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    (Original post by ParadoxSocks)
    I think I'm going to start looking for graduate computing jobs now too. This past two weeks has really shown me that I'm working myself to death as a teacher and I don't know if I want that

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    Yep, im digging around for 2nd and 3rd line support roles so we will see what happens! I really dont want to go back next week
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    I have just started teaching a new class of set 2 (out of 3) year 8s and wow...they are so hard work. I've just had a double lesson with them and it was one of those lessons where you know it's going so badly and you just feel a mixture of embarrassment and total devastation! I have no idea how to control them. They will not listen to anything I say, they just talk through the whole lesson. My mentor tends to leave me alone with them to establish my authority but they don't see me as their teacher and don't listen to me at all. I'm at a total loss :/
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    Hi kpwxx

    Thanks again for the reply, I really appreciate the time and detail you are providing

    Yes, so last night I decided to rewrite my notes in a shorter version similar to what I would have done at school/uni and I think it'll def help. Nerves is my biggest fear, around children in a school is no problem to me, I love it and do feel I'm a natural with them but trying to get that across in an interview, well I panic!!!! 😕

    Oh well done on achiveving your teachers status 👍

    Is there any educational issues within primary that would be most beneficial to mention from a teachers point of view?

    Thanks for the advice and tips ☺️


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    How much teaching did people have to do at the start of their first school based training? I'm only 1 week into my BP1. I'm meant to start the assessed part of it after half term but the guide booklet that the school has received from the Uni lists specific percentages of teaching from the get go, rising to 60% by half term. I'm emailing my Uni for clarification but I'm wondering how it was for other people. I know things have to move quickly but I didn't think it was this quick!
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I have just started teaching a new class of set 2 (out of 3) year 8s and wow...they are so hard work. I've just had a double lesson with them and it was one of those lessons where you know it's going so badly and you just feel a mixture of embarrassment and total devastation! I have no idea how to control them. They will not listen to anything I say, they just talk through the whole lesson. My mentor tends to leave me alone with them to establish my authority but they don't see me as their teacher and don't listen to me at all. I'm at a total loss :/
    I've had classes like that, and all I can say is that with patience, consistency and persistence things do work out. The key is to try different techniques for low-level disruption until you find one they respond to well, and use the school behaviour policy for more persistent disruptors. I also find short detentions if you have break, lunch or the end of the day following your lesson to be very effective. I don't buy the whole go in ridiculously strict advice, as I feel it hampers my relationship with the class, but that can also be a way to go.
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    (Original post by Veggiechic6)
    How much teaching did people have to do at the start of their first school based training? I'm only 1 week into my BP1. I'm meant to start the assessed part of it after half term but the guide booklet that the school has received from the Uni lists specific percentages of teaching from the get go, rising to 60% by half term. I'm emailing my Uni for clarification but I'm wondering how it was for other people. I know things have to move quickly but I didn't think it was this quick!
    My first placement was 50% of an NQT timetable (so that was 10 hours per week). I had an observation week in which I didn't teach at all, then the following week taught all 10 lessons.

    In my 2nd placement, it was 14 hours per week (which meant I actually taught 17 lessons per week, as they were 50 minutes). Again, I had an observation week followed by teaching the full timetable.

    I know some people were in schools that did it more gradually though (building up to the full percentage, rather than going straight into it).
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    Omg, I'm so jealous. I have like nine weeks of placement left
    Don't want to turn this into a game of 'I have it worse' but I still have ten weeks left haha
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    (Original post by Veggiechic6)
    How much teaching did people have to do at the start of their first school based training? I'm only 1 week into my BP1. I'm meant to start the assessed part of it after half term but the guide booklet that the school has received from the Uni lists specific percentages of teaching from the get go, rising to 60% by half term. I'm emailing my Uni for clarification but I'm wondering how it was for other people. I know things have to move quickly but I didn't think it was this quick!
    I had to work up to 7-8 hours by the end of the placement. I built up quite slowly because I had little confidence. It depends on your mentor too. The uni might have a general guide of hours but it should be up to you and your mentor as to how fast you build those up.
    (Original post by tory88)
    I've had classes like that, and all I can say is that with patience, consistency and persistence things do work out. The key is to try different techniques for low-level disruption until you find one they respond to well, and use the school behaviour policy for more persistent disruptors. I also find short detentions if you have break, lunch or the end of the day following your lesson to be very effective. I don't buy the whole go in ridiculously strict advice, as I feel it hampers my relationship with the class, but that can also be a way to go.
    Yes, short detentions do work well, but I only have them before lunch for one lesson, and the rest of the time it is end of the day and I'm not allowed to keep them because of buses, which is really annoying! My mentor pretty much said what you said and told me to treat them as a test class and try something new each lesson until I find something they respond to. It does test my patience (and voice volume) though!

