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    (Original post by Crystal4)
    Yep chemistry A I'm really feeling down rn. I was predicted an A and got an E. Hoping to retake unit 2 and get 90%+ in it.
    I was predicted a B and got an E. :/ I'm actually putting work in this year though and hope I can get at least a C at the end- I'm resitting too.
    I reckon if you put the work in and you really want it, there's nothing stopping you from getting the grade you need.

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    Doing OCR A2 Chem aswell here, but actually beat my prediction of a B for AS and managed to scrape an A despite those horrific papers. A boy in my school went from D->A last year and in economics there was a boy who went from D->A*. If you really set ur mind to it, its do-able.
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    Hey, is it possible to bring up a C to an A in Biology without resitting?
    I actually got CDDD for the first time I took AS. Then I retook the papers and got AAC. I don't want to resit again, that's just crazy.
    A2 starts in two weeks. \:
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    No we asked but not possible to go from c to a


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    (Original post by Fintastic)
    Hey, is it possible to bring up a C to an A in Biology without resitting?
    I actually got CDDD for the first time I took AS. Then I retook the papers and got AAC. I don't want to resit again, that's just crazy.
    A2 starts in two weeks. \:

    Yes if lets say u got 65% at as you would need 95% at a2 to make it into 80% which will make it into an a*. You cant get an A with a C but you can get an A*. Unless u retake some modules.
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    (Original post by rakib567)
    Yes if lets say u got 65% at as you would need 95% at a2 to make it into 80% which will make it into an a*. You cant get an A with a C but you can get an A*. Unless u retake some modules.
    I'm doing CIE, so if I want to retake, I have to retake all the papers, unfortunately.

    Do you mean I can get an A but not an A*? Kinda confused, sorry. However, my percentile really is 65%. Spot on.
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    (Original post by Fintastic)
    I'm doing CIE, so if I want to retake, I have to retake all the papers, unfortunately.

    Do you mean I can get an A but not an A*? Kinda confused, sorry. However, my percentile really is 65%. Spot on.

    If u get 80% overall with 90% at a2 u fet an a*. Considering that u beed over 90% ar a2 anyway u would achieve an a*. If u retake and get 85% as and 75% a2 then u get an A becayse u dont have 90% at a2. I dont know About CIE but i am retaking as bio abd chem alongside a2
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    I'm going to retake my English language to get a B overall, as the majority of universities want a B in English and Maths GCSE for the course that I am applying for. The exam officer then went on to say how even getting the B in English won't increase my chances in getting an offer at university! With the course that I want to apply for at least ABB-AAB. Then he went on to say how unis won't give me an offer because of my AS grades (BBBC). I was so upset but I am glad that my head of sixth form was there to witness this. Apparently I should only apply to universities that want applicants to have BBB-CCC.


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    Hey everyone,

    I remember reading these when I was in some of your positions and now I'm pleased that I can not only be one of the success stories, but hopefully motivate everyone.

    At AS, I got CEE in Geography, Economics and Philosophy and I managed to pull these grades up to AAB and hold an unconditional confirmed place starting next year!

    It is therefore definitely possible for anybody, especially given that my AS results were a wake up call, as I have been notoriously lazy, so for anybody willing to work hard, it is certainly possible. I'd suggest working smartly rather than hard. By this, I mean don't overdo it. I completely burned out during my exams and I panicked as a result and was finding it hard to revise.

    Revision tips

    You've probably heard them all before, but I finally took the advice and it paid off in the end.

    - Identify what type of learner you are - it will be counterproductive making revision cards if you're not suited to this type of revision.

    - Keep it simple - I burned out because I overcomplicated it and got muddled. Some people can just listen to recordings of themselves reading notes, while others like to draw mind maps and paragraphs. I personally thought I learn best by revision cards and mind maps, but I spent too much time making it look pretty and not getting anything out of it. My revision in the end, consisted of typed up notes, which I would scribble down from memory and then would write them down again really randomly, as well as past papers, examiner's reports and mark schemes. It didn't look pretty by the end, but it scruffy writing on lined pads seemed to work in the end. I'd therefore sample some revision methods now.

