Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

How has mental illness affected your life? Watch

    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by converselove)
    Quick question

    I haven't been to my GP in over a year about my mental health (depression and self harm as a result) and I'm wanting to join the army next year. How realistic is this? Please don't give any opinion on my situation, I just want to know if my dream is possible.
    Probably not. I looked into joining the army, they told me no chance with my history of depression and self harm.

    It may depend how long you've been depressed, how much you self harmed, how long you been free etc, no one here can answer on your exact circumstances so why not go have a chat in your local recruiting office?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Dannng mental illness did something to me socially although I'm alot better now. I'm just not the same person ultimately. I don't want to delve into the drugs though.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    Probably not. I looked into joining the army, they told me no chance with my history of depression and self harm.

    It may depend how long you've been depressed, how much you self harmed, how long you been free etc, no one here can answer on your exact circumstances so why not go have a chat in your local recruiting office?
    Yeah I'll have a chat with them. Tbh, my self harm isn't that bad and I haven't actually been diagnosed with depression so the only thing my GP would have to tell the army in the medical forms is that I had a previous history of self harm. But yeah, I'll talk it over with my recruiting office. Thanks for the reply
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    An uncertain diagnosis at the moment but I had went to my doctors to discuss my problem and she thinks that I match up to the symptoms of BDD.

    My obsession with my teeth has lasted for almost a year now. All of the time I had not realised that it was taking over parts of my life and it had done in many levels.

    I noticed slight changes to my teeth, i.e. mild erosion and gum problems. This was the initial stage in my obsession and after that I bought hundreds of pounds worth of products online and through the counter, yet I had not met satisfication. I went to the dentist too often, even to the dental hospital for my anxienty and finally went privately when I hadn't gotten anywhere with the public service.

    The whole idea of obsessing reflected on the way I perceived myself in the mirror, scrutinizing each imperfection at least 5 times a day in every light, but eventually I couldn't handle looking and avoided looking in the mirror at all. It has affected me socially too, feeling paranoid of the judgements I'd receive outside, even covering my mouth to take that focus away. I still find it difficult to go out in broad daylight and I cannot meet the guy I've been yearning to see simply because I am so anxious about how he'd judge me.

    Hopefully treatment would take these thoughts away when they creep up - it's a horrible feeling.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by converselove)
    Yeah I'll have a chat with them. Tbh, my self harm isn't that bad and I haven't actually been diagnosed with depression so the only thing my GP would have to tell the army in the medical forms is that I had a previous history of self harm. But yeah, I'll talk it over with my recruiting office. Thanks for the reply
    When I talked to the RAF recruitment office, they told me that they won't accept anyone who's had more than 2 distinct "phases" of self-harm. I didn't think that was very clear to be honest, but I knew I was well above that so didn't bother following it up. Anyway, I don't know if it's the same for the Army, but that may be of some help?
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Gosh, I'd forgotten about this thread.

    So far 10 weeks of psychotic episode and no sign of it ending anytime soon. My meds have been increased and I've been given a new diagnosis of nonspecific psychotic disorder. Nonspecific coz I'm that special and confusing. Urgh :sigh:
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Gosh, I'd forgotten about this thread.

    So far 10 weeks of psychotic episode and no sign of it ending anytime soon. My meds have been increased and I've been given a new diagnosis of nonspecific psychotic disorder. Nonspecific coz I'm that special and confusing. Urgh :sigh:
    :hugs:

    I hope you get better.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Gosh, I'd forgotten about this thread.

    So far 10 weeks of psychotic episode and no sign of it ending anytime soon. My meds have been increased and I've been given a new diagnosis of nonspecific psychotic disorder. Nonspecific coz I'm that special and confusing. Urgh :sigh:
    Ouch. As a prospective psychiatrist wannabe, you must be seriously unique and confusing to warrant a diagnosis like that!

    Suddenly the "rapid cycling" tag to my bipolar doesn't seem like such a curse, at least things like that don't drag on for quite so long. o.O

    I seriously hope you get better soon, I wouldn't wish that on anyone.
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Potiron)
    :hugs:

    I hope you get better.
    Thanks


    (Original post by houseelf)
    Ouch. As a prospective psychiatrist wannabe, you must be seriously unique and confusing to warrant a diagnosis like that!

