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    • #53
    #53

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've suffered from pretty severe OCD for five years now; it crushed myself confidence and made me a pretty messed up individual.

    Only now am I kind of coming to terms with the fact that I really do need help (taken long enough)..and I'm so tired of having to pretend everything's okay- I daren't moan about it incase I annoy people.

    My parents still don't know but I hate to admit I can't help but feel ashamed and embarassed even though I know I shouldn't.

    Anyway, I'm interested in how people handle it whether it's yourself or someone you know.

    I think that there should be more of an emphasis on recognising mental illnesses because in my experience nobody really talks about them because they're kind of invisible if you get what I mean and my parents have often just labelled me as a 'hormonal' teenager :/
    I've had an eating disorder since i was 14 (i'm 18 now) and it interferes with every aspect of your day-to-day life, people think you can just get over it but people with real mental disorders can't always do that. I've improved a lot and am generally able to force myself to eat 'bad' foods but i still feel guilty and overweight and i don't think i'll ever be happy at the size i am
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    (Original post by fire2burn)
    May I ask what sort of symptoms you get with your psychosis and whether or not you are consciously aware of them being unusual or out of the ordinary when they occur?

    Sorry if I seem incredibly blunt by asking, it's rare that I come across other people with experience of psychosis thus I like to get their perspective on it, what it's like, how it impacts upon them, etc.

    You don't have to answer if you don't want to, or you could reply by PM. Either way it'd be nice to hear of your experiences and how you cope with them
    Sure, I don't mind you asking at all.

    Symptoms

    - Hallucinations (tactile, auditory, visual. My main thing is hearing voices)
    - Delusions (e.g. thought projections, grandeur stuff)
    - Extreme paranoia (thinking people are spying on me, trying to kill me, etc)
    - Distorted sense of visual perception (though they think that could be mild epilepsy)
    - Self-harm (though we managed to quickly get that under control. It was quite scary and not within my control for a while)
    - Suicidal thoughts/tendencies/attempts
    - Mixture of agoraphobia and claustrophobia (mostly the former)
    - Out-of-body sensations
    - Body and brain reliving last year's psychotic episode (which was far worse. Again, this is beyond my control. I really wish I didn't have to relive everything: it was awful enough first time round)
    - Generalised psychotic attacks, some of which have no identifiable triggers. We've worked out academic libraries and religious buildings are triggers

    When this first started happening to me at uni, I honestly had no idea what was going on and was terrified but couldn't articulate it to everyone. These days, I'm aware that what's happening is abnormal about 90-95% of the time, since mine is a seemingly milder form of psychosis. I'm also incredibly self-aware, which is what has made it so hard for them to diagnose me. That said, it doesn't make it much easier to control and there are times when I almost completely lose control of my brain, with near-fatal consequences.

    As for coping, I'm a tough cookie, far more resilient than I realise, have lots of loving and supportive friends and family members. I'm quite religious/spiritual and take a lot of comfort in and strength from that. I have an incredibly active guardian angel
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    Depression, anxiety, chronically low/no self esteem and self harming here.

    *waves to all*

    Currently awaiting to see a pyschiatrist, not looking forward to that at all, and on 10mg of cipralex.
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    (Original post by daisydaffodil)
    Depression, anxiety, chronically low/no self esteem and self harming here.

    *waves to all*

    Currently awaiting to see a pyschiatrist, not looking forward to that at all, and on 10mg of cipralex.
    :hugs:

    Try not to worry about the psychiatrist: it's likely it might not be as scary as you think. I've got a very nice psychiatrist :yes:
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Sure, I don't mind you asking at all.

    Symptoms

    - Hallucinations (tactile, auditory, visual. My main thing is hearing voices)
    - Delusions (e.g. thought projections, grandeur stuff)
    - Extreme paranoia (thinking people are spying on me, trying to kill me, etc)
    - Distorted sense of visual perception (though they think that could be mild epilepsy)
    - Self-harm (though we managed to quickly get that under control. It was quite scary and not within my control for a while)
    - Suicidal thoughts/tendencies/attempts
    - Mixture of agoraphobia and claustrophobia (mostly the former)
    - Out-of-body sensations
    - Body and brain reliving last year's psychotic episode (which was far worse. Again, this is beyond my control. I really wish I didn't have to relive everything: it was awful enough first time round)
    - Generalised psychotic attacks, some of which have no identifiable triggers. We've worked out academic libraries and religious buildings are triggers

    When this first started happening to me at uni, I honestly had no idea what was going on and was terrified but couldn't articulate it to everyone. These days, I'm aware that what's happening is abnormal about 90-95% of the time, since mine is a seemingly milder form of psychosis. I'm also incredibly self-aware, which is what has made it so hard for them to diagnose me. That said, it doesn't make it much easier to control and there are times when I almost completely lose control of my brain, with near-fatal consequences.

