Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Flicker)
    The band is your level, they are consistent across the NHS to see what pays cake you are on.

    You qualify as a band 5 (SLT). You move up to band 6 (specialist SLT) band 7 (highly specialist SLT) and band 8 (clinical lead). At each move higher you will become more specialist in the client group you choose to work with eg mainstream, ASD, neuro acquired disorders etc. And also take on more supervision roles. Band 8s do little clinical work, they are the service managers.

    Assistants are band 3 or 4 and support the slts in day to day running - carrying out planned programs of therapy, supporting groups, admin tasks etc. They are not trained SLTs.

    X


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Thanks for your help! Does your band number increase based on the number of years of experience? are there a specific number of years you must complete before moving to the next band number? Or is it based on going back to school and getting a specialization in a certain area and your band number increases.
    I went on the NHS website and they also have a points system for each band number... what do the points mean? This is the link I found it on

    http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/working...nge-pay-rates/
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by wbluestar)
    Thanks for your help! Does your band number increase based on the number of years of experience? are there a specific number of years you must complete before moving to the next band number? Or is it based on going back to school and getting a specialization in a certain area and your band number increases.
    I went on the NHS website and they also have a points system for each band number... what do the points mean? This is the link I found it on

    http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/working...nge-pay-rates/
    You can apply for higher band positions when you have appropriate experience, yes. You would apply for a vacancy at that level, it wouldn't normally automatically increase.

    The points system however does, you increase by increments annually to reward experience and you would also go up as your skills increase eg you get your competencies signed off. So your first job is bottom of band 5 but if you then applied for another band 5 job when you had completed your competencies and had more experience you might negotiate not going in at the bottom of the band.

    Think the NHS are getting rid of the points system though so it may not be around much longer...


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Flicker)
    You can apply for higher band positions when you have appropriate experience, yes. You would apply for a vacancy at that level, it wouldn't normally automatically increase.

    The points system however does, you increase by increments annually to reward experience and you would also go up as your skills increase eg you get your competencies signed off. So your first job is bottom of band 5 but if you then applied for another band 5 job when you had completed your competencies and had more experience you might negotiate not going in at the bottom of the band.

    Think the NHS are getting rid of the points system though so it may not be around much longer...


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    That makes sense!! Do you know how the job market is in London for speech therapists? I would like to work abit there after completing my degree if there are good job prospects. Thank you again for your help This is probz dumb question loll but what are competencies?! Do you mean finishing off your masters?
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by wbluestar)
    That makes sense!! Do you know how the job market is in London for speech therapists? I would like to work abit there after completing my degree if there are good job prospects. Thank you again for your help This is probz dumb question loll but what are competencies?! Do you mean finishing off your masters?
    When you qualify you are a 'newly qualified practitioner' and there are a list of skills you must demonstrate. Those are your competencies... You collect evidence and get your manager to sign off. You can see about them on the RCSLT website.

    Lots of jobs in London I think. I qualified last year, I would say 75% of my cohort are working in London? There's big London trusts and also lots of private practices too.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hey guys, I don't want to flood this thread with questions but this seems the only place I can ask this. I want to do an undergraduate degree in modern languages travel, work abroad etc then get some work experience relevant to SALT and do a Msc. Would doing a degree that is not psychology, linguistics etc make me unable to go down this route.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hey guys, I'm just finishing up my undergrad in psychology and sociology in limerick. I've applied for Sheffield and completed the interview and got placed on the waiting list. Just wondering if anyone else was on the waiting list and do you know when u find out I'd you've got a place? Or if anyone is in the course that might know what the chances are I getting a place if you are on the waiting list? So frustrating not knowing! :/
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JamesJones777)
    Hey guys, I don't want to flood this thread with questions but this seems the only place I can ask this. I want to do an undergraduate degree in modern languages travel, work abroad etc then get some work experience relevant to SALT and do a Msc. Would doing a degree that is not psychology, linguistics etc make me unable to go down this route.
    Most of the postgraduate programmes consider applicants with a bachelor's in any field. I think Reading is the only programme that explicitly states that it requires applicants to have a related degree (i.e. linguistics, psychology, medical science, education etc.). That said, though modern languages isn't strictly related to SLT, you'll still probably pick up a lot of relevant skills and knowledge that you can identify and discuss in your personal statement. The route you're considering is definitely not closed off to you!