    - Ask questions where you're not sure. I think my teachers are sick of me now exams are over, but it was useful because some things you don't understand might just be your grade changing questions. They may also have sample answers and other useful resources. They can also mark your papers harshly and identify where you need to improve. If you're in the position of self-teaching or teachers you don't like, start or find a thread on student room and discuss it with people and also help them out - it really helps.

    - Don't just do past papers - read examiner's reports. They are essentially a guide to what the examiner wants and there's no point doing past papers and continuously making mark-costing errors. You'll notice in examiner's reports whiny comments, saying 'Students continuously make this error' - don't be that person. I found it useful highlighting and making my own aims and comments aside these. Additionally, the examining boards are likely to test on where students keep making errors, so it helps you prepare more for exams when doing last minute revision. I accurately predicted most of the questions, but don't swear by this, as they might throw a spanner in the works. Reports are probably why I went from an E on a couple of papers to A*s.

    - Focus on what you don't understand - going over something you know inside out will not gain you anymore marks. Sort out what you don't know and you will gain marks.

    - Learn mark schemes - you'll know how to structure and will be able to identify themes and patterns. I also wrote a brief mark scheme in my exams and ticked off once I had covered aspects. It keeps it simple for the examiner to read.

    - Super foods - I binged on bananas, blueberries and apples and noticed a difference in concentration. Also, keep hydrated.

    - Gum - chewing gum during revision and during the exam seemed to help me concentrate.

    - Make a realistic timetable - if you're not going to revise for 8 hours a day solidly, then don't put it down. You'll feel like you're underachieving, behind on revision and panic as a result, meaning you still can't take all of that information in. There's no point in me saying 'revise for 20 minutes, break, 20 minutes' or 'revise for 2 hours per subject'. Everybody is different - sample and see what works best for you. It's not a competition to see who can do the most revision. I revised about 2 papers a day maximum and would only do the groundwork up to about 40 minutes per session, followed by a 20 minute break, where I would go for a walk. I would spend mornings on one paper and afternoons on the other. Past papers obviously took longer. Also, if you start getting tired and not taking anymore information in, it's time to put the books down.

    - Lastly, be strong but give yourself rewards - if you're doing it right and don't find yourself in a blind panic, I highly recommend a day of two off each week, but not next to each other (Wednesday and a Saturday), as you might become lazy, and use those days to let your hair down. There is nothing better than going out with friends on the weekends knowing you're on top of your revision. In the same breath, don't overdo it in regards to social life. If your friends are constantly nagging you to go out and you know that you need to revise, then say no. At the end of the day, this is your future, not their's and real friends will respect that and on results day, when you log on to UCAS and see a place is confirmed at your dream university, you know that saying no to excessive partying during exams was truly worth it! A few weeks versus the rest of your life - you choose!

    Hope this helps and feel free to PM me if you want anymore advice, particularly regarding personal statements, applications and revision!
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    Messed around first year. Got BCCC. Worked a bit harder during A2s and managed AAB in Maths Economics and Physics. Hard work pays off!


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    (Original post by Ehawks)
    Hey everyone,

    I remember reading these when I was in some of your positions and now I'm pleased that I can not only be one of the success stories, but hopefully motivate everyone.

    At AS, I got CEE in Geography, Economics and Philosophy and I managed to pull these grades up to AAB and hold an unconditional confirmed place starting next year!

    It is therefore definitely possible for anybody, especially given that my AS results were a wake up call, as I have been notoriously lazy, so for anybody willing to work hard, it is certainly possible. I'd suggest working smartly rather than hard. By this, I mean don't overdo it. I completely burned out during my exams and I panicked as a result and was finding it hard to revise.