    (Original post by alabelle)
    Don't want to turn this into a game of 'I have it worse' but I still have ten weeks left haha
    Aww, well I may end up being with you on that one if I have to make up all my absences (which could potentially add three weeks on!!)
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I had to work up to 7-8 hours by the end of the placement. I built up quite slowly because I had little confidence. It depends on your mentor too. The uni might have a general guide of hours but it should be up to you and your mentor as to how fast you build those up.

    Yes, short detentions do work well, but I only have them before lunch for one lesson, and the rest of the time it is end of the day and I'm not allowed to keep them because of buses, which is really annoying! My mentor pretty much said what you said and told me to treat them as a test class and try something new each lesson until I find something they respond to. It does test my patience (and voice volume) though!



    Aww, well I may end up being with you on that one if I have to make up all my absences (which could potentially add three weeks on!!)
    With your voice, one of the best quick behaviour tips I've been given is, when you want to get attention cut UNDER lowering your voice, rather than getting higher and louder trying to cut over them.



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    (Original post by Veggiechic6)
    How much teaching did people have to do at the start of their first school based training? I'm only 1 week into my BP1. I'm meant to start the assessed part of it after half term but the guide booklet that the school has received from the Uni lists specific percentages of teaching from the get go, rising to 60% by half term. I'm emailing my Uni for clarification but I'm wondering how it was for other people. I know things have to move quickly but I didn't think it was this quick!
    In both placements I built up slowly. By the end of the first block (November, course started in September) I think I was teaching 10 hours? By the second block, which was just before Easter I think it was 15 and then the final block in summer was 20.

    Xxx

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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I have just started teaching a new class of set 2 (out of 3) year 8s and wow...they are so hard work. I've just had a double lesson with them and it was one of those lessons where you know it's going so badly and you just feel a mixture of embarrassment and total devastation! I have no idea how to control them. They will not listen to anything I say, they just talk through the whole lesson. My mentor tends to leave me alone with them to establish my authority but they don't see me as their teacher and don't listen to me at all. I'm at a total loss :/
    I'm an NQT and have a y8 class like that. I always have them period 5 on a Friday so it used to be a complete nightmare and we'd get nothing done.

    I started using raffle tickets with them - hand them out for good behaviour and following instructions and then have a bag of cheap stationery prizes/sometimes sweets. It really got to the naughty kids because other kids were getting prizes and they weren't. So they really started trying their hardest to get a raffle ticket and it has stopped all the low level disruption because everyone wants a raffle ticket.

    It's amazing - most of the stuff I have as prizes is like cheap rubbers, pens, packs of colouring pens, novelty stationery etc... Give it a try - they really responded to that rather than constant detentions etc.
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    (Original post by kpwxx)
    With your voice, one of the best quick behaviour tips I've been given is, when you want to get attention cut UNDER lowering your voice, rather than getting higher and louder trying to cut over them.



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    So you mean instead of raising my voice, I just ask for attention using my normal volume? I have no idea how that would work but I will try it. I'm sure they would just carry on talking. You're not the first person I've heard say that though, so I will try it out. Thanks for the advice.

    (Original post by outlaw-torn)
    I'm an NQT and have a y8 class like that. I always have them period 5 on a Friday so it used to be a complete nightmare and we'd get nothing done.

    I started using raffle tickets with them - hand them out for good behaviour and following instructions and then have a bag of cheap stationery prizes/sometimes sweets. It really got to the naughty kids because other kids were getting prizes and they weren't. So they really started trying their hardest to get a raffle ticket and it has stopped all the low level disruption because everyone wants a raffle ticket.