    Since your ultimate goal is a career in SLT, have you considered going straight for an undergrad programme instead? They are markedly less intensive than the postgraduate programmes and generally easier to get a place on as there are more of them. It would also save you £9,000 a year on an MFL undergrad that isn't necessary to get to where you want to go in the end (nor is it even needed to travel or work abroad). Just a suggestion as I wish I'd known I wanted to go into SLT before I did my undergrad so I could skip all the kerfuffle in between
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by smileyx123x)
    Ahh okay! I'm still thinking about it, but it looks like I might have to turn it down.. but Reading is a great Uni! i'm quite an indecisive person !
    Haha i got so excited when I saw the email, then was a bit disappointed I don't no not for this year's intake, going to re-apply, but also kinda want to look into studying abroad also maybe the states... have you got any other offers?
    X
    Yeah Reading is, I only applied to Reading and Essex because I ran out of time for the others and didn't have enough experience for UCL. I've got an interview with Essex on May 6th :/ so not long to go, bit worried!

    Yeah I was considering that also, I'm not sure how expensive it is though? What have you found out about it so far?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Che567)
    Yeah Reading is, I only applied to Reading and Essex because I ran out of time for the others and didn't have enough experience for UCL. I've got an interview with Essex on May 6th :/ so not long to go, bit worried!

    Yeah I was considering that also, I'm not sure how expensive it is though? What have you found out about it so far?

    Jumping in here, but I've got an interview with Essex on May 6th, too! Nerves are starting to wrack up now, for sure. Driving up to Essex from home tomorrow. Wonder how many of us there'll be.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kmlj)
    Jumping in here, but I've got an interview with Essex on May 6th, too! Nerves are starting to wrack up now, for sure. Driving up to Essex from home tomorrow. Wonder how many of us there'll be.
    I was at the interview yesterday too! How did you find it? x
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Che567)
    Yeah Reading is, I only applied to Reading and Essex because I ran out of time for the others and didn't have enough experience for UCL. I've got an interview with Essex on May 6th :/ so not long to go, bit worried!

    Yeah I was considering that also, I'm not sure how expensive it is though? What have you found out about it so far?
    How did your interview go?! I hope it went well for you
    Keep your options open always! The states offer great courses and for 2 years, with some schools offering scholarships (but most require specific criteria to apply for). A lot of them i've seen offer ones especially to asian/hispanic/or people from very low income backgrounds But without the scholarships it's quite expensive, espec if you go to NYC or a large city school, but great teaching/research facilities and job opportunities to stay after
    X
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone! I'm usually on the Undergrad Speech 2014 board but thought you guys may be interested in this too:

    hi - just found out via my sister that FUTURELEARN are doing a FREE online dysphagia course - always good to have taken part in, you sign up to future learn and have to commit weekly to it, but I've done a few courses before on it and are very good. This one is by the UEA:

    https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/swallowing-difficulties-and-medicines

    It starts on the 9th of June for 8 weeks, recommends 3 hrs p/w on it - but you can sign up for it now!

    They also do other courses including a 'getting ready for uni' one for you guys who haven't been before - I'm doing it as a refresher as have been out of school for a while now! But there's loads on there.... and no I'm not on commission or anything, just found it to be quite interesting - there's a course on managing your personal finances I'm doing too... lol...


    So Dysphagia free online course by UEA, 9th June, 8 weeks, good to know a bit before we start! See you on there if you decide to do it!

    ------------------------------------

    Good luck with all of your interviews, applications and courses!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gemz475)
    I also got an offer from Reading for Language Sciences.I was lucky enough to be accepted by UCL but I did look at what Reading were offering out of curiosity. I agree that it's very expensive for the year and there's no guarantee of a place on a course in future years. I would think it would be better to use the year to gain more experience?
    Hi I'm hoping to apply to UCL next year, I'm finishing my undergrad in psychology and sociology and am going to take a year out to get more experience. I was just wondering if you could give me any advice on what kind of experience I should get to be accepted onto the course in UCL? And do you know what level of degree is recommended to be offered a place (like 2:2, 2:1 or a 1:1) ? Thanks!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kmlj)
    Jumping in here, but I've got an interview with Essex on May 6th, too! Nerves are starting to wrack up now, for sure. Driving up to Essex from home tomorrow. Wonder how many of us there'll be.
    Haha strange, who were you I probably met you and didn't even know!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by smileyx123x)
    How did your interview go?! I hope it went well for you
    Keep your options open always! The states offer great courses and for 2 years, with some schools offering scholarships (but most require specific criteria to apply for). A lot of them i've seen offer ones especially to asian/hispanic/or people from very low income backgrounds But without the scholarships it's quite expensive, espec if you go to NYC or a large city school, but great teaching/research facilities and job opportunities to stay after
    X
    Hey,

    Yeah I felt it went well but then I think they interviewed 120 people for 30m places and only 25 are funded, so there is a lot of competition. Yeah I had a look into it but money is the issue. So who knows. I want the applications for 2015 to open already haha
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JessMMcG)
    Hi I'm hoping to apply to UCL next year, I'm finishing my undergrad in psychology and sociology and am going to take a year out to get more experience. I was just wondering if you could give me any advice on what kind of experience I should get to be accepted onto the course in UCL? And do you know what level of degree is recommended to be offered a place (like 2:2, 2:1 or a 1:1) ? Thanks!
    Hi JessMMcG,

    I studied Psychology at National University of Ireland, Maynooth achieved a 2:1, and then took a year out to gain SLT experience with as many different populations as possible before applying for masters. I was lucky enough to gain places at several universities this year including UCL. My decision eventually came down between UL and UCL. I chose Limerick in the end because of it's great reputation and the included Dysphagia qualification. UCL is a fantastic university and their staff is really lovely, a special shout out to Anna who is one of the most supportive individuals I have ever has the pleasure of encountering.

