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    Got a surprising unconditional offer from Leicester today! It'll most likely end up being my insurance, but it's such a relief that, no matter what and regardless of grades, I'll be going to study law, and I won't have to deal with clearing or a gap year!
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    (Original post by sebklaine)
    Got rejected from LSE for law, oddly enough, not because of my grades but apparently because my PS wasn't good enough, and I fancy myself a better writer than a test-taker (international student).
    doesn't look too good for oxford now
    LSE has a habit of using this line for their rejections. as for whether or not it's because of your chances at oxbridge, that seems like a TSR conspiracy theory to me (it doesn't make sense from LSE's perspective). however, the UK gov't has all kinds of admission restrictions that put pressure on the schools, so they're looking for much more than just qualification for the program. at the level of LSE or oxbridge, each law department has a vision of what they want their reputation to be, and their student selection has to reflect that. so LSE has to decide if you have the personality and goals to fit their teaching style and focus. your app may be great, but if the PS doesn't reflect the specific qualities that LSE are looking for, they still won't make you an offer. it may seem unfair, but honestly the admissions tutors know inside and out what their uni is like, and if they don't think you'll do as well there, it's very likely true - especially if you've given them a great example of who you are in that PS.

    don't worry about oxford because of this. LSE rejected me last year for the same reason, and I still got an interview for oxford. they know they're going to interview you if you're academically viable, so they don't rely on the PS as much as other schools. my advice to you is to use your energy preparing for an interview, as that's the most important/difficult part of your oxford app. as an international student myself, I can say that the stress of traveling and culture shock affected my interview a lot more than I expected, so do yourself a favor and over-prepare. even if you're not going there for the interview, do your research on what they expect because interviews are just as different across cultures as everything else.
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    I've seen people rejected from LSE for all kinds of reasons that seem banal to me (but must obviously mean something to them). The weird thing is, everyone I've seen or known with an offer from Oxbridge was also denied by LSE.

    Out of all the places I've applied LSE is by far the place I want to go to the most but I'm in the same boat as a lot of people in that I have no idea what is good enough or not for them. I believe my application to be strong but from what I've seen it can be pot luck with them.

    (Original post by Rhia Louise)
    pretty sure they don't...
    This is both true and false. LSE make it very clear on their website that since they don't hold interviews or use the LNAT they place a lot more weight on the personal statement that other universities. Following this they have a page which is titled something along the lines of "What makes a good personal statement?" in which they outline key question they wish to be answered.

    Luckily these guidelines are very good in general for writing a personal statement for Law and there's nothing about them that would only be good for LSE -- they're all key points any good personal statement should address. So in one sense they do ask for certain things out of a personal statement and I can see how someone would feel this equates to having to write a specialised personal statement; but they're only guidelines and it's not like they'd botch your application to other places. (That said, you'd have to be silly when applying to LSE not to take their own advice!)
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    I submitted my application on Wednesday for the following courses:

    King's - Politics, Philosophy & Law (A*AA)
    UCL - Law (A*AA)
    LSE - Law (A*AA)
    Queen Mary - Law & Politics (AAA)
    Durham - Law (A*AA)

    At GCSE i got 2 A*s, 6 As, and one B (in maths). I also did EPQ (which counts as an AS), in which I got a B. This summer, i got AAA in Economics, Politics, and Geography (only 3 ASs as I was studying Pre-U History, but also have an EPQ from year 11). My predicted grades are A*A*A and I feel the LNAT went well (sat on Wednesday). I was achieving 28-31 in the practice MCQs I did, and I feel my exam was actually slightly easier than any practice I did and I also got a nice essay on whether there should be anonymity for those arrested for criminal offences. My PS included work experience at a solicitor's firm, volunteering, the books: 'The Law Machine'; 'Letters to a Law Student'; and 'Great Debates in Criminal Law', 2 MOOCs with a legal focus, and a legal essay competition for which i was invited to the offices of Herbert Smith Freehils to meet their advocacy team for a skills session.