    As for coping, I'm a tough cookie, far more resilient than I realise, have lots of loving and supportive friends and family members. I'm quite religious/spiritual and take a lot of comfort in and strength from that. I have an incredibly active guardian angel
    Thank you for taking the time to reply Quite an extensive list of symptoms you experience. It is good to hear that you are self aware and conscious of what is occurring for you, I have been told by my psychiatrist that those with self awareness and insight are more likely to have better long term prospects than those who lack insight. It's just unfortunate that even though one can rationalise that an experience is out of the ordinary, it doesn't change the fact that it still occurs. Life would be much easier otherwise!

    Do you take any medication to help you? Also what do you think of diagnosis? As in would you find a conclusive diagnosis helpful or counter productive?


    These days I'm not so sure I agree with labelling unusual experiences as psychotic and thus medicalising them, maybe I've been reading too much Romme and Escher though I've been under the mental health services for nearly 3 years now and I'm still no closer to being 'cured' so I'm investigating alternative avenues and perspectives.
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    (Original post by fire2burn)
    Thank you for taking the time to reply Quite an extensive list of symptoms you experience. It is good to hear that you are self aware and conscious of what is occurring for you, I have been told by my psychiatrist that those with self awareness and insight are more likely to have better long term prospects than those who lack insight. It's just unfortunate that even though one can rationalise that an experience is out of the ordinary, it doesn't change the fact that it still occurs. Life would be much easier otherwise!

    Do you take any medication to help you? Also what do you think of diagnosis? As in would you find a conclusive diagnosis helpful or counter productive?


    These days I'm not so sure I agree with labelling unusual experiences as psychotic and thus medicalising them, maybe I've been reading too much Romme and Escher though I've been under the mental health services for nearly 3 years now and I'm still no closer to being 'cured' so I'm investigating alternative avenues and perspectives.
    I have to take 150mg of Sertraline a day and 3mg of risperidone (or however you spell it) once a day. So far it doesn't seem to do much other than make me more functioning (which is obviously good) and make me lose weight As for stopping any symptoms, it hasn't seemed to do that. I told them it wouldn't though.

    It was quite helpful to be told that I'm not schizophrenic or bipolar. I was highly amused by the diagnosis of 'nonspecific psychotic disorder'. I feel bad for my care team though: they're trying really hard, I'm clearly just a difficult case to diagnose. My psychiatrist has been tiptoeing round giving me any medical labels, which was quite infuriating, so I'm glad he finally has. That said, I don't think it accounts for everything that's happened to me.

    I definitely respond to religion better than medication, though CBT and having a psych nurse is incredibly helpful. My psychiatrist got so flummoxed that he once suggested I'd be better off seeing a priest than coming to see him :rofl:
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    (Original post by houseelf)
    I interpreted it as the latter; done it, stopped, then started again. But I honestly don't know for sure.

    Yeah, you should be alright. You may even find that your GP's willing to bend the facts slightly to help you - I know my Mental Health Worker encouraged me to still give it a go even though I've probably stopped and started at least 15 times. :rolleyes:
    I interpreted it as the latter as well.

    Ha that'd be nice! I've probably stopped and started the same amount of times but no professionals know so whatever
    • #54
    #54

    I've never seen a doctor about mine, but i self harm and i feel very alone and as if i don't know who i am at all. I have been through stages of obsessive exercise and a month or so when i barely ate.
    Would this be taken seriously by a doctor?
    I'm 18 and sitting my A levels soon and i'm scared i'm ruining my chances by feeling like this.
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    Hmm, I have a bit of a paranoid obsession with aliens. Every night when I go to sleep, I check my bedroom, check the back yard, and scan the dark corridors of my house for aliens lurking and watching me, sometimes I imagine that I am interacting with them. There have been a few times where I worry that they have infiltrated my dreams or something. I think it's just my overactive, paranoid imagination combined with OCD. I'm not sure how to explain it to people without making it sound psychotic.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've never seen a doctor about mine, but i self harm and i feel very alone and as if i don't know who i am at all. I have been through stages of obsessive exercise and a month or so when i barely ate.
    Would this be taken seriously by a doctor?
    I'm 18 and sitting my A levels soon and i'm scared i'm ruining my chances by feeling like this.
    A good doctor would definitely take you seriously and might be able to help you with your problems (however there are some bad doctors out there who are dismissive of mental health problems, but if you get one of these all you need to do is see another doctor).

