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    (Original post by actrice)
    I am so worried about the Ovid translation - it seemed so weirdly easy that I think the board will be really nitpicky about small thing. I know I made a bunch of small mistakes, like making longi agree with sono (I didn't think it could agree with Hellesponti because I didn't see how a country could be 'long' and also didn't know the vocab "infestas".

    I had no idea at all how to handle "quo vectus erat" - how did everyone else translate that? The translation I found online suggests it is the donkey "which he had ridden" (which he had been carried by, so, which he rode) but I'm hoping that if everyone found that bit really tricky it won't be so terrible that I was completely stumped by it..

    If anyone wants to check their work you can just google Ovid Fasti book 6 and find a translation online - so you can see how you did I found it quite reassuring to read a translation online after the exam was over, so I know I got the gist of it basically correct.

    As for amount, I filled up 3 answer booklets.... I'm not sure how much that is. I think the regular answer booklets are 5 sides and the supplement ones are 4 sides, so maybe 13 pages? That includes a LOT of scribbling out though... What about y'all?
    For quo vectus erat, I think I translated it as 'on which he had travelled'. I think I messed up the last line unfortunately - I said Vesta had escaped his hands :/ I also think I may have taken a few too many liberties when I tried to make the English fluent. Oh well, can't do anything about it now!

    I answered the questions backwards and I more or less filled the answer booklet (bar a page or two) with the essays. I then answered the Ovid on a supplement booklet. I thought the regular answer booklets were longer though - about 10 or 11 pages - so I'm a little worried I've filled in the wrong answer booklet!
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    Candycake: yeah I definitely got that part badly wrong - I learned veho as "carry, bear, convey" so I think I put "to where he had been carried"...

    I'm sure you're fine with the answer booklets - you're probably right. I tend to be somewhat "prolific" in exams so it's totally plausible I wrote 18 pages. I wrote 20 in some of my exams last year that were shorter... I think I panic and my brain goes into some kind of hyper-speed-writing-as-proxy-for-swiftly-fleeing mode.

    They will probably give you some credit for the Vesta fleeing his hands thing - you clearly know that someone is fleeing and manus can mean hands, and just got the subject wrong. So I wouldn't worry about that too much. It might be completely the wrong translation but you'll probably still get most of the marks for it.

    I'm worrying about all the silliest things - I didn't have time to check my translation and am concerned that I missed out a word. I also have a tendency to unthinkingly substitute words that start with the same letter when I'm panicked, like writing hair when I mean herd, or something - like handwriting typos. I am terrified I wrote about Venus and Proprius rather than Vesta and Priapus...
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    I feel quite lucky that my teacher happened to mention a few weeks ago that 'veho' in the passive can mean 'to ride'!

    I certainly took some rather extensive liberties with the English, but literal translation is always going to fail at some point. The poet in me overcame the grammarian...
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    (Original post by GraingerTown)
    I feel quite lucky that my teacher happened to mention a few weeks ago that 'veho' in the passive can mean 'to ride'!

    I certainly took some rather extensive liberties with the English, but literal translation is always going to fail at some point. The poet in me overcame the grammarian...
    Wow, that is lucky! I was just kicking myself in the exam because I could remember there were two meanings for veho, but couldn't remember which the one apart from 'carry' was...oh well, it's over now!

    Just so glad Ovid was nowhere near as difficult as I was expecting, and that Virgil was quite predictable too. Just Livy and Pliny now!
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    How did people do the second Catullus 25 marker?
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    Is anyone doing the prose composition in Friday's paper?
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    (Original post by candycake)
    Is anyone doing the prose composition in Friday's paper?
    No...not brave enough!:) Are you?
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    (Original post by zitarose)
    No...not brave enough! Are you?
    Yes - I was just wondering how everyone was learning vocab. The Livy just looks so difficult - at least with prose comp if you don't know the exact vocab you can find a way around it!
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    (Original post by candycake)
    Yes - I was just wondering how everyone was learning vocab. The Livy just looks so difficult - at least with prose comp if you don't know the exact vocab you can find a way around it!
    I have attempted to learn every word I don't know as I come across it...which I've sometimes kept on top of and sometimes haven't! :/

