Maths year 11

Announcements Posted on
How helpful is our apprenticeship zone? Have your say with our short survey 02-12-2016
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Incorrect. Please, lay it out as follows:

    2x + 12 + 6x + 8 = 32
    8x + 20 = 32

    Solve for x
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Incorrect. Please, lay it out as follows:

    2x + 12 + 6x + 8 = 32
    8x + 20 = 32

    Solve for x


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Attached Images
     
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Correct.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Correct.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Attached Images
     
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    You know how to do the first one.

    For the second one, let's say that polygon has an n number of sides. We know that the interior is 160. So you can recall your formula for getting the interior angle and apply it in terms of n. Not sure how challenging you would find this because it involves some algebraic manipulation (I can walk you through it if you wish). Or alternatively, you can also find it because you know that the exterior angle of a regular polygon is found by \frac{360}{n} so you can solve for n as you know what the exterior is. I believe this is the way they expect because it's shorter but either is valid.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RDKGames)
    You know how to do the first one.

    For the second one, let's say that polygon has an n number of sides. We know that the interior is 160. So you can recall your formula for getting the interior angle and apply it in terms of n. Not sure how challenging you would find this because it involves some algebraic manipulation (I can walk you through it if you wish). Or alternatively, you can also find it because you know that the exterior angle of a regular polygon is found by \frac{360}{n} so you can solve for n as you know what the exterior is. I believe this is the way they expect because it's shorter but either is valid.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Attached Images
     
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Correct. However, I think my GCSE polygon knowledge is a bit cloudy, because the answer to a should be 20 rather than 300.
    It makes sense to me that the exterior angle is 300 but I believe in GCSE the exterior angle is considered to be something like this:


    Look through your notes for the proper definition of what an external angle is and let me know.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/ks3/ma...ns/revision/3/
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    That's correct. But the first part is 20. As it's 180-160
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RDKGames)
    Correct. However, I think my GCSE polygon knowledge is a bit cloudy, because the answer to a should be 20 rather than 300.
    It makes sense to me that the exterior angle is 300 but I believe in GCSE the exterior angle is considered to be something like this:


    Look through your notes for the proper definition of what an external angle is and let me know.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/ks3/ma...ns/revision/3/
    This is correct, the diagram, exterior angle is 180-interior angle. The sum of the exterior angles must equal 360
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    This is correct, the diagram, exterior angle is 180-interior angle. The sum of the exterior angles must equal 360
    Are both answers correct?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Are both answers correct?
    The first one isn't. If this is foundation, then it makes sense that the answer to a is 20 and you use this in part b. However the second one is correct.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by 34908seikj)
    This is correct, the diagram, exterior angle is 180-interior angle. The sum of the exterior angles must equal 360
    Are both answers correct?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Are both answers correct?
    The first part isn't correct. You put 200 as 360-160 is 200. However to work out the exterior angle you do 180-160 which equals 20.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RDKGames)
    The first one isn't. If this is foundation, then it makes sense that the answer to a is 20 and you use this in part b. However the second one is correct.
    Help on this please


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Attached Images
     
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RDKGames)
    The first one isn't. If this is foundation, then it makes sense that the answer to a is 20 and you use this in part b. However the second one is correct.
    Help on this please
    .

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Help on this please


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Angles ABC and AHC are equal, angles BAH and BCH are equal. Use this to mark some angles and find the values of some of the angles and see what you can do.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Help on this please
    .

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I think you might need to ask your teacher to do foundation if you're struggeling this much. There is plenty of worked past papers on Google and YouTube but because there are 28 pages on this thread it makes me worry a bit
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by iHammmy)
    I think you might need to ask your teacher to do foundation if you're struggeling this much. There is plenty of worked past papers on Google and YouTube but because there are 28 pages on this thread it makes me worry a bit
    She said she is in year 10 and getting D's. Doing foundation would mean she wouldn't be far from the top grade. However, by working like this, she definitely has potential to get much higher grades but GCSE Higher Maths is literally getting the basic understanding, then applying it. Compared to the start of the thread, I can see she has improved a lot so I personally wouldn't suggest to move her down to foundation. Also not to mention she has another full year if Maths, this gives her plenty of time to work hard and reach a higher grade. I had a friend who was in this scenario in year 10 but now she is getting high B's. It just takes time for some.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MezmorisedPotato)
    She said she is in year 10 and getting D's. Doing foundation would mean she wouldn't be far from the top grade. However, by working like this, she definitely has potential to get much higher grades but GCSE Higher Maths is literally getting the basic understanding, then applying it. Compared to the start of the thread, I can see she has improved a lot so I personally wouldn't suggest to move her down to foundation. Also not to mention she has another full year if Maths, this gives her plenty of time to work hard and reach a higher grade. I had a friend who was in this scenario in year 10 but now she is getting high B's. It just takes time for some.
    Thank you so much

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by z_o_e)
    Help on this please


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    The blue angles are the interior angles of the two pentagons. You can find the red angles because it's a parallelogram where opposite angles are equal, and all of these add up to 360. Black angle + red angle should make up the interior angle of the regular pentagon, thus allowing you to find angle AEH.

    Name:  Pentagons.PNG
Views: 26
Size:  78.1 KB
 
 
 
Write a reply… Reply
Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. Oops, you need to agree to our Ts&Cs to register
  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: December 3, 2016
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Today on TSR
Poll
Would you rather have...?
Study resources

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.