    Suddenly the "rapid cycling" tag to my bipolar doesn't seem like such a curse, at least things like that don't drag on for quite so long. o.O

    I seriously hope you get better soon, I wouldn't wish that on anyone.
    Yeah, they don't really know what to make of or do with me. On the plus side they're fairly sure it's not bipolar or schizophrenia (which was what I feared).

    I dunno, "rapid cycling" bipolar sounds like my idea of hell. 10 weeks is annoyingly long but the last episode I had was six months, so it could be far worse. I don't think I'll ever be that ill again though. It was horrendous. I don't even remember most of it now :no:
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Thanks




    Yeah, they don't really know what to make of or do with me. On the plus side they're fairly sure it's not bipolar or schizophrenia (which was what I feared).

    I dunno, "rapid cycling" bipolar sounds like my idea of hell. 10 weeks is annoyingly long but the last episode I had was six months, so it could be far worse. I don't think I'll ever be that ill again though. It was horrendous. I don't even remember most of it now :no:
    Well, I suppose that's something. Still, I suppose the name they put on it is largely irrelevant to us; all we care about is trying to stay as sane as possible, right?

    It's certainly not pleasant. I spent the last 3/4 days in a pretty terrible dysphoric mania, and that almost finished me. I can't even imagine being acutely ill for 6 months (I mean, I've been depressed for longer stretches than that, but somehow it's not quite the same).

    I know exactly what you mean. I remember pretty much nothing from my manic episodes. I suppose that's probably my brain doing me a favour, to be honest. :rolleyes:

    *hugs*
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by houseelf)
    Well, I suppose that's something. Still, I suppose the name they put on it is largely irrelevant to us; all we care about is trying to stay as sane as possible, right?

    It's certainly not pleasant. I spent the last 3/4 days in a pretty terrible dysphoric mania, and that almost finished me. I can't even imagine being acutely ill for 6 months (I mean, I've been depressed for longer stretches than that, but somehow it's not quite the same).

    I know exactly what you mean. I remember pretty much nothing from my manic episodes. I suppose that's probably my brain doing me a favour, to be honest. :rolleyes:

    *hugs*
    Well the fact that it's not as severe as schizophrenia means I feel able to trust my convictions a bit more than I might have done otherwise. Schizophrenia seems a much scarier label :o:

    That must have been horrible for you :console: Yeah, I think it's the brain's way of protecting us :yes: I told my therapist that I want to remember and she questioned whether it's important to remember and I guess for the most part it's not :nah:
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Well the fact that it's not as severe as schizophrenia means I feel able to trust my convictions a bit more than I might have done otherwise. Schizophrenia seems a much scarier label :o:

    That must have been horrible for you :console: Yeah, I think it's the brain's way of protecting us :yes: I told my therapist that I want to remember and she questioned whether it's important to remember and I guess for the most part it's not :nah:
    That's true. I know for at least a month after my bathroom splintered into a million shards of glass I had to check everything I was seeing with my girlfriend, "just to make sure". It's not cool doubting everything you perceive, amirite? :rolleyes:

    It's definitely the worst state I can end up in. Thankfully they don't last too long, though. I'm certainly feeling the effects now I'm back on the planet again; 3 hours of sleep in the last 96 takes its toll!

    I know I'd definitely rather forget some of the things I've done while manic.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Had depression/bipolar since i was 11, it made school difficult, i struggled though uni (though eventually graduated). I've lost friends, relationships and jobs because of it. It caused me to hurt myself. It's made me suicidal and i've nearly succeded in taking my own life several times. Its put stress and worry on my family. Its led to me currently being unable to work.

    In short its made life a lot more difficult than it ever needed to be.
    • PS Reviewer
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by houseelf)
    That's true. I know for at least a month after my bathroom splintered into a million shards of glass I had to check everything I was seeing with my girlfriend, "just to make sure". It's not cool doubting everything you perceive, amirite? :rolleyes:

    It's definitely the worst state I can end up in. Thankfully they don't last too long, though. I'm certainly feeling the effects now I'm back on the planet again; 3 hours of sleep in the last 96 takes its toll!

