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2015 Physics Applicants Watch

  • View Poll Results: Which Physics course(s) are you going to apply for?
    Physics BSc
    26.85%
    Physics MSci
    49.54%
    Theoretical Physics/ Phys & Maths BSc
    7.41%
    Theoretical Physics/ Phys & Maths MSci
    15.74%
    Physics with Astrophysics BSc
    7.87%
    Physics with Astrophysics MSci
    12.50%
    Physics and Philosophy BSc
    1.39%
    Physics and Philosophy MSci
    4.17%

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    (Original post by StarvingAutist)
    That 90% offer from Lancaster looks terrifying :eek:

    By the way, if your Polish is as good as your English (I'd guess so) you'll be fine for your Polish lit exam! Be positive good luck!
    Haha, thanks a ton, I wish that were true ! I'm afraid it's more about 'analysing tons and tons of books and paintings, making note of their origin, when they were created and what problems they refer to' than 'being proficient in the language' though, it's all really difficult and not useful for anything after the exam's over, unless you're interested in studying liberal arts :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by katiecharc)
    They were just "thank you for applying" letters... but I just got an offer through from UCLan about 10 minutes ago! ABC for physics w/ astrophysics MPhys. I'm so happy right now!
    Great!
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    (Original post by Spongelk)
    Haha, thanks a ton, I wish that were true ! I'm afraid it's more about 'analysing tons and tons of books and paintings, making note of their origin, when they were created and what problems they refer to' than 'being proficient in the language' though, it's all really difficult and not useful for anything after the exam's over, unless you're interested in studying liberal arts :rolleyes:
    Yeah sounds familiar... I think the key tactic in exams like this is bull****ting
    By the way, what books do you have to read? I've never heard of any Polish literature. Are there any hidden gems?
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    (Original post by StarvingAutist)
    Yeah sounds familiar... I think the key tactic in exams like this is bull****ting
    By the way, what books do you have to read? I've never heard of any Polish literature. Are there any hidden gems?
    Well, there are certainly some books worth reading, but it depends on what's your cup of tea obviously! The passing of time, frankly, hasn't been kind to the ones considered the 'most important' to the Polish history - us young Poles struggle to read through them and barely feel any connection to their plots and characters, so I highly doubt anyone from outside the Slavic culture would find them enjoyable. But then, there are a couple works that I would personally recommend to anyone, no matter their nationality. The one title that immediately comes to mind is 'Ferdydurke' by Witold Gombrowicz (available in English) - a surrealistic novel, difficult to understand at first, but making so much sense in its irrationality it's not even funny :-)
    There are a couple other writers - I guess you know Joseph Conrad, he wrote in English after all; then there's Ryszard Kapuscinski (a journalist, his travel books are really gripping), Jan Potocki's 'The Manuscript Found in Saragossa' (it's a lesser-known one for some reason, but it hasn't aged one bit, you don't need to know its background to enjoy it - I know, I didn't), Bruno Schulz's 'The Street of Crocodiles', and that's it from what I recall. Just to make it clear, there are dozens more titles we have to read at school, but - although by no means bad - they either require a lot of background knowledge and understanding of the Poles' struggles, or are plain unenjoyable. :-)
    Apart from that, we read some foreign literature of course, mostly German and Russian with hints of French and English (Shakespeare, oh yeah, I once tried to read it in English and I gave up after ~30 pages of constant usage of a dictionary )
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    (Original post by Tibbz2)
    I already have an A* in maths but have an offer of AAA "with an A in maths and physics"?

