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    (Original post by Eloades11)
    Strange, we just covered these topics in first term. All I can remember from haematology is the cool word haematopoiesis. Immunology was definitely the worst module, expecting us to know everything about every cell, covering MHC molecules, T cell receptors, function of the spleen and dendritic cells, development of each immune cell, recombination genes involved in generating the hypervariable regions of immunoglobulins. I really need to revise this stuff soon.

    It all depends on your university course to be honest, it's likely that you'll cover completely different things, I'm in my second year doing a Biomedical Science degree.
    Is your course IBMS accredited? Don't all the IBMS/HPC (or whatever it is now lol) courses need to have certain core topics?

    All the past students have said immunology was a nightmare. We did some general immunology in our microbiology module like innate, adaptive, complement pathways, polymorphs etc. and it looked really boring. I really liked the HIV section though.

    Haematology sounds so boring though. Like I can just imagine having to learn all the cells and what they differentiate into bleh

    This year is really biochem orientated for us then next year we go straight into the molecular bio. I hate molecular biology although it's probably the best thing for jobs right now.

    Btw, in general, how does everyone find their labs? Our's are so boring. Spec, calibration curve, THE UNKNOWN IS THIS! = our labs atm.
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    (Original post by Yawn11)
    7th, 8th, 9th & 16th of January... My exam dates.

    Introduction to pharmacology, Concept in Human Genetics, Advanced Physiology and Biology of disease.

    God help me.
    Haaaaaaaaaa you need to do pharmacology
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    I am having difficulty understanding certain concepts of how changes in membrane potential can be used to study changes in permeability. For example if the membrane is hyperpolarised, there is little current flow. Is this because as the membrane hyperpolarises (more negative), Vm moves towards the Ek. Therefore is little/no net movement of K+ outside.

    Also during resting membrane potential is further K+ restricted from moving out because of a small driving force, therefore at -65mV K+ is already near its most energetically favourable state, so there is less driving force acting on K+ , therefore less will move out?
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    (Original post by blah_blah2345)
    I am having difficulty understanding certain concepts of how changes in membrane potential can be used to study changes in permeability. For example if the membrane is hyperpolarised, there is little current flow. Is this because as the membrane hyperpolarises (more negative), Vm moves towards the Ek. Therefore is little/no net movement of K+ outside.

    Yes as the membrane hyperpolarises it moves towards Ek but this does mean there is definitely current flow in respect to potassium. This also means that the membrane is permeable to potassium as it allows potassium movement due to voltage gated potassium channels

    Also during resting membrane potential is further K+ restricted from moving out because of a small driving force, therefore at -65mV K+ is already near its most energetically favourable state, so there is less driving force acting on K+ , therefore less will move out?
    Sounds right. The resting membrane potential is affected by the different ions (eg. calcium, sodium and hydrogen carbonate) and they balance out to about -65mV depending on the cell type
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    (Original post by Gucci Mane2010)
    Sounds right. The resting membrane potential is affected by the different ions (eg. calcium, sodium and hydrogen carbonate) and they balance out to about -65mV depending on the cell type
    Thank you very much for your reply. I understand what you are saying. But say if hyperpolarisation occured straight after resting membrane potential ( so in this case no depolarisation occurs). As a result of no depolarisation occuring K voltage channels do not open. So then hyperpolarisation would produce a capcitive current but little current flow. My question (my apologies I should have made it more clear) is that as Vm is already close to Ek, there is little ''ambition'' or driving force for K to move out of the cell, thus explaining why there is little current flow? Is this true or am I just making stuff up?
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    (Original post by blah_blah2345)
    Thank you very much for your reply. I understand what you are saying. But say if hyperpolarisation occured straight after resting membrane potential ( so in this case no depolarisation occurs). As a result of no depolarisation occuring K voltage channels do not open. So then hyperpolarisation would produce a capcitive current but little current flow. My question (my apologies I should have made it more clear) is that as Vm is already close to Ek, there is little ''ambition'' or driving force for K to move out of the cell, thus explaining why there is little current flow? Is this true or am I just making stuff up?
    What causes the hyperpolarisation? A diffusion gradient tries to pull K+ out of the cell whereas an electric gradient tries to pull K+ into the cell. These opposing forces balance at resting membrane potential. However, some K+ channels (not voltage gated ones) are open and allow K+ to leave the cell by diffusion. As the opposing forces are balanced out at this stage the driving force for K+ is not there so that could be the reason for little current flow.