    Are you considering UL? Or do you want a change of universities from where you're doing your undergrad?

    In terms of UCL's expected grade they state a requirement of a 2.2 and above but from what I've seen in order to gain admission with a 2.2 you must have extensive experience and excellent references. In some other unis a 2.1 is necessary.

    I had work as an unpaid SLTA, volunteered in care of the elderly facilities, working with stroke patient and individuals with dementia working alongside SLTs. I also attended many courses and training days, including a 4 day workshop with the McGuire Progamme to gain experience with individuals challenged by stammer. I also spent time volunteering as an SNA in a mainstream school to observe typically developing children. It all adds up.

    As you're based in Limerick, I advise talking to the Clinical Therapies dept and asking if there are any opportunities to observe clinics. Meeting with staff and therapists there will provide you with lots of information. You should get in touch with Jonathon Linklater. He's completing his PhD at UL and is the current head of the IASLT and runs Stammering Awareness Day. He'd be happy to let you know of volunteering opportunities that you could of avail of. One day here and there is very valuable.

    Sorry for the super long post and I hope I haven't rambled too much or forgotten anything. Feel free to message me if you have any questions that you think I might be able to help with.

    Best of luck with your finals and your applications.

    Dani xx
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by YoungJade)
    I was at the interview yesterday too! How did you find it? x
    I felt good about it, honestly! I think most of us did, it was a really chilled atmosphere. But there are so many of us and it's so competitive, so it's hard to say! How did you find it? I think I actually met you walking in there.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Che567)
    Haha strange, who were you I probably met you and didn't even know!
    Haha, probably! I'm Kez. I was the girl who'd driven up from Swansea the day before.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kmlj)
    Haha, probably! I'm Kez. I was the girl who'd driven up from Swansea the day before.
    I remember you I think you're the girl I walked in with haha! Glad you found it ok. Just a case of waiting now I guess :/
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by DANI_F)
    Hi JessMMcG,

    I studied Psychology at National University of Ireland, Maynooth achieved a 2:1, and then took a year out to gain SLT experience with as many different populations as possible before applying for masters. I was lucky enough to gain places at several universities this year including UCL. My decision eventually came down between UL and UCL. I chose Limerick in the end because of it's great reputation and the included Dysphagia qualification. UCL is a fantastic university and their staff is really lovely, a special shout out to Anna who is one of the most supportive individuals I have ever has the pleasure of encountering.

    Are you considering UL? Or do you want a change of universities from where you're doing your undergrad?

    In terms of UCL's expected grade they state a requirement of a 2.2 and above but from what I've seen in order to gain admission with a 2.2 you must have extensive experience and excellent references. In some other unis a 2.1 is necessary.

    I had work as an unpaid SLTA, volunteered in care of the elderly facilities, working with stroke patient and individuals with dementia working alongside SLTs. I also attended many courses and training days, including a 4 day workshop with the McGuire Progamme to gain experience with individuals challenged by stammer. I also spent time volunteering as an SNA in a mainstream school to observe typically developing children. It all adds up.

    As you're based in Limerick, I advise talking to the Clinical Therapies dept and asking if there are any opportunities to observe clinics. Meeting with staff and therapists there will provide you with lots of information. You should get in touch with Jonathon Linklater. He's completing his PhD at UL and is the current head of the IASLT and runs Stammering Awareness Day. He'd be happy to let you know of volunteering opportunities that you could of avail of. One day here and there is very valuable.

    Sorry for the super long post and I hope I haven't rambled too much or forgotten anything. Feel free to message me if you have any questions that you think I might be able to help with.

    Best of luck with your finals and your applications.

    Dani xx
    Thanks so much for getting back to me Dani, really appreciate your advice. I'm currently applying for everything and anything to get as much experience as I can in before applications start in November. I did an interview for Sheffield in January and got onto the waiting list but it's so competitive so I'm just going to presume I didn't get in and focus on applying for all the other colleges for next year.

    I will definitely apply to UL but I was thinking financially it might work out better if I get a funded course in England cos it's something like €9,000 in UL plus I'd have to pay for accommodation. And I would also like a change of scenery I think!

    Do you reckon that UCL would have the best reputation for SLT

    I will definitely get on to them in UL about experience and volunteering.

    Thanks again for all your help!!

    Jess
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.