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    (Original post by 0011Abcdefg)
    Also if someone is not fully passionate about teaching but can't think of anything else as a future career choice would you still advise to go through with teaching degree or?
    No. I don't think it will end well; you need to be fully committed to teaching to succeed, generally. Half-hearted doesn't tend to go far in teaching.

    (Original post by YuS97)
    I got CCE aat my AS this year but should have got BBB... i didn't really do much of my homework. Should i resit the year or resit the bad exams (2) also should i resit 2 of my maths modules? i got C in c1 D in C2 and B in S1. I think i should resit C1 and C2 (ocr mei) because i know i can do much better. What do u think it will take for me to get an overall score of BBB/BBC. I'm retaking 1 from my C and 1 from my E. my A2 exams start 1 month after that. Any advise?
    I would definitely resit Core 1 as that just has to be an A to be honest. Be careful, though, as Core 3 and 4 are probably the most difficult modules so you will need to really work hard on your understanding there. Make use of your teachers as much as you can.
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    (Original post by JanitaTwain)
    Your view maybe be biased, as you mainly interact with girls that are (probably) not as interested or invested as those in other sets. I find that the behaviour in different sets varies hugely.
    I just find a lot of the girls I teach to be very confrontational and argue so much. Even when I haven't singled them out, they seem to think I'm talking to them so I get "why the **** are you picking on me!?" to which I calmly reply "I wasn't speaking to you, I was speaking to the class"...


    (Original post by oreoenthusiast)
    Would you ever want to teach in a private school?
    No, because I wouldn't be able to relate to them at all and just wouldn't feel comfortable.
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    I disagree that you're not that hard to handle.

    I mainly teach lower sets (5 out of the 6 classes I teach are low ability sets).

    You accept that you can't win every battle in terms of understanding. Sometimes the student will understand it the next time you cover the topic. As long as I've tried my best, I have no regrets.
    Ahhh. well I think that's where your problem lies.. Low level sets are always gonna have disruptions.

    I've always thought that teaching maths is not that hard compared to other subjects e.g english (obviously I'm in no position to talk as I don't teach but from my perspective) What do you think?

    Okay, well what if a student doesn't understand when you explained it in class and then asks you help for a qs to which you explain and they still don't understand. How would you deal with that?

    I'm probably annoying you right now lol.. Erm last qs - Do you get to chose what sets you want to teach? And how many sets do you have in your school?
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    Have you ever slept in the school?
    What's the most awkward situation you've been in with a parent?
    What's the most awkward situation you've been in with a student?
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    (Original post by Carrot_Cake_13)
    I've always thought that teaching maths is not that hard compared to other subjects e.g english (obviously I'm in no position to talk as I don't teach but from my perspective) What do you think?

    Okay, well what if a student doesn't understand when you explained it in class and then asks you help for a qs to which you explain and they still don't understand. How would you deal with that?

    I'm probably annoying you right now lol.. Erm last qs - Do you get to chose what sets you want to teach? And how many sets do you have in your school?
    1. It's more difficult in my opinion because, with English, for example you don't have so many "I don't get it" moments. One subject I would definitely agree is more difficult to teach is French (or any other modern language) as, in my school, it is a compulsory subject and even some of the good students misbehave and make the teacher's life hell.

    2. I often use other students (ones who do get it) to explain it to them. An hour lesson is a very short time, though, and I do accept that I can't win every battle and students will leave my room without understanding and I just need to pick myself up and get ready for my next lesson. I can't beat myself up too much for this.

    3. I don't get a choice. All year groups have sets 1 to 9 (1 being the highest ability) and I usually get anything from set 7 to set 9.
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    What language do you think in?
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    (Original post by Scienceisgood)
    Have you ever slept in the school?
    What's the most awkward situation you've been in with a parent?
    What's the most awkward situation you've been in with a student?
    1. No!
    2. Any of the numerous occasions when they've been confrontational at parents' evening and ripped into me about my teaching style ("even my pet gerbil could teach better than you..") and picking on their Year 9 daughter who is 'an angel at home'.

    3. Certainly can't think of anything that I would like to share on here.
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    (Original post by godd)
    What language do you think in?
    21st century English
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    I think the biggest problem in Maths is that kids don't get the laws of algebra.

    GCSE should focus on algebra, so kids can manipulate expressions with ease.
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    As a teacher, do you find different nationalities/races are better than others in general or a fairly mixed group in terms of achievements?
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    Don't teach algebra like...

    you add x to both sides

    It's too confusing for them.

    Should teach it like...

    if you take the x term to the other side, you change its sign


    All people good mathematicians learn algebra the second way, yet they teach it the first way.
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    And everyone solves simultaneous equations by substitution.

    Who in their mind would solve it that other awkward way.

    Again, kids need to learn algebra like a language.
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    Have you ever tried out the traffic light cup experiment when teaching maths to the younger years? It isn't reallly suitable for older kids who are too cynical, but ..

    (If you are not familiar with it - each pupil has a stack of three paper cups on their desk where the teacher can see them, green, orange and red. Green on top means you are listening and understanding. As soon as they start to misunderstand what is being taught, you remove the green to see the orange cup. The teacher can then see when they are beginning to lose the class, and eventually as cups turn red you have to give that group some extra explanation. I've seen a maths teacher astonished as the whole class turned red within 5 mins, and she had no clue that they couldn;t follow her - it transformed the class.)

    (Also if your girls think you have favourites, just use lolly sticks with names on and pick one out of a jar - no favourtism then.)
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    (Original post by HCubed)

    (Also if your girls think you have favourites, just use lolly sticks with names on and pick one out of a jar - no favourtism then.)
    I do use this! They still moan and say that I look in the jar before I pick the lolly stick!
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    (Original post by Scienceisgood)
    As a teacher, do you find different nationalities/races are better than others in general or a fairly mixed group in terms of achievements?
    My school is about 99% white although this does include a lot of Eastern Europeans. The ethnic minorities tend not to do as well as the White British students on the whole and I can think of at least 4 ethnic minority students who are among the most disruptive in the school.
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    1. No!
    2. Any of the numerous occasions when they've been confrontational at parents' evening and ripped into me about my teaching style ("even my pet gerbil could teach better than you..") and picking on their Year 9 daughter who is 'an angel at home'.

    3. Certainly can't think of anything that I would like to share on here.
    Can I guess what number 3 is?
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    (Original post by AngelPhys)
    Can I guess what number 3 is?
    No. It's nothing bad anyway. I just don't want to be too specific on here.
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    No. It's nothing bad anyway. I just don't want to be too specific on here.
    Tell pls, lol.
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    (Original post by AngelPhys)
    Tell pls, lol.
    No thank you.
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    No thank you.
    Please.
 
 
 
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