    Since submitting my application and reading various threads, however, I have started to slightly regret my choices as I now believe I may struggle to get offers after seeing the calibre of students applying to similar unis for law. (Primarily due to my GCSEs which are weak for my school). Can anyone with experience/knowledge comment on my chances of obtaining offers and the unis I've applied to for law more generally? worried now lol

    thanks
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    Congrats! How long did your offer take and what were your ASs/predicted grades if you don't mind me asking? applied for the same course on wednesday!
    (Original post by JodieHarriett18)
    Received an offer today for Law and Politics at Queen Mary
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    I've got three offers and an interview now, whoop!
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    (Original post by mitchriding)
    I submitted my application on Wednesday for the following courses:

    King's - Politics, Philosophy & Law (A*AA)
    UCL - Law (A*AA)
    LSE - Law (A*AA)
    Queen Mary - Law & Politics (AAA)
    Durham - Law (A*AA)

    At GCSE i got 2 A*s, 6 As, and one B (in maths). I also did EPQ (which counts as an AS), in which I got a B. This summer, i got AAA in Economics, Politics, and Geography (only 3 ASs as I was studying Pre-U History, but also have an EPQ from year 11). My predicted grades are A*A*A and I feel the LNAT went well (sat on Wednesday). I was achieving 28-31 in the practice MCQs I did, and I feel my exam was actually slightly easier than any practice I did and I also got a nice essay on whether there should be anonymity for those arrested for criminal offences. My PS included work experience at a solicitor's firm, volunteering, the books: 'The Law Machine'; 'Letters to a Law Student'; and 'Great Debates in Criminal Law', 2 MOOCs with a legal focus, and a legal essay competition for which i was invited to the offices of Herbert Smith Freehils to meet their advocacy team for a skills session.

    Since submitting my application and reading various threads, however, I have started to slightly regret my choices as I now believe I may struggle to get offers after seeing the calibre of students applying to similar unis for law. (Primarily due to my GCSEs which are weak for my school). Can anyone with experience/knowledge comment on my chances of obtaining offers and the unis I've applied to for law more generally? worried now lol

    thanks
    To apply to LSE dont you need 4 AS levels?
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    (Original post by ohdarlin)
    LSE has a habit of using this line for their rejections. as for whether or not it's because of your chances at oxbridge, that seems like a TSR conspiracy theory to me (it doesn't make sense from LSE's perspective). however, the UK gov't has all kinds of admission restrictions that put pressure on the schools, so they're looking for much more than just qualification for the program. at the level of LSE or oxbridge, each law department has a vision of what they want their reputation to be, and their student selection has to reflect that. so LSE has to decide if you have the personality and goals to fit their teaching style and focus. your app may be great, but if the PS doesn't reflect the specific qualities that LSE are looking for, they still won't make you an offer. it may seem unfair, but honestly the admissions tutors know inside and out what their uni is like, and if they don't think you'll do as well there, it's very likely true - especially if you've given them a great example of who you are in that PS.

    don't worry about oxford because of this. LSE rejected me last year for the same reason, and I still got an interview for oxford. they know they're going to interview you if you're academically viable, so they don't rely on the PS as much as other schools. my advice to you is to use your energy preparing for an interview, as that's the most important/difficult part of your oxford app. as an international student myself, I can say that the stress of traveling and culture shock affected my interview a lot more than I expected, so do yourself a favor and over-prepare. even if you're not going there for the interview, do your research on what they expect because interviews are just as different across cultures as everything else.
    I've always heard that law interviews are largely supposed to be unprepared for as there isn't much you can do.. I'm spying for camb not ox but how would you suggest I 'overprepare' like what sorts of things should I do ?
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    (Original post by mitchriding)
    I submitted my application on Wednesday for the following courses:

    King's - Politics, Philosophy & Law (A*AA)
    UCL - Law (A*AA)
    LSE - Law (A*AA)
    Queen Mary - Law & Politics (AAA)
    Durham - Law (A*AA)

    At GCSE i got 2 A*s, 6 As, and one B (in maths). I also did EPQ (which counts as an AS), in which I got a B. This summer, i got AAA in Economics, Politics, and Geography (only 3 ASs as I was studying Pre-U History, but also have an EPQ from year 11). My predicted grades are A*A*A and I feel the LNAT went well (sat on Wednesday). I was achieving 28-31 in the practice MCQs I did, and I feel my exam was actually slightly easier than any practice I did and I also got a nice essay on whether there should be anonymity for those arrested for criminal offences. My PS included work experience at a solicitor's firm, volunteering, the books: 'The Law Machine'; 'Letters to a Law Student'; and 'Great Debates in Criminal Law', 2 MOOCs with a legal focus, and a legal essay competition for which i was invited to the offices of Herbert Smith Freehils to meet their advocacy team for a skills session.

