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    stuck on 3i on 2010
    have sinx<x<tanx
    dont understand how they get from that to the answer help !
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    i take 20 minutes on each of the longer questions. leave about 50 minutes for the multiple choice.

    then have about 15 mins to go through any bits i missed (usually the very last part of a longer q)
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    (Original post by souktik)
    Thanks for the clarification, I was under the impression that my solutions need to be singularly novel to earn full credit. I hope that I'll be able to explain everything logically.

    What kind of MAT scores do accepted international applicants generally have? 80 minimum?

    Also, are there any current Oxford math students here who would possibly consider reading my statement and telling me how bad it is? I know it's rather terrible, I just want the opinion of a current student. I really don't want to put it up online and ask for comments from everyone, though.
    The Oxford website (the page which has the past papers) says the average score of successful applicants for each year.

    I'm assuming you're hoping for a place in an Ivy too?
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    (Original post by cem101)
    stuck on 3i on 2010
    have sinx<x<tanx
    dont understand how they get from that to the answer help !
    No offense, but you do realize that there are answers to all tests online? There's nothing wrong with needing help, but once people start giving you tips, it's not exactly a realistic simulation of the actual test situation, so you might as well look those up.

    If the online answers are not explanatory enough, ignore this comment. In that case I understand why you would come to TSR for help.
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    I asked earlier for help on question 5 (v) from 2007 earlier but I don't think anyone saw the post. I don't understand the answer given in the solutions, could someone please explain the answer?
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    (Original post by SherlockHolmes)
    I asked earlier for help on question 5 (v) from 2007 earlier but I don't think anyone saw the post. I don't understand the answer given in the solutions, could someone please explain the answer?
    What element don't you understand?
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    (Original post by CD315)
    The Oxford website (the page which has the past papers) says the average score of successful applicants for each year.

    I'm assuming you're hoping for a place in an Ivy too?
    Hoping? Yeah. Expecting? No.
    Actually, I'm applying to a lot of American universities, my top choices being non-Ivy institutes where I don't stand any chance at all (MIT, Stanford, UChicago and Caltech). As for Oxford, my chances of being able to attend are really low even if I miraculously get accepted. I'm completely dependent on the Reach Scholarship if that happens, can't go if I don't get it.

    Yes, I've seen those, I was just guessing that it'd be higher for international students.
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    (Original post by souktik)
    Hoping? Yeah. Expecting? No.
    Actually, I'm applying to a lot of American universities, my top choices being non-Ivy institutes where I don't stand any chance at all (MIT, Stanford, UChicago and Caltech). As for Oxford, my chances of being able to attend are really low even if I miraculously get accepted. I'm completely dependent on the Reach Scholarship if that happens, can't go if I don't get it.

    Yes, I've seen those, I was just guessing that it'd be higher for international students.
    Awesome. I wish I had the extra curriculars to even apply to the US - would love to go.

    I doubt it'd be much higher for internationals.
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    (Original post by CD315)
    What element don't you understand?
    Thanks for the response.

    I don't understand what the solutions from the website is saying. They haven't used any words to explain what they're doing so I assume it is meant to be obvious.

    I was hoping someone could explain how they work towards the solution.

    I have attached the answer.
    Attached Images
     
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    (Original post by TheGoldenRatio)
    how is the answer to this DAttachment 250153

    how did you know the answer was d?
    This is in the 2006 paper which there isn't solutions for.
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    (Original post by CD315)
    Awesome. I wish I had the extra curriculars to even apply to the US - would love to go.

    I doubt it'd be much higher for internationals.
    Oh, I don't have great extra curriculars either, and the ones I do have are academic ones. But I figured that it wouldn't hurt to try.
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    (Original post by SherlockHolmes)
    Thanks for the response.

    I don't understand what the solutions from the website is saying. They haven't used any words to explain what they're doing so I assume it is meant to be obvious.

    I was hoping someone could explain how they work towards the solution.

    I have attached the answer.
    Using the definition of g(n) where n is even, you can do what you did in part iv.

    So you have;

    g(2^l+2^k) = 1 + g(2^{l-1}+2^{k-1}) = 1 + 1 + g(2^{l-2} + 2^{k-2}) + ...