    I know I'd definitely rather forget some of the things I've done while manic.
    Woah, that's very little sleep :eek: I hope you manage to catch up on lots soon :hugs:


    (Original post by xXMessedUpXx)
    Had depression/bipolar since i was 11, it made school difficult, i struggled though uni (though eventually graduated). I've lost friends, relationships and jobs because of it. It caused me to hurt myself. It's made me suicidal and i've nearly succeded in taking my own life several times. Its put stress and worry on my family. Its led to me currently being unable to work.

    In short its made life a lot more difficult than it ever needed to be.
    :hugs:
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Woah, that's very little sleep :eek: I hope you manage to catch up on lots soon :hugs:




    :hugs:
    Haha, thanks! I think I'm going to celebrate Easter Sunday by sleeping straight through it!

    Hope you get through this episode sharpish! :hugs:
    • #52
    #52

    Depression here as well.

    It's affected me in the sense that I just can't seem to form connections with people, and have proper relationships because depression is kind of a barrier, and I block people from seeing that side of my life. I don't feel like anyone knows the real me - to be honest I'm actually ashamed of myself and everything that my life entails.

    I always feel on the outside. Even if I'm with a group of friends, everyone will be laughing and joking and it will make me all the more sad, because I feel like I can't attain that.

    My self esteem and confidence are quite bad. I thought it was improving, but recently it's gone down again.

    It's just annoying, because I keep trying to act proactively to sort my life out, and everything I try seems to fail. It's so tiresome. And when I'm back to square one, I think 'if it hasn't improved me for me now (after 8 or so years) will it ever?

    It's kind of awful that, judging by this thread, so many of us are unhappy. And there don't seem to be many easy solutions. Really happy for those people that have recovered and are happy now though
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by xXMessedUpXx)

    In short its made life a lot more difficult than it ever needed to be.
    So, so true. I really hope I can cope with it making uni harder than it ought to be as well..
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by houseelf)
    When I talked to the RAF recruitment office, they told me that they won't accept anyone who's had more than 2 distinct "phases" of self-harm. I didn't think that was very clear to be honest, but I knew I was well above that so didn't bother following it up. Anyway, I don't know if it's the same for the Army, but that may be of some help?
    Confusing... Does that mean that they won't accept someone who's self harmed more than once or someone who's self harmed then stopped then self harmed and stopped?

    I've been to my GP twice about it but I don't think they could class it as 2 distinct phases as the first was to talk and I was told to come back a few months later (which I did and I was better) so I think it'll be fine.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by converselove)
    Confusing... Does that mean that they won't accept someone who's self harmed more than once or someone who's self harmed then stopped then self harmed and stopped?

    I've been to my GP twice about it but I don't think they could class it as 2 distinct phases as the first was to talk and I was told to come back a few months later (which I did and I was better) so I think it'll be fine.
    I interpreted it as the latter; done it, stopped, then started again. But I honestly don't know for sure.

    Yeah, you should be alright. You may even find that your GP's willing to bend the facts slightly to help you - I know my Mental Health Worker encouraged me to still give it a go even though I've probably stopped and started at least 15 times. :rolleyes:
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Gosh, I'd forgotten about this thread.

    So far 10 weeks of psychotic episode and no sign of it ending anytime soon. My meds have been increased and I've been given a new diagnosis of nonspecific psychotic disorder. Nonspecific coz I'm that special and confusing. Urgh :sigh:
    May I ask what sort of symptoms you get with your psychosis and whether or not you are consciously aware of them being unusual or out of the ordinary when they occur?

    Sorry if I seem incredibly blunt by asking, it's rare that I come across other people with experience of psychosis thus I like to get their perspective on it, what it's like, how it impacts upon them, etc.

    You don't have to answer if you don't want to, or you could reply by PM. Either way it'd be nice to hear of your experiences and how you cope with them
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: September 4, 2011
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.