    So I've also used this vocab list as a back-up (it's the one AQA used to provide):
    http://www.cambridgescp.com/downloads/aqa2.pdf

    I've also used this one, since I was worried that there seemed to be far too many easy words on the AQA list:
    http://vle.worth.org.uk/classics/doc...vocabulary.pdf

    This looks good too, though I haven't used it:
    http://www.memrise.com/course/80832/...id-vocabulary/
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    (Original post by Megh01)
    How did people do the second Catullus 25 marker?
    Mostly disagreed, but gave a case for his more light-hearted poems.
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    (Original post by zitarose)
    I have attempted to learn every word I don't know as I come across it...which I've sometimes kept on top of and sometimes haven't! :/

    So I've also used this vocab list as a back-up (it's the one AQA used to provide):
    http://www.cambridgescp.com/downloads/aqa2.pdf

    I've also used this one, since I was worried that there seemed to be far too many easy words on the AQA list:
    http://vle.worth.org.uk/classics/doc...vocabulary.pdf

    This looks good too, though I haven't used it:
    http://www.memrise.com/course/80832/...id-vocabulary/
    Thank you so much! I've got some major cramming to do now though
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    Which prose author is everyone doing by the way? I'm studying Tacitus - anyone have any predictions on what may come up?
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    (Original post by candycake)
    Thank you so much! I've got some major cramming to do now though
    Me too! And I'm working all evening now :/

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by candycake)
    Don't worry, I never have time for a conclusion. I only just scraped enough time to write about Augustus and the future of Rome - added them in in the very last five minutes! It was quite an open question and there was so much that could be included - just hope I've covered enough topics. I mainly covered Marcellus, Dido, Tartarus, the river, the entrance to Hades, Elysian Fields, Augustus and Brutus a little. I was hoping for an extract question from the first half but that section was ok - it was quite nice to be able to write a commentary for the similes.
    Thats okay then! You deaf sound like you've covered enough, well done!
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    (Original post by Juan Baya)
    Mostly disagreed, but gave a case for his more light-hearted poems.
    was this the question - 'catullus' Poems are as much about joy and happiness as they are about sadness and tears' to what extent do you agree? - I said I agree as there are happy poems (e.g. licinius, sirmio, travel poem) and sad poems as well (lesbian, brother) is that right? because after the exam I was thinking did they mean that each poem is both happy and sad? And also we didn't need latin quotes for that one did we?
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    (Original post by candycake)
    Which prose author is everyone doing by the way? I'm studying Tacitus - anyone have any predictions on what may come up?
    Im doing tacitus too, awful isn't it! The Themes i have (of which i feel confident on none..) are:
    Motivation and Ambition,
    Deception and Dissimulation
    Character of Sejanus
    Character of Tiberius
    Character of Agrippina
    Emperor, Senate and Res Publica
    Tacitus' Historical Technique
    Forward Planning vs Opportunism

    I hate the Tacitus set text, they style is really hard to spot and its just not easy to follow (everyone being called the same thing the whole time)

    Oh well!
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    (Original post by sargentsargent2)
    Im doing tacitus too, awful isn't it! The Themes i have (of which i feel confident on none..) are:
    Motivation and Ambition,
    Deception and Dissimulation
    Character of Sejanus
    Character of Tiberius
    Character of Agrippina
    Emperor, Senate and Res Publica
    Tacitus' Historical Technique
    Forward Planning vs Opportunism

    I hate the Tacitus set text, they style is really hard to spot and its just not easy to follow (everyone being called the same thing the whole time)

