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    (Original post by Zacken)
    STEP II, 2004, Q5 and STEP II, 2000, Q5.
    I have never understood the 2000 step 2 q5 I think i skipped over that q before. Where do i start because i did integral by parts and cos it was minimised equated it to 0. Am I off track?
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    (Original post by 11234)
    I have never understood the 2000 step 2 q5 I think i skipped over that q before. Where do i start because i did integral by parts and cos it was minimised equated it to 0. Am I off track?
    Completely. Why would you need to do it by parts? Just expand it out.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Completely. Why would you need to do it by parts? Just expand it out.
    sorry i feel so silly now...
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Completely. Why would you need to do it by parts? Just expand it out.
    Do you have any mat resources?
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    (Original post by 11234)
    Do you have any mat resources?
    first page of this thread
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    first page of this thread
    ignore me...
    (hows cambz btw?)
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    Help with 2006 part J pls
    http://www.mathshelper.co.uk/Oxford%...est%202006.pdf
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    (Original post by Carman3)
    Do you get marks for workings or just answers?
    There's no marks for working in the multiple choice (but put it down anyway), but in the other questions there's definitely marks for working.
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    Consider the distance between the centres. How can we use this information to tell whether the circles will intersect? More detailed information below:
    Spoiler:
    Show

    Okay, so we've got 2 circles. Circle A has centre (0,0) and radius 1, while circle B has centre (a,b) and radius r.

    The intersection of circles than happen in a few different ways: they intersect at more than one point (if the distance between the centres < sum of radii), they intersect at exactly one point (if the distance between the centres = the sum of the radii), or they do not intersect (distance between centres > sum of radii).

    The sum of the radii will be 1 + r, while the distance between the centres will be sqrt(a^2 + b^2). They don't intersect, so sqrt(a^2 + b^2) > 1 + r, so sqrt(a^2 + b^2) - r > 1. It should be fairly clear that (c) is the only part which applies. And if you think about it with each part, it should make sense: If you increase the distance between the centres, in parts (a) and (b) that could mean the circles will intersect again, and that's nonsense.
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    Posted from TSR Mobile

    I was able to get a start on the the 2004 paper on the bit in the middle but I am a bit stuck on the end bit when I need to find the value of A and B. Could you give me a little hint on how to progress? Here's what I got so far.
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    (Original post by alfmeister)
    I was able to get a start on the the 2004 paper on the bit in the middle but I am a bit stuck on the end bit when I need to find the value of A and B. Could you give me a little hint on how to progress? Here's what I got so far.

    Think on it for a while longer - then I'll give a hint or two.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    STEP II, 2004, Q5 and STEP II, 2000, Q5.
    Do you know of any good geometry questions?
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    Hi guys, I found 2 iv) of the 2012 paper to be very difficult. How did you guys find it?
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Integrate both sides of the given identity from -1 to 1, remember that the existing integral in that identity is just a number, you might find it helpful to call it u = \int_{-1}^1 f(t) \, \mathrm{d}t and then integrate both sides like so:

    \int_{-1}^1 6 \, \mathrm{d}x + \int_{-1}^{1} f(x) \, \mathrm{d}x = 2\int_{-1}^1 f(-x) \, \mathrm{d}x + u\int_{-1}^1 3x^2 \, \mathrm{d}x

    which then simplifies down to 12 + u = 2u + 2u where u is the answer you want.
    Sorry, why do we give the integral of f(x) between 1 and -1 the same value as the integral of f(t) between 1 and -1? i.e. "u"
    Are they the same?
    I let the integral of f(x) between 1 and -1 equal A.
    And I let the integral of f(t) between 1 and -1 equal U.
    Hence my confusion
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    (Original post by Mystery.)
    Do you know of any good geometry questions?
    Yuck, no. Geometry is shite, unless you mean some of the actual geomety like algebraic geometry.

    (Original post by Someboady)
    Sorry, why do we give the integral of f(x) between 1 and -1 the same value as the integral of f(t) between 1 and -1? i.e. "u"
    Are they the same?
    I let the integral of f(x) between 1 and -1 equal A.
    And I let the integral of f(t) between 1 and -1 equal U.
    Hence my confusion
    okay, integrate x dx between -1 and 1, what number do you get?
    Integrate t dt between -1 and 1, what number do you get?

    The t and x inside the integral don't matter, they're called dummy variables as long as the integral is a fefinite one with limits, then the letter doesn't matter since the integral just represents a number anyway.

    It's a bit (actually, almost exactly) why in summation notation, it doesn't matter what letter you choose. The sum from k=1 to 100 of k is the same as the sum from m=1 to 100 of m. The letters are just placeholders.

    This has tripped up many a student in the past.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    STEP II, 2004, Q5 and STEP II, 2000, Q5.
    Do you have any other recommendations for step questions to help prepare for MAT?
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    (Original post by KloppOClock)
    Do you have any other recommendations for step questions to help prepare for MAT?
    This wasn't to help prepare for MAT, it was just vaguely related to a MAT question.
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    2013 Q3 iV - Not sure if I'm being stupid here, but I got all of the algebra correct, I just can't seem to understand where they got their transformations from, if someone could offer a clearer explanation that would be great! When I did it I let x = 1+t and so got fk(x) = -f2-k(2-x), then did how I'd translate -f2-k(2-x) to f2-k(x)

    Question and solution:
    Spoiler:
    Show

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    (Original post by Zacken)
    This wasn't to help prepare for MAT, it was just vaguely related to a MAT question.
    Oh right, but do you think there are any particular step questions that would be worth doing anyway?
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    (Original post by KloppOClock)
    Oh right, but do you think there are any particular step questions that would be worth doing anyway?
    No, a typical MAT prep-er won't know enough content to attempt the vast majority of STEP questions and will struggle overly much on the few questions that are accessible. It's not worth it, MAT is easy enough - you don't need so much preparation.
 
 
 
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