    Since submitting my application and reading various threads, however, I have started to slightly regret my choices as I now believe I may struggle to get offers after seeing the calibre of students applying to similar unis for law. (Primarily due to my GCSEs which are weak for my school). Can anyone with experience/knowledge comment on my chances of obtaining offers and the unis I've applied to for law more generally? worried now lol

    thanks
    Hey, those seem like good stats if you ask me (a person's who's gone through the process but beyond that has no knowledge/experience, just so it's clear) . But law is extremely competitive. The thing is, lot's of people go into law because it sounds nice, because "why not?". So it might be particularly important to show your real interest and passion for the subject. Which at first glance, it seems you have done on your PS through your numerous extra curriculars. (Although I should say that half of the people on this site alone have mentioned the Law Machine and Letters to a Law Student in their PS, but as long as your thoughts on it were original, it should be fine).

    Basically, it's impossible to predict which unis will give you offers and which won't. That's why it's good to have viable insurance choices, and that's why UCAS does Clearing. My advice is that it's too late to change anything, so try not to worry about it anymore, and study for your A-Levels, because all the unis you're applying to will give you A*AA or AAA offers, if they do give you one.
    Best of luck with you applications!
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    (Original post by doctorwhofan98)
    Got a surprising unconditional offer from Leicester today! It'll most likely end up being my insurance, but it's such a relief that, no matter what and regardless of grades, I'll be going to study law, and I won't have to deal with clearing or a gap year!
    Congratulations! What were your AS grades and A2 predictions?
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    (Original post by Pradia)
    I've always heard that law interviews are largely supposed to be unprepared for as there isn't much you can do.. I'm spying for camb not ox but how would you suggest I 'overprepare' like what sorts of things should I do ?
    okay, full disclosure: I know very little about cambridge, so take my advice with a grain of salt. I'll try to keep it general.

    ours is definitely a different type of preparation than for other subjects. it's not about what you know, but it is about your frame of mind. a big part of law interviews/study is recognizing criteria and applying them. this is where legal knowledge can make things worse; you might revert to your knowledge of the law rather than the criteria they've given to you. anyway, for most of us this skill is raw and underused, since it's not really taught in school. so just practice it - read appeal cases, take untimed lsat/lnat practice tests (especially the lsat, as they have a specific section for criteria analysis), or ask friends to debate with you about anything that involves criteria (who played the best james bond, for example). if you're going to law school you probably want to hone this skill anyway, so you might as well start before your interview.

    the other important thing I'd suggest is learning to verbalize your thought process. they need to know how you think, and they want as much information about that as possible. take some time to learn how to explain what you're thinking. the best way to do this is to debate (with someone patient) or stage a practice interview (which you should do anyway). it's better to practice interviewing with a lawyer, but really anyone can do it. you just need to make sure you can talk the tutor through your analysis, rather than announcing your answer with no explanation. to me, this is just a matter of breaking the school habit of right/wrong answers. law tutors aren't going to ask simple questions; they want to see how you wrestle with a problem to which you don't have a clear answer.

    so when I say you should over-prepare, I don't really mean study. just make sure you can present yourself accurately. stress will probably make you fall back on what you're comfortable with, so familiarize yourself with the skill set you need for the interview. that way you can focus on your actual thought process and fully respond to the questions, rather than trying to remember how to identify criteria in the first place.

    lastly, do your research! in addition to the oxbridge pages on interviews, there are some really great youtube videos about them, from the unis themselves and from current/past students. type 'oxbridge interview' into youtube and check them out for more advice. I'm particularly fond of this guy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCn6-3D5z2E good luck!
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    (Original post by mitchriding)
    I submitted my application on Wednesday for the following courses:

    King's - Politics, Philosophy & Law (A*AA)
    UCL - Law (A*AA)
    LSE - Law (A*AA)
    Queen Mary - Law & Politics (AAA)
    Durham - Law (A*AA)

    At GCSE i got 2 A*s, 6 As, and one B (in maths). I also did EPQ (which counts as an AS), in which I got a B. This summer, i got AAA in Economics, Politics, and Geography (only 3 ASs as I was studying Pre-U History, but also have an EPQ from year 11). My predicted grades are A*A*A and I feel the LNAT went well (sat on Wednesday). I was achieving 28-31 in the practice MCQs I did, and I feel my exam was actually slightly easier than any practice I did and I also got a nice essay on whether there should be anonymity for those arrested for criminal offences. My PS included work experience at a solicitor's firm, volunteering, the books: 'The Law Machine'; 'Letters to a Law Student'; and 'Great Debates in Criminal Law', 2 MOOCs with a legal focus, and a legal essay competition for which i was invited to the offices of Herbert Smith Freehils to meet their advocacy team for a skills session.

    Since submitting my application and reading various threads, however, I have started to slightly regret my choices as I now believe I may struggle to get offers after seeing the calibre of students applying to similar unis for law. (Primarily due to my GCSEs which are weak for my school). Can anyone with experience/knowledge comment on my chances of obtaining offers and the unis I've applied to for law more generally? worried now lol

    thanks
    as an American student I can't say much about your grades, but the stuff you put in your PS looks really good to me. for the PS it does depend on how you write about it, though. mainly I just want to let you know that UCAS will let you add choices if you're unsuccessful. log in to track (when it's working again) and look through the FAQs to the right of your choices list. there should be info there about adding choices if you're rejected. just make sure you do it before responding to any offers.
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    (Original post by th_lauren)
    The open day was fab and it is so beautiful. Fingers crossed for you❤️
    Thank you! Fingers crossed for you too! I just got an offer from Sheffield last night
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    (Original post by palakattu42)
    Congratulations! What were your AS grades and A2 predictions?
    Thanks! I got AAABB at AS, and I'm predicted A*AA.
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    (Original post by Praveen101)
    To apply to LSE dont you need 4 AS levels?
    Yeah and it's the same for UCL. I have the EPQ which counts as an AS level and also our school have written to UCL to explain the fact that they made us do pre-U history instead of A-level so nobody has AS history. A guy u know was successful in applying to UCL and he ended up getting an offer so I can only assume they're reasonable and understand our circumstances
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    Hey guys,


    I wanted to know if someone had applied to "law with french law" or "law and french law"?
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    (Original post by anelisesg)
    Hey guys,
    I wanted to know if someone had applied to "law with french law" or "law and french law"?
    I have! Are you applying for that course too?
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    Yes I did !
    I applied to Oxford KCL UCL LSE and Warwick (although for Warwick and LSE I applied to the regular law course).
    I'm franco-British that's why I applied to the course. What about you ?
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    (Original post by anelisesg)
    Yes I did !
    I applied to Oxford KCL UCL LSE and Warwick (although for Warwick and LSE I applied to the regular law course).
    I'm franco-British that's why I applied to the course. What about you ?
    That's great! I've also applied to Oxford and KCL's Law with French law course.
    I applied because I think the course is so interesting! We'd study both common law and civil law, from the countries that pretty much invented them, or at least have a strong tradition of it. I'm also hoping to do international law in the future, which is a mixture of common and civil law, so I thought this course would be good Plus, the course at KCL would allow to practice law in both countries (after additional exams of course). Hahaha sorry I'm rambling, I'm just so excited for the course
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    If anyone needs any law textbooks by the way, I'm selling lots of cheap ones.

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/mambodingo...1&_ipg=&_from=

    Also, for all you prospective law students out there, if you want to do a law degree in less than 3 years, the University of Buckingham has a 2 year course which I am just about to finish. I am about to graduate, so if you're thinking about doing a law degree, I would absolutely do it. Anyone can do law. Even if you don't end up practicing, it is a great degree to have.
 
 
 
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