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    In other words OP, we're all pretty different, so maybe try and see what works best for you?

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    (Original post by Mrs House)
    I agree. I made notes in first year and my mark was way below average. Decided to ditch notes and just read and understand concepts and going over things again and again and my mark in second year was marginally better.

    Bit nerve wracking that I don't have a "safe" place for my revision when the time comes but if I understand it initially I think it'll be alright.
    (Original post by Asklepios)
    Writing notes is only really beneficial for me when I need to have everything in one place -- like pathology, clinical features, management rather than having to consult three textbooks +/- NICE guidelines or whatever online. But yeah rewriting and rewriting is pointless
    (Original post by violin101)
    For my first year I wrote notes summarising each lecture after each one to make sure I'd understood everything, adding bits from textbooks to places where I had difficulty. I'd agree with everyone else when it comes to rewriting though - you really want to summarise, not just copy what's on the slides. This meant I had everything in one place when it came to revising so I didn't have to write any more notes then which I found really useful.
    (Original post by MJK91)
    Tried making notes and it failed miserably for me; I'm better with flashcards, reading lecture slides then consolidating with a relevant summary chapter in a book somewhere.
    easier to address everything in 1 post...

    OP its very clear everyone has different methods which work for them, its all about trying things out and seeing if it fits for you.

    For me notes (summarising lectures) was invaluable when it came to revision and using the information. Its important to make sure that the notes are a summary of the lecture, rather than just rewriting the whole thing again, this is harder in first year when its all a bit new but you will perfect the technique over time. I also find for me on a CBL style course, typing out the lecture notes allows me to add relevant information from textbooks and have all the information on one topic in the same place, which is brill for revision.

    I have to admit some things just dont need notes, absorbing the information and reflection upon it (re-reading the notes you made in a class) are perfectly sufficient for some things, also try to vary your revision a lot, I enjoy making summary posters (very visual) and flashcards to revise from, as rewriting the same notes over and over again is just pointless.

    As stated everyone is different, my method of summarising lectures and textbook information in note form then revising from posters, flashcards, revision videos etc. work wonders for me in first year and I (somehow - I have no idea how) pass in the top 20% of the year, it also seems to be a very common method!
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    I think writing and re-writing notes is painfully inefficient and isn't that beneficial.

    👀




    I do this. :p:

    (Thereby proving the point we are all different blah blah etc)
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    I'm supremely lazy. For preclinical I didn't make notes, I didn't go to lectures; I watched House throughout the term and flicked through the PowerPoints the night before exams. For clinicals I turn up, see patients, read an Oxford Handbook or two. Let's see how it all pans out but it has worked so far.
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    So annoying that the university doesn't publish graduation dates until March for graduations in June - makes any kind of planning for literally anything impossible. No idea why they can't release it earlier...
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    Haha wait until you're qualified and they don't give you you're rota until 2 weeks before you start your job!
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    (Original post by Smile88egc)
    Haha wait until you're qualified and they don't give you you're rota until 2 weeks before you start your job!
    Same as med school then :P


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    (Original post by Beska)
    So annoying that the university doesn't publish graduation dates until March for graduations in June - makes any kind of planning for literally anything impossible. No idea why they can't release it earlier...
    They put our graduation literally in the middle day of a 4 week break.

    So I didn't attend and actually made use of my final holiday. I don't care about some silly ceremony wearing silly robes. I think the price of the gown was > £100 for us as well even to hire? Felt like a scam.

    I think I was the only one to feel this way though :p:
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    They put our graduation literally in the middle day of a 4 week break.

    So I didn't attend and actually made use of my final holiday. I don't care about some silly ceremony wearing silly robes. I think the price of the gown was > £100 for us as well even to hire? Felt like a scam.

    I think I was the only one to feel this way though :p:
    I feel this way. I am planning (well, hoping) to have a big solo holiday pre fy1 and I have a feeling that graduation will fall somewhere in teh middle of it. I've never been one for ceremony though so I think I'd much rather be on a beach than sat in a stuffy hall.
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    (Original post by That Bearded Man)
    In other words OP, we're all pretty different, so maybe try and see what works best for you?

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    (Original post by Natalierm2707)
    easier to address everything in 1 post...

    OP its very clear everyone has different methods which work for them, its all about trying things out and seeing if it fits for you.

    For me notes (summarising lectures) was invaluable when it came to revision and using the information. Its important to make sure that the notes are a summary of the lecture, rather than just rewriting the whole thing again, this is harder in first year when its all a bit new but you will perfect the technique over time. I also find for me on a CBL style course, typing out the lecture notes allows me to add relevant information from textbooks and have all the information on one topic in the same place, which is brill for revision.