    Now, since l>k, we know that the second power of 2 will approach 0 before the first one. So we have;

    k + g(2^{l-k} + 2^0) = k + g(2^{l-k} + 1)

    Since this is an odd term, you use the other definition for g(n) and combine this with your answer to part iv (subbing l-k instead of just k).
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    (Original post by CD315)
    Using the definition of g(n) where n is even, you can do what you did in part iv.

    So you have;

    g(2^l+2^k) = 1 + g(2^{l-1}+2^{k-1}) = 1 + 1 + g(2^{l-2} + 2^{k-2}) + ...

    Now, since l>k, we know that the second power of 2 will approach 0 before the first one. So we have;

    k + g(2^{l-k} + 2^0) = k + g(2^{l-k} + 1)

    Since this is an odd term, you use the other definition for g(n) and combine this with your answer to part iv (subbing l-k instead of just k).
    Now I understand! Thank you very much.
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    (Original post by SherlockHolmes)
    Now I understand! Thank you very much.
    Awesome
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    I've done 1999 and 2002 from this website:
    http://www.mathshelper.co.uk/oxb.htm
    Although there aren't solutions. Would anyone else like to do them too and then we can compare our answers?
    My answers for both papers:
    Spoiler:
    Show
    1999

    a i
    b iii
    c i couldn't get this one
    d iv
    e iii
    f i
    g ii
    h iii
    j i
    k couldn't get this one either! my answer was 4*49*48/(52*51*50) -= 0.07 which isn't an option

    2. a) (x+3)(x-2)
    b) a is greater than or equal to -1/4.
    x= - 1 plus or minus the square root of (1+4a) all over 2
    (just the quadratic formula)
    c) when x=1, the whole thing equals zero, no matter what b is.. you get 1 - b - 1 + b
    b=-1/4 which I've said is the only value for b

    3. I don't think I knew what I was doing in this question, especially c.

    a) y=-x+3
    b) subbing in x=1, gives you y=2, no matter the value of a. just like question 2
    y= 2 + 1/a - x/a
    c) x=1 is one line. I haven't been able to come up with a general formula for the equations of the lines, but I think y=(4-root3)x + root 3 -2, might be one of them

    4. Quite confused with this question.
    a) for both integrals I got 2/3
    b)
    c) I got zero, but it says the area should be measured positively and I don't think zero counts as positive. Maybe because I've done top curve minus the bottom curve in my integration I'm showing that I'm measuring it positively?
    d) I don't know! It's difficult to see graphically that the difference in areas above and below the x axis will be the same as it is for the quadratic.

    5. a) 16*15*14*13= 43680
    b)4^4 = 256
    c) 4*3*2*1=24

    2002

    a a
    b a
    c c
    d b
    e d
    f b
    g a
    h d
    i c
    j a

    Question 2 appeared in a later paper, so I have the answers for that. 3 didn't work out well for me. 4:Name:  SAM_0386.jpg
Views: 176
Size:  398.8 KB

    5. i) i haven't written down an answer, for a guess I'll go for 18
    ii) a yes b no c yes d no
    iii) a yes b yes c no d yes
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    Anybody else find the MAT paper in 2010 extremely hard? I went from 85 percent to under 50 in this one.
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    Anyone absolutely bricking it? I feel like I'm not ready but I don't have anything else to do - I've done all the papers available to me twice..
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    (Original post by MEPS1996)
    Anybody else find the MAT paper in 2010 extremely hard? I went from 85 percent to under 50 in this one.
    That sounds scary, I'll take a look. Tell me, how are you grading yourself?
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    (Original post by CD315)
    Anyone absolutely bricking it? I feel like I'm not ready but I don't have anything else to do - I've done all the papers available to me twice..
    Quite the opposite, I've looked at just the last two papers. Now I'll check out 2010.
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    (Original post by MEPS1996)
    Anybody else find the MAT paper in 2010 extremely hard? I went from 85 percent to under 50 in this one.
    i found it hard...but still managed to complete as much. i got 84 in that one
 
 
 
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