    This is a very helpful tutorial that will help you visualise the process:
    http://www.sumanasinc.com/webcontent...signaling.html
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    Hello
    I am a recent BSc (Hons) Biomedical Sciences graduate ( the IBMSaccredited course with no integrated year placement)
    Does it mean that in order to become HCPC registered I have to complete a registration portfolio first?
    honestly with no trainee post available on the nhs website it seems impossible

    any advice? I really want to work in the hospital lab

    thank you for any info
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    Hey everyone! To all the 2nd and 3rd year students, is there anything you wish you knew when you was in your first year?
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    (Original post by Waqar.)
    Hey everyone! To all the 2nd and 3rd year students, is there anything you wish you knew when you was in your first year?
    Not to rely on exams to pull your grades up. Score high in assignments and practicals as its easier to get better marks in those
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    (Original post by Gucci Mane2010)
    Not to rely on exams to pull your grades up. Score high in assignments and practicals as its easier to get better marks in those
    Thanks, I'll definitely bear that in mind
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    (Original post by Waqar.)
    Hey everyone! To all the 2nd and 3rd year students, is there anything you wish you knew when you was in your first year?
    remember to study regularly, even small amounts but every day, it all counts later on as you remember things; and as said before do your best in small assingments/practicals- is all counts later on
    I would also advice to join the IBMS Society (if you havent already done so), as a Associate(student), it is free for students at the beginning. that all counts later on for your CV

    good luck; it's getting more interesting (and challanging!) with each year
    :-)
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    (Original post by [email protected])
    remember to study regularly, even small amounts but every day, it all counts later on as you remember things; and as said before do your best in small assingments/practicals- is all counts later on
    I would also advice to join the IBMS Society (if you havent already done so), as a Associate(student), it is free for students at the beginning. that all counts later on for your CV

    good luck; it's getting more interesting (and challanging!) with each year
    :-)
    Thanks! I'll look into joining the IBMS society
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    Hey

    I was interested in doing a sandwich placement for 2013/2014. Just wondering does anyone one know how to apply?
    Do the vacancies come up on the NHS site? or do I contact each hospital separatly?

    Thank you
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    I actually need help so i would like it if someone gave me quick and helpful advice. i've recently decided i want to do medicine but i have already picked up my a levels and im in A2. My subjects are medical science level 3 BTEC and health and social care. Also English a level. However i do not have maths GCSE , and i want to do bio medical science for three years then do medicine or do a foundation course in bio medical science ? do you think i should do not medicine or carry on routing for my dream? please reply ! i need urgent help thank you.
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    (Original post by Laila1234)
    I actually need help so i would like it if someone gave me quick and helpful advice. i've recently decided i want to do medicine but i have already picked up my a levels and im in A2. My subjects are medical science level 3 BTEC and health and social care. Also English a level. However i do not have maths GCSE , and i want to do bio medical science for three years then do medicine or do a foundation course in bio medical science ? do you think i should do not medicine or carry on routing for my dream? please reply ! i need urgent help thank you.
    Foundation course can be done for biomedical. There are many universities that offer this option. However, you will need maths GCSE at minimum grade C for most entry requirements. Will the maths GCSE be a retake? If so try and join lessons in school or college. Don't give up on a dream. Nothing is impossible if you work hard at it!
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    (Original post by cyn_purple)
    Foundation course can be done for biomedical. There are many universities that offer this option. However, you will need maths GCSE at minimum grade C for most entry requirements. Will the maths GCSE be a retake? If so try and join lessons in school or college. Don't give up on a dream. Nothing is impossible if you work hard at it!
    Even for the foundation course i need maths gcse ? cant i do it while doing the foundation course..
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    Seriously underestimated how hard a Biomedical Science course would be...
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    (Original post by Laila1234)
    Even for the foundation course i need maths gcse ? cant i do it while doing the foundation course..
    Yes you will need maths GCSE at a C for most university courses. Biomedical science also has calculations as well.
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    (Original post by YB101)
    Seriously underestimated how hard a Biomedical Science course would be...
    Same, the entry requirements were very deceiving. I found it much harder than I expected it to be but you do adjust.
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    (Original post by Gucci Mane2010)
    Same, the entry requirements were very deceiving. I found it much harder than I expected it to be but you do adjust.
    I agree as well. I get 4 assignments to do every week at least.
 
 
 
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