    I have to admit some things just dont need notes, absorbing the information and reflection upon it (re-reading the notes you made in a class) are perfectly sufficient for some things, also try to vary your revision a lot, I enjoy making summary posters (very visual) and flashcards to revise from, as rewriting the same notes over and over again is just pointless.

    As stated everyone is different, my method of summarising lectures and textbook information in note form then revising from posters, flashcards, revision videos etc. work wonders for me in first year and I (somehow - I have no idea how) pass in the top 20% of the year, it also seems to be a very common method!
    Thanks guys, will continue with this method and see how it goes in formative's!
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    (Original post by Zain-A)
    Thanks guys, will continue with this method and see how it goes in formative's!
    Hope it all goes well for you
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    (Original post by AnnekaChan173)
    Oh my, I can actually post here now! Been to my first 9am this morning

    First year, BSMS *
    Congratz!! I can imagin how it feels! I am just finishing my intro module for my first year, and finally qualified to post haha

    Good luck!!
    • #10
    #10

    hi guys, I’ve just started at med school and was wondering if anyone could give me some advice?!

    After results day I had major doubts about whether I wanted to do medicine + be a doctor etc. but I didn’t want to give it up with out even trying, so after a lot of deliberation I decided to go this year but apply for a different course at different unis for next year (as I can’t really afford to take a gap year if I end up not liking medicine).

    What do you guys think I should do re taking time off for admissions tests + possible interviews? Shall I just make up an excuse (I’ve looked and I think I have gp visits on the days I’ll have to miss, and possibly an exam which is typical haha) or shall I just be honest and tell them my situation? I’m just worried that if I tell them they might kick me out/treat me differently?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    hi guys, I’ve just started at med school and was wondering if anyone could give me some advice?!

    After results day I had major doubts about whether I wanted to do medicine + be a doctor etc. but I didn’t want to give it up with out even trying, so after a lot of deliberation I decided to go this year but apply for a different course at different unis for next year (as I can’t really afford to take a gap year if I end up not liking medicine).

    What do you guys think I should do re taking time off for admissions tests + possible interviews? Shall I just make up an excuse (I’ve looked and I think I have gp visits on the days I’ll have to miss, and possibly an exam which is typical haha) or shall I just be honest and tell them my situation? I’m just worried that if I tell them they might kick me out/treat me differently?
    This is a really difficult one, how has med school been treating you so far? and why do you have doubts that it may not be for you?

    In terms of the whole interview situation for exams it is a no go, so get that out of your mind now, you will just have to reschedule interviews around exams. For placements you have to remember that your placements are not funded by your £9000 tuition fee and they are pretty damn expensive (over £100 per go for a GP placement for a day) so I wouldnt reccomend missing them either.

    It really depends on my universities policy, if you really didnt want to tell them then you can always make up excuses, but be prepared to back them up and sometimes even provide evidence. Not sure how well it would go down if you told them the truth...
    • #10
    #10

    (Original post by Natalierm2707)
    This is a really difficult one, how has med school been treating you so far? and why do you have doubts that it may not be for you?

    In terms of the whole interview situation for exams it is a no go, so get that out of your mind now, you will just have to reschedule interviews around exams. For placements you have to remember that your placements are not funded by your £9000 tuition fee and they are pretty damn expensive (over £100 per go for a GP placement for a day) so I wouldnt reccomend missing them either.

    It really depends on my universities policy, if you really didnt want to tell them then you can always make up excuses, but be prepared to back them up and sometimes even provide evidence. Not sure how well it would go down if you told them the truth...
    It's been ok, I haven't really had any proper lectures yet so it's hard to tell if I'm going to enjoy it. I'm just worried about whether I'll enjoy the course content and job after it.

    Ah that's annoying. Thing is that one of the unis I'm applying to is Oxford and I don't think that they really reschedule interviews haha. Is there never any chance to reschedule either of these things? Sorry I have no idea about any of this so I don't know whether that's something that's like out of the question

    Do you think that something like that is something that they could kick you out for?

    Such an odd situation I know!!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    It's been ok, I haven't really had any proper lectures yet so it's hard to tell if I'm going to enjoy it. I'm just worried about whether I'll enjoy the course content and job after it.

    Ah that's annoying. Thing is that one of the unis I'm applying to is Oxford and I don't think that they really reschedule interviews haha. Is there never any chance to reschedule either of these things? Sorry I have no idea about any of this so I don't know whether that's something that's like out of the question

    Do you think that something like that is something that they could kick you out for?

    Such an odd situation I know!!
    Personally, I think if you've made the decision to study medicine, you need to give it a proper go. Its not really something you can just dip a toe in and decide if its right for you. Clinical medicine is very different to the first couple of years stuck in uni, and the job itself is nothing like being a medical student.