    Revision tips

    You've probably heard them all before, but I finally took the advice and it paid off in the end.

    - Identify what type of learner you are - it will be counterproductive making revision cards if you're not suited to this type of revision.

    - Keep it simple - I burned out because I overcomplicated it and got muddled. Some people can just listen to recordings of themselves reading notes, while others like to draw mind maps and paragraphs. I personally thought I learn best by revision cards and mind maps, but I spent too much time making it look pretty and not getting anything out of it. My revision in the end, consisted of typed up notes, which I would scribble down from memory and then would write them down again really randomly, as well as past papers, examiner's reports and mark schemes. It didn't look pretty by the end, but it scruffy writing on lined pads seemed to work in the end. I'd therefore sample some revision methods now.

    - Ask questions where you're not sure. I think my teachers are sick of me now exams are over, but it was useful because some things you don't understand might just be your grade changing questions. They may also have sample answers and other useful resources. They can also mark your papers harshly and identify where you need to improve. If you're in the position of self-teaching or teachers you don't like, start or find a thread on student room and discuss it with people and also help them out - it really helps.

    - Don't just do past papers - read examiner's reports. They are essentially a guide to what the examiner wants and there's no point doing past papers and continuously making mark-costing errors. You'll notice in examiner's reports whiny comments, saying 'Students continuously make this error' - don't be that person. I found it useful highlighting and making my own aims and comments aside these. Additionally, the examining boards are likely to test on where students keep making errors, so it helps you prepare more for exams when doing last minute revision. I accurately predicted most of the questions, but don't swear by this, as they might throw a spanner in the works. Reports are probably why I went from an E on a couple of papers to A*s.

    - Focus on what you don't understand - going over something you know inside out will not gain you anymore marks. Sort out what you don't know and you will gain marks.

    - Learn mark schemes - you'll know how to structure and will be able to identify themes and patterns. I also wrote a brief mark scheme in my exams and ticked off once I had covered aspects. It keeps it simple for the examiner to read.

    - Super foods - I binged on bananas, blueberries and apples and noticed a difference in concentration. Also, keep hydrated.

    - Gum - chewing gum during revision and during the exam seemed to help me concentrate.

    - Make a realistic timetable - if you're not going to revise for 8 hours a day solidly, then don't put it down. You'll feel like you're underachieving, behind on revision and panic as a result, meaning you still can't take all of that information in. There's no point in me saying 'revise for 20 minutes, break, 20 minutes' or 'revise for 2 hours per subject'. Everybody is different - sample and see what works best for you. It's not a competition to see who can do the most revision. I revised about 2 papers a day maximum and would only do the groundwork up to about 40 minutes per session, followed by a 20 minute break, where I would go for a walk. I would spend mornings on one paper and afternoons on the other. Past papers obviously took longer. Also, if you start getting tired and not taking anymore information in, it's time to put the books down.

    - Lastly, be strong but give yourself rewards - if you're doing it right and don't find yourself in a blind panic, I highly recommend a day of two off each week, but not next to each other (Wednesday and a Saturday), as you might become lazy, and use those days to let your hair down. There is nothing better than going out with friends on the weekends knowing you're on top of your revision. In the same breath, don't overdo it in regards to social life. If your friends are constantly nagging you to go out and you know that you need to revise, then say no. At the end of the day, this is your future, not their's and real friends will respect that and on results day, when you log on to UCAS and see a place is confirmed at your dream university, you know that saying no to excessive partying during exams was truly worth it! A few weeks versus the rest of your life - you choose!

    Hope this helps and feel free to PM me if you want anymore advice, particularly regarding personal statements, applications and revision!
    Hi awesome post i gave u a rep

    Did you retake the whole year or did you sit AS retakes alongside A2?
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    (Original post by rakib567)
    Hi awesome post i gave u a rep

    Did you retake the whole year or did you sit AS retakes alongside A2?
    Thank you!

