12379823)


    I'm not saying that people don't suffer from problems, but calling this an illness is just a lie and in my opinion doesn't help people change there behaviour
    What would you call it?
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    What would you call it?
    It's not a illness, and having previously experienced what you would class as depression and anxiety, it does absolutely nothing to help it by saying it is. Sure people might want help with there behaviour if they think it's problematic, but that is not an illness.
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    (Original post by sally12379823)
    It's not a illness, and having previously experienced what you would class as depression and anxiety, it does absolutely nothing to help it by saying it is. Sure people might want help with there behaviour if they think it's problematic, but that is not an illness.
    Doesn't answer the question though.

    Actually, if you're interested in this kind of thing, a psychiatrist called Jan Foundraine wrote a book about his attempts to redefine mental illness under a different semantic system, including his role as a psychiatrist. Essentially he turned his part of a psychiatric hospital into a school and took up the role of an educator. The book documents the subsequent impact of medicalizing this issue. The book is called Not Made of Wood if youre interested.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've suffered from pretty severe OCD for five years now; it crushed myself confidence and made me a pretty messed up individual.

    Only now am I kind of coming to terms with the fact that I really do need help (taken long enough)..and I'm so tired of having to pretend everything's okay- I daren't moan about it incase I annoy people.

    My parents still don't know but I hate to admit I can't help but feel ashamed and embarassed even though I know I shouldn't.

    Anyway, I'm interested in how people handle it whether it's yourself or someone you know.

    I think that there should be more of an emphasis on recognising mental illnesses because in my experience nobody really talks about them because they're kind of invisible if you get what I mean and my parents have often just labelled me as a 'hormonal' teenager :/
    Firstly, I'm glad to read you have acknowledged you need help, and that you are now seeking some support with that, that's brill

    Well, I personally haven't suffered with any sort of mental illness, but when I was 14-15, my best male friend was taken to a mental institute, and I really didn't handle that well, especially since he said, and I too thought, that it was my fault that he was taken there. He had been down for months, and he used to talk to me everyday about how he felt etc, and he slowly but surely just deteriorated and got harded to be with. I then started to develop feelings for him, (whilst already having a boyfriend) and gahh it was a messed up situation, and probably one of the roughest patches of my life so far. A member of my immediate family also suffers with clinical depression, so I would say I have had my fair share of mental illness association :P

    On the plus side, I'm glad the media and society in general have started to draw more attention about mental illness; I particularly like the new advert about time to change made me giggle :http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dTgA...feature=relmfu

    Teeheee!
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    Doesn't answer the question though.

    Actually, if you're interested in this kind of thing, a psychiatrist called Jan Foundraine wrote a book about his attempts to redefine mental illness under a different semantic system, including his role as a psychiatrist. Essentially he turned his part of a psychiatric hospital into a school and took up the role of an educator. The book documents the subsequent impact of medicalizing this issue. The book is called Not Made of Wood if youre interested.
    I don't have an answer as to what to call it tbh, and that looks really interesting, is the book online anywhere?
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    My mums going to the docs to sort her medication out hopefully that means less aggro in the house :erm: I cant help but feel I'm slowly sinking into depression as well >.<
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    People always think I'm frowning and sometimes my facial expressions are weird and I blink creepily but otherwise it's not too bad. Could be much worse, anyway.
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    (Original post by sally12379823)
    It's not a illness, and having previously experienced what you would class as depression and anxiety, it does absolutely nothing to help it by saying it is. Sure people might want help with there behaviour if they think it's problematic, but that is not an illness.
    It may have done nothing to help you. How can you speak for everyone though? Whilst a diagnosis could become a self-fulfilling prophecy for some, it might help others come to terms with what they've gone through and move forward. I don't think you should be so quick to judge other people's experiences of mental illness from your own somewhat limited one.

    From reading this thread it's pretty obvious that their are different kinds of mental illness and degrees of severity. You might think that someone who feels low and anxious isn't 'ill' (and others would disagree with you) - what about someone who hears voices and cannot tell the difference between what is real and what is not? Someone in a depressive stupor who is unable to sleep, eat, concentrate, or take care of themselves? If you don't think schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, etc are 'illnesses' I think you at least have to accept that they are out of a person's control and no amount of 'willpower' or just 'changing the way you think' is going to solve the problem.
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    I've pushed away so many friends. So many wasted opportunities. /:
    I feel so bad for everyone around me.
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    (Original post by sally12379823)
    I don't have an answer as to what to call it tbh, and that looks really interesting, is the book online anywhere?
    So how can you say it is not an illness. How would you define illness?
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    (Original post by sally12379823)
    I don't have an answer as to what to call it tbh, and that looks really interesting, is the book online anywhere?
    Fraid not. It's on amazon though:

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Not-Made-Woo...1821924&sr=8-1

    It's hard to find a copy in English as it was originally written in Dutch.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've suffered from pretty severe OCD for five years now; it crushed myself confidence and made me a pretty messed up individual.

    Only now am I kind of coming to terms with the fact that I really do need help (taken long enough)..and I'm so tired of having to pretend everything's okay- I daren't moan about it incase I annoy people.

    My parents still don't know but I hate to admit I can't help but feel ashamed and embarassed even though I know I shouldn't.

    Anyway, I'm interested in how people handle it whether it's yourself or someone you know.

    I think that there should be more of an emphasis on recognising mental illnesses because in my experience nobody really talks about them because they're kind of invisible if you get what I mean and my parents have often just labelled me as a 'hormonal' teenager :/
    I'm bipolar. It gets pretty bad, but having people around me who get me helps. It's made me a stronger person though..sooo.
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    I've had bipolar since 2006. Well it was probably always there but hadn't manifested itself properly. I've been hospitalised cos of a few manic episodes and although I tried to stay in university I couldn't. (Not because I was depressed oddly enough but the two previous manic episodes were both at uni and caused me to drop out, switch course to something I never liked and knock my academic drive dead). There are positive traits to it, many of life's "greats" have it/have had it and if you learn how to use it properly there's no doubt it can be a positive thing. But currently I'm not getting it under control (and it's my fault really in many ways, but in many ways it's not). I know that there's steps I can take to make it easier for me but it's stopping me living my life in the sense that it holds me back from things and its stopped me getitng my degree. I live in hope, and this is from the perspective of one of my better moods, that one day I'll be able to manage it (but anyone that has it will know how difficult that is, and that's without taking my own circumstances into account). IDK really. I can't think about the ifs and buts I've just got to live on the what is, accept it (which I am) and try to manage it (which I'm trying to do)
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    Quick question

    I haven't been to my GP in over a year about my mental health (depression and self harm as a result) and I'm wanting to join the army next year. How realistic is this? Please don't give any opinion on my situation, I just want to know if my dream is possible.
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    Good thread.
 
 
 
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