    Plus their site said AAB with further maths, which is what im doing this year... slightly confusing
    That must mean AA further & Physics
    There should be a contact at the bottom of their ucas letter to ask to clarify!
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    (Original post by Spongelk)
    Well, there are certainly some books worth reading, but it depends on what's your cup of tea obviously! The passing of time, frankly, hasn't been kind to the ones considered the 'most important' to the Polish history - us young Poles struggle to read through them and barely feel any connection to their plots and characters, so I highly doubt anyone from outside the Slavic culture would find them enjoyable. But then, there are a couple works that I would personally recommend to anyone, no matter their nationality. The one title that immediately comes to mind is 'Ferdydurke' by Witold Gombrowicz (available in English) - a surrealistic novel, difficult to understand at first, but making so much sense in its irrationality it's not even funny :-)
    There are a couple other writers - I guess you know Joseph Conrad, he wrote in English after all; then there's Ryszard Kapuscinski (a journalist, his travel books are really gripping), Jan Potocki's 'The Manuscript Found in Saragossa' (it's a lesser-known one for some reason, but it hasn't aged one bit, you don't need to know its background to enjoy it - I know, I didn't), Bruno Schulz's 'The Street of Crocodiles', and that's it from what I recall. Just to make it clear, there are dozens more titles we have to read at school, but - although by no means bad - they either require a lot of background knowledge and understanding of the Poles' struggles, or are plain unenjoyable. :-)
    Apart from that, we read some foreign literature of course, mostly German and Russian with hints of French and English (Shakespeare, oh yeah, I once tried to read it in English and I gave up after ~30 pages of constant usage of a dictionary )
    Your English is stupidly good
    You write better than most of my classmates
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    (Original post by Spongelk)
    Well, there are certainly some books worth reading, but it depends on what's your cup of tea obviously! The passing of time, frankly, hasn't been kind to the ones considered the 'most important' to the Polish history - us young Poles struggle to read through them and barely feel any connection to their plots and characters, so I highly doubt anyone from outside the Slavic culture would find them enjoyable. But then, there are a couple works that I would personally recommend to anyone, no matter their nationality. The one title that immediately comes to mind is 'Ferdydurke' by Witold Gombrowicz (available in English) - a surrealistic novel, difficult to understand at first, but making so much sense in its irrationality it's not even funny :-)
    There are a couple other writers - I guess you know Joseph Conrad, he wrote in English after all; then there's Ryszard Kapuscinski (a journalist, his travel books are really gripping), Jan Potocki's 'The Manuscript Found in Saragossa' (it's a lesser-known one for some reason, but it hasn't aged one bit, you don't need to know its background to enjoy it - I know, I didn't), Bruno Schulz's 'The Street of Crocodiles', and that's it from what I recall. Just to make it clear, there are dozens more titles we have to read at school, but - although by no means bad - they either require a lot of background knowledge and understanding of the Poles' struggles, or are plain unenjoyable. :-)
    Apart from that, we read some foreign literature of course, mostly German and Russian with hints of French and English (Shakespeare, oh yeah, I once tried to read it in English and I gave up after ~30 pages of constant usage of a dictionary )
    Thanks a lot for that! I'll definitely put 'Ferdydurke' on my reading list; it sounds great. I've heard of Joseph Conrad, yeah. I think I'll check out everything you mentioned tbh - I know almost nothing about Poland and that should probably change.
    You get to read foreign literature? That's not fair! We don't get to read anything foreign... even American authors have been removed from the syllabus. Do you get to read Dostoevsky? I absolutely love Crime and Punishment
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    (Original post by DanRigg96#)
    Your English is stupidly good
    You write better than most of my classmates
    Haha, that's not true, I just don't know English enough to use common words instead of profound ones


    (Original post by StarvingAutist)
    Thanks a lot for that! I'll definitely put 'Ferdydurke' on my reading list; it sounds great. I've heard of Joseph Conrad, yeah. I think I'll check out everything you mentioned tbh - I know almost nothing about Poland and that should probably change.
    You get to read foreign literature? That's not fair! We don't get to read anything foreign... even American authors have been removed from the syllabus. Do you get to read Dostoevsky? I absolutely love Crime and Punishment
    No one's going to judge you for not being interested in Polish culture, we're a people with victim mentality and a history of emmigration
    And yeah, Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment is considered a masterpiece in Poland and widely read, it's one of my favourite books as well! Have you checked out any other works of his? The Devils is great, and I heard some people say they loved The Idiot!
    Still, my favourite Russian writer is Bulgakov - in fact, The Master and Margarita is easily my favourite novel! I'm currently reading Chekhov's short stories, too, and loving them to bits. Do you mostly read modern English books, or is it stuff from all throughout the ages?
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    (Original post by Spongelk)
    Haha, that's not true, I just don't know English enough to use common words instead of profound ones