    If you're ever feeling alone come join us in the depression society.
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    (Original post by Liquidus Zeromus)
    Hmm, I have a bit of a paranoid obsession with aliens. Every night when I go to sleep, I check my bedroom, check the back yard, and scan the dark corridors of my house for aliens lurking and watching me, sometimes I imagine that I am interacting with them. There have been a few times where I worry that they have infiltrated my dreams or something. I think it's just my overactive, paranoid imagination combined with OCD. I'm not sure how to explain it to people without making it sound psychotic.
    Have you told any medical health professional this? :console:
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    Mental ilness can afect your life very bad....traumatic periods that you can never forget....memory full with thoughts about the past....scary life...
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Have you told any medical health professional this? :console:
    Not yet. I haven't had the chance, not heard anything about a psychiatric referral yet. I might mention it to my GP on Thursday, though it might be more trouble than it's worth to say such things. They might send me straight to the loony bin if they don't listen to what I'm saying very carefully. Not a good thing to happen, least of all right before exams.
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    (Original post by Liquidus Zeromus)
    Not yet. I haven't had the chance, not heard anything about a psychiatric referral yet. I might mention it to my GP on Thursday, though it might be more trouble than it's worth to say such things. They could send me straight to the loony bin if they don't listen to what I'm saying very carefully. Not a good thing to do just before exams.
    Well they haven't sent me to the loony bin yet and I doubt they ever will, so I'm sure you'll be OK to mention it to your GP :yes:
    • #55
    #55

    My mums had OCD for nine years (cleansiness). i cannot bring books or anything home therefore i cannot revise for my exams so i have to come to my grandmas everyweekend to do homework and holidays to revise for jan and june exams. im currently studying AS. We just have to adjust to life mate..
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Well they haven't sent me to the loony bin yet and I doubt they ever will, so I'm sure you'll be OK to mention it to your GP :yes:
    That's a bit of a relief considering you have outright hallucinations, though I'm guessing it depends on the doctor. I know I should, it seems relevant to what's going on in my head. At least, it could speed things up somewhat if they think anything of it :yawn:
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    (Original post by Liquidus Zeromus)
    That's a bit of a relief, though I'm guessing it depends on the doctor. I really should. At least, it could speed things up a little :yawn:
    The thing to bear in mind is that you're aware that this isn't really a normal state of mind and a common belief in society. Self awareness and reasoning skills aren't something every mentally ill person has. Being able to identify this as an unusual belief is a good step in a good direction

    Do mention it. It probably would speed things up/get you taken more seriously. It can be a bit daunting telling someone but you must remember that medical professionals hear all kinds of weird stuff from a wide variety of people and respectfully and sensitively deal with that. My care team, for example, have clearly never had a religious Catholic patient before and thus find it a bit weird, but they're very nice and accommodating about it and are willing to listen and learn :yes:
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    My depression affects my studying so much. I'm on medication and I have a good support network, but I still can't seem to manage to motivate myself to do anything. I'm always tired and everything just goes round in a vicious circle until I get to the point where I'm really depressed and don't know what to do anymore. My MHA says that I'm the barrier that's preventing me from doing the things I want. Yes, the depression is there, but I can't totally blame that. I don't know what to think about that. I'd like to think I have control over things. I don't know why I'm sat here typing this, I should be using the little energy I have to revise.

    Hugs to you all :hug:
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    :hugs:

    Try not to worry about the psychiatrist: it's likely it might not be as scary as you think. I've got a very nice psychiatrist :yes:
    Hopefully. I've never seen one before, or any senior mental health person. I've seen a nurse therapist and a nurse counsellor but noone else so I'm really scared, I'm not sure what they're going to ask. It's up at my GP surgery though so that's comforting at least, I trust my GP so will try to remember she's only 4 or 5 doors down the corridor.
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    (Original post by daisydaffodil)
    Hopefully. I've never seen one before, or any senior mental health person. I've seen a nurse therapist and a nurse counsellor but noone else so I'm really scared, I'm not sure what they're going to ask. It's up at my GP surgery though so that's comforting at least, I trust my GP so will try to remember she's only 4 or 5 doors down the corridor.
    The first time I saw my psychiatrist in London, we had a chat through symptoms and he asked some questions about those (clearly mentally crossing off possible disorders as he went along) and asked a bit about my home and uni life :yes: It was a similar case with the one in Oxford.

    It's mainly about establishing why you're there and what they can do to try and help you. They're not out to get you :nah:
 
 
 
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