    You also don't want to risk jeopardising your shot at medicine, in case you find you do actually like it. Attendance is monitored and if you're missing too much without a good reason (I am not entirely sure medical schools will appreciate you applying elsewhere- they won't discipline you or anything but it won't reflect well should you struggle later on).

    Medicine is a bit of a beast, it does require a lot of your focus. If you're devoting too much time to making plans for next year, you may find yourself struggling to pass the exams and the decision will be made for you.

    Why is it you think medicine isn't for you? What would you want to study instead? Have you checked with your potential universities how they feel about you applying whilst already studying?

    tl;dr Give medicine a proper shot. You can't really know what it is like until you've given it a while. Don't shoot yourself in the foot too early... you might love medicine.
    • #10
    #10

    (Original post by ForestCat)
    Personally, I think if you've made the decision to study medicine, you need to give it a proper go. Its not really something you can just dip a toe in and decide if its right for you. Clinical medicine is very different to the first couple of years stuck in uni, and the job itself is nothing like being a medical student.

    You also don't want to risk jeopardising your shot at medicine, in case you find you do actually like it. Attendance is monitored and if you're missing too much without a good reason (I am not entirely sure medical schools will appreciate you applying elsewhere- they won't discipline you or anything but it won't reflect well should you struggle later on).

    Medicine is a bit of a beast, it does require a lot of your focus. If you're devoting too much time to making plans for next year, you may find yourself struggling to pass the exams and the decision will be made for you.

    Why is it you think medicine isn't for you? What would you want to study instead? Have you checked with your potential universities how they feel about you applying whilst already studying?

    tl;dr Give medicine a proper shot. You can't really know what it is like until you've given it a while. Don't shoot yourself in the foot too early... you might love medicine.
    I completely understand what you mean. It's just so annoying because in an ideal world I would give medicine a proper go, then if I didn't like it just move onto the next thing, but I just worry that I'll end up spending 5 years doing something I don't like?

    I'm applying for chemistry, which is quite different to medicine and has different jobs available at the end - so it's not like I could just continue with medicine and then just go into a job that I could get with chemistry. I have checked with the unis I'm applying for and they've all said that it doesn't matter.

    I think I might just go and see some of the advisors at uni, I've had a look and they're confidential so I'll see what they say before I start actually talking to anyone at the med school about it.

    Hopefully I end up loving medicine and don't need to worry about any of this! Thanks so much for your help.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    It's been ok, I haven't really had any proper lectures yet so it's hard to tell if I'm going to enjoy it. I'm just worried about whether I'll enjoy the course content and job after it.

    Ah that's annoying. Thing is that one of the unis I'm applying to is Oxford and I don't think that they really reschedule interviews haha. Is there never any chance to reschedule either of these things? Sorry I have no idea about any of this so I don't know whether that's something that's like out of the question

    Do you think that something like that is something that they could kick you out for?

    Such an odd situation I know!!
    Making the decision to study medicine, getting through the entrance exams and getting into med school is such a huge step in life, and something which required a lot of planning and deliberation, you knew you wanted to do medicine for a good while, why has that changed now all of a sudden?

    Medicine is something which you cant just have a few months in and know if its for you, It is a constantly changing career and throughout my time in year 1 of medical school I witnessed various specialities, areas of research, areas of clinical medicine as well as a huge variety of teaching and learning methods. You wont know whether medicine is for you based just on first year, and tbh once your in medicine its better just to stay in and continue the course.

    Also considering the huge amount of money the goverment pump into you in one year of medical school, I dont think the med school will take your lack of commitment to medicine lightly, especially considering how many people who dream of medicine you beat to get a place, it would kind of be a back hander if you understand me.
    • #7
    #7

    Any thoughts on the 'UKMLA' Exam likely to be introduced in 2019, and UK medical graduates as well as IMGs will have to pass before practising?

    http://www.gmc-uk.org/news/26549.asp
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    (Original post by Natalierm2707)

    Also considering the huge amount of money the goverment pump into you in one year of medical school, I dont think the med school will take your lack of commitment to medicine lightly, especially considering how many people who dream of medicine you beat to get a place, it would kind of be a back hander if you understand me.
    I don't think this is good advice. If medicine is not for you, you should be able to be open and honest with uni staff about it so you can good advice on where to go from here.
    Also the logic that you should complete a degree you dislike just because other people wanted a place is flawed. Similarly the fact that your course is expensive in year 1 so therefore you should complete all 5/6 years?? That doesn't make sense.

    It makes sense with your uncertainty to keep your options open. Find someone at uni you trust, be honest with them and be honest with yourself. Medicine is not for everyone. Good luck.
 
 
 
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