    I retook some AS modules alongside A2. That's why it's especially important to not overdo it. You channel all of your energy into the AS resits and often have a 2 week gap until the A2 exams, which I personally found quite daunting and tiring! My exam timetable certainly wasn't pretty!
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    (Original post by Ehawks)
    Thank you!

    I retook some AS modules alongside A2. That's why it's especially important to not overdo it. You channel all of your energy into the AS resits and often have a 2 week gap until the A2 exams, which I personally found quite daunting and tiring! My exam timetable certainly wasn't pretty!
    ah ok, can i ask you what a levels you did?
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    (Original post by rakib567)
    ah ok, can i ask you what a levels you did?
    Sure. I did Geography, Economics and Philosophy! You doing any of those?
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    (Original post by Itsmonique)
    I'm going to retake my English language to get a B overall, as the majority of universities want a B in English and Maths GCSE for the course that I am applying for. The exam officer then went on to say how even getting the B in English won't increase my chances in getting an offer at university! With the course that I want to apply for at least ABB-AAB. Then he went on to say how unis won't give me an offer because of my AS grades (BBBC). I was so upset but I am glad that my head of sixth form was there to witness this. Apparently I should only apply to universities that want applicants to have BBB-CCC.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    This is absolute tosh and I'm sorry you've had to go through this. I was too in a similar position was told not to bother applying to any goo Russell Group universities, but I got offers from all five of my universities (St Andrews, Exeter, Cardiff, Manchester and Sussex). I'm now off to Exeter, which is not exactly a rubbish university!

    These exams officers are often officers because they're not good enough to be actual teachers and have a lasting vendetta because they probably mucked up their exams and are taking it out on able students.

    It is certainly possible to get AAB or even AAA with your results! You've done pretty well, especially given the changes to the system. Universities will look more at your predicted grades than your achieved grades and it's not a huge leap from BBBC. Have a back up university but I can assure you that with a decent personal statement, you WILL get into at least one of the universities you are aspiring to!

    Best of luck with everything and anymore questions regarding anything like my experience, personal statements and general advice, feel free to PM me!
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    (Original post by samboJ)
    Well my story isn't so great as others - and neither are my final grades - but I'm happy with the outcome so why not share (*brag).

    AS: CDDD (Business, Maths, Economics, German respectively).

    Dropped German. Retook every single AS exam apart from German along with my A2's (in one exam session). 14 exams total.

    A2: BBC (Maths, Economics, Business respectively).

    Went through UCAS adjustment. Scraped my way into an ABB Economics course at Uni of Reading due to well written personal statement.

    I suppose going from CDDD to studying Economics at Reading is a decent achievement.
    Economics at reading? Omg, sorry Einstein, I wouldn't want to mess with someone as intelligent as you.
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    (Original post by SuperiorGenius)
    Economics at reading? Omg, sorry Einstein, I wouldn't want to mess with someone as intelligent as you.
    I saw someone on LinkedIn who went from reading uni to do a postgraduate Uni of Oxford..don't be such a snob

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    (Original post by nukethemaly)
    This is what I did to go from DDDE to A*A*AA:
    I've literally just printed this out and stuck it on the wall above my desk, I got DDDD in Chemistry, Maths, Biology and Psychology and now they're telling me to aim low with them predicting me BCA respectively if I drop psychology and you've inspired me so much that its possible to prove them wrong.
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    Got straight D's at as level. Six years on I'm on JSA but guess what? I'm happy
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    (Original post by Rbutton)
    I've literally just printed this out and stuck it on the wall above my desk, I got DDDD in Chemistry, Maths, Biology and Psychology and now they're telling me to aim low with them predicting me BCA respectively if I drop psychology and you've inspired me so much that its possible to prove them wrong.

    Why did your teachers predict you an A when you got a D at AS.

    No January exams unless with CIE.

    3 grades higher

    Extenuating circumstances?
 
 
 
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