    No one's going to judge you for not being interested in Polish culture, we're a people with victim mentality and a history of emmigration
    And yeah, Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment is considered a masterpiece in Poland and widely read, it's one of my favourite books as well! Have you checked out any other works of his? The Devils is great, and I heard some people say they loved The Idiot!
    Still, my favourite Russian writer is Bulgakov - in fact, The Master and Margarita is easily my favourite novel! I'm currently reading Chekhov's short stories, too, and loving them to bits. Do you mostly read modern English books, or is it stuff from all throughout the ages?
    That'll come when you start speaking it around everyone... WHEN you get to an English University 😄
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    (Original post by Spongelk)
    No one's going to judge you for not being interested in Polish culture, we're a people with victim mentality and a history of emmigration
    And yeah, Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment is considered a masterpiece in Poland and widely read, it's one of my favourite books as well! Have you checked out any other works of his? The Devils is great, and I heard some people say they loved The Idiot!
    Still, my favourite Russian writer is Bulgakov - in fact, The Master and Margarita is easily my favourite novel! I'm currently reading Chekhov's short stories, too, and loving them to bits. Do you mostly read modern English books, or is it stuff from all throughout the ages?
    Haha, don't put it that way! Every country has a history worth learning
    I have The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov on my bookshelf, but I haven't read them yet. I really should! :lol: I also have The Master and Margarita, and I'll definitely get round to that soon. I haven't read that much, but I'm not picky. I don't generally read recently-published books - I have so many old books to read first!
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    Imperial interview tomorrow agh
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    Anyone else interview at Lancaster today? Got made the standard offer of A*AA and had a pretty enjoyable day overall - starting with a 45 min tour of the physics department, then lunch, then two lectures one on course overview and another on 'Electronics with single electrons', then group activities on fairly vague problems that required a lot of discussion with interviews going on during that. The interview itself was relaxed and involved demonstrating simple mathematical skills with physical equations - the speed of a satellite orbiting earth in my case
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    (Original post by emmalem2406)
    Ah that's what I've applied for too! How long did it take for you to hear?
    I think it was about a week, it was my first offer. Good luck!


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    (Original post by DanRigg96#)
    That must mean AA further & Physics
    There should be a contact at the bottom of their ucas letter to ask to clarify!
    Emailed their admissions, hopefully they can clarify!

    Cheers
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    (Original post by Planckton)
    Imperial interview tomorrow agh
    Good luck

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by StarvingAutist)
    Good luck

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    Thank you
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    Getting worried reading about all the interviewso taking place during visit days. My daughter declined the invitations as we live abroad, but having regrets even if they said they weren't obligatory. She hasn't heard any more from southampton or king's since declining a few weeks ago.
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    (Original post by adri57)
    Getting worried reading about all the interviewso taking place during visit days. My daughter declined the invitations as we live abroad, but having regrets even if they said they weren't obligatory. She hasn't heard any more from southampton or king's since declining a few weeks ago.
    Maybe email and speak to the admissions tutor about a video interview over Skype?
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    (Original post by adri57)
    Getting worried reading about all the interviewso taking place during visit days. My daughter declined the invitations as we live abroad, but having regrets even if they said they weren't obligatory. She hasn't heard any more from southampton or king's since declining a few weeks ago.
    Don't worry, I had an interview over Skype from Lancaster and got an offer :-)

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    Thanks! But is it really done to ask for a Skype interview, or better to hang on and see if the universities ask for it?
 
 
 
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