    Oh well!
    Wow, you seem really prepared! I don't have any themic notes although my teacher has given us a tonne on style which I'm desperately trying (and failing!) to learn. It's only two commentaries for this paper, right? I would do terribly if we had to write a synoptic essay! I definitely struggle to identify which chapter the extract is from - so much vocab is repeated and the chapters all look so similar. I'm hoping an extract might be taken from one of the letters - I think there's more style to comment on compared to elsewhere in the text.
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    (Original post by Megh01)
    was this the question - 'catullus' Poems are as much about joy and happiness as they are about sadness and tears' to what extent do you agree? - I said I agree as there are happy poems (e.g. licinius, sirmio, travel poem) and sad poems as well (lesbian, brother) is that right? because after the exam I was thinking did they mean that each poem is both happy and sad? And also we didn't need latin quotes for that one did we?
    Yes, that's the one. That's pretty much what I did - obviously the given one (Sirmio) is one of joy, so I discussed that in some detail using quotes from that passage and explaining a little bit, but that may have been a waste of time since that wasn't the main focus of the question. From there, I made a case mainly for "It's not all despair and sadness", talked about Acme and Septimius and how that is a positive portrayal of love, mentioned his "glad feet" and general traveller's spirit in his main travel poem. Then presented the other side, which I then agreed with in my conclusion, that his poetry treats more frequently the negative themes, giving examples there, then rounded it off in that way.

    I'm pretty sure that would be what they would look for, I doubt I'll get very high marks since I wasn't entirely happy with it, I felt the commentary question was much better and easier, but I don't see how it could be a question of examining individual poems in terms of their positive/negative balance, since generally (with the exception perhaps of the Licinius poem, where he begins fairly positive then turns it into a discussion of his subsequent grief) each poem is either 'happy' or 'sad'.

    And no, don't think Latin quotes are needed, it'd be very harsh for them to expect that; I think evidence that you know of works other than the one given and that you know their content in reasonable detail would what is required.
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    (Original post by candycake)
    Wow, you seem really prepared! I don't have any themic notes although my teacher has given us a tonne on style which I'm desperately trying (and failing!) to learn. It's only two commentaries for this paper, right? I would do terribly if we had to write a synoptic essay! I definitely struggle to identify which chapter the extract is from - so much vocab is repeated and the chapters all look so similar. I'm hoping an extract might be taken from one of the letters - I think there's more style to comment on compared to elsewhere in the text.
    Is it just 2 commentaries?! I really hope so! I think your right.. Thank god no essay on Tacitus, its all the same all the way through! Im just trying to learn style, not going well though, was so much easier for the Verse! Yes, the letters are good, as it shows people lying and references other things, also I feel like 1-3 have more style than most of the other passages too.
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    (Original post by Juan Baya)
    Yes, that's the one. That's pretty much what I did - obviously the given one (Sirmio) is one of joy, so I discussed that in some detail using quotes from that passage and explaining a little bit, but that may have been a waste of time since that wasn't the main focus of the question. From there, I made a case mainly for "It's not all despair and sadness", talked about Acme and Septimius and how that is a positive portrayal of love, mentioned his "glad feet" and general traveller's spirit in his main travel poem. Then presented the other side, which I then agreed with in my conclusion, that his poetry treats more frequently the negative themes, giving examples there, then rounded it off in that way.

    I'm pretty sure that would be what they would look for, I doubt I'll get very high marks since I wasn't entirely happy with it, I felt the commentary question was much better and easier, but I don't see how it could be a question of examining individual poems in terms of their positive/negative balance, since generally (with the exception perhaps of the Licinius poem, where he begins fairly positive then turns it into a discussion of his subsequent grief) each poem is either 'happy' or 'sad'.

    And no, don't think Latin quotes are needed, it'd be very harsh for them to expect that; I think evidence that you know of works other than the one given and that you know their content in reasonable detail would what is required.
    yeah I forgot to mention acme and Septimius and poem 64 messed up that question majorly :') oh well
 
 
 
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