    It's amazing - most of the stuff I have as prizes is like cheap rubbers, pens, packs of colouring pens, novelty stationery etc... Give it a try - they really responded to that rather than constant detentions etc.
    I LOVE this idea. Definitely going shopping for prizes and raffle tickets this weekend! Definitely worth a try. I'll let you know how it goes thanks!
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    So you mean instead of raising my voice, I just ask for attention using my normal volume? I have no idea how that would work but I will try it. I'm sure they would just carry on talking. You're not the first person I've heard say that though, so I will try it out. Thanks for the advice.


    I LOVE this idea. Definitely going shopping for prizes and raffle tickets this weekend! Definitely worth a try. I'll let you know how it goes thanks!
    Tesco party bag toys - winners every time. I keep a box of them in a locked cupboard in my classroom. As a general rule, the older the kid, the more juvenile the toy. Speaking quietly is always a winner, btw. I also simply don't speak at all sometimes, just lean on the filing cabinet and drum my fingers. It takes no time at all for the good ones to start shushing the talkative. You could also work on the raised eyebrow. Less is more. If they see you shout, they know they've won.
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    Thanks for the feedback. I've checked the guidelines more closely and I'm supposed to teach up to 25% by half term, with 50% shared teaching and 25% observing. So it's not as harsh as I thought. There's another student on my course in the same class as me so we're sorting things between us.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    So you mean instead of raising my voice, I just ask for attention using my normal volume? I have no idea how that would work but I will try it. I'm sure they would just carry on talking. You're not the first person I've heard say that though, so I will try it out. Thanks for the advice.


    I LOVE this idea. Definitely going shopping for prizes and raffle tickets this weekend! Definitely worth a try. I'll let you know how it goes thanks!
    It's all a lot about pitch. If they're all noisy and you get louder and higher (which I tend to do) to try to speak over them, not only does it say that its OK to just shout louder over people (what you're asking them not to do) but you sound sort of panicked which makes them think they needn't bother listening.

    Whereas if you make your voice lower in pitch than normal it attracts their attention more for some reason. I guess it's something hard wired in to us to pay more attention to lower tones.

    Xxx

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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    So you mean instead of raising my voice, I just ask for attention using my normal volume? I have no idea how that would work but I will try it. I'm sure they would just carry on talking. You're not the first person I've heard say that though, so I will try it out. Thanks for the advice.


    I LOVE this idea. Definitely going shopping for prizes and raffle tickets this weekend! Definitely worth a try. I'll let you know how it goes thanks!
    Like Carnationlilyrose and Kpwxx have already said, it's all about your tone. Don't get louder, get lower or quieter or just stop talking and give the death glare, lol.

    Sounds silly, but I worked with a teacher with excellent class control who told me to literally walk around the house practising different tones of voice. Excellent advice. Have you had any sessions on use of voice at uni? I did school direct, so was hardly at university, but that was one very useful session !

    Also, stand in front of a mirror and perfect a raised eyebrow, wide eye glare, etc etc. See what looks scariest and use it. I've been told mine is terrifying.... I perhaps ought to tone it down a little actually... If I ask a child to explain their misbehaviour they just stare at me in terrified silence!
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    I think pitch is more important than volume, definitely.

    I have to admit to being a bit of a shouter. But it's not an angry/high pitched/losing-it shout, more of a low bellow.

    It's not something I'd use to try and get the whole class silent - standing and waiting, looking unimpressed, writing names on the board for detentions and rewards for those who are sitting properly waiting for you to speak, works much better. But if you've got a few idiots messing around while you're talking, and ruining it for everyone else, I find a sharp, low pitched shout in their direction, which makes your authority clear (ie: I am speaking now.) can be effective.

    I think it's also important that if you do shout, you don't continue doing it at length. I find it can be useful to shout briefly (and glare at the few who are misbehaving), then turn back, completely change your tone, smile, and continue giving your instructions to the class calmly and quietly. So they understand you're not shouting because you're angry, you're just making a point.

    I think it partly depends on your natural voice though. I've always been loud and also have quite a low-pitched voice for a woman.
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    (Original post by Airfairy)
    I have just started teaching a new class of set 2 (out of 3) year 8s and wow...they are so hard work. I've just had a double lesson with them and it was one of those lessons where you know it's going so badly and you just feel a mixture of embarrassment and total devastation! I have no idea how to control them. They will not listen to anything I say, they just talk through the whole lesson. My mentor tends to leave me alone with them to establish my authority but they don't see me as their teacher and don't listen to me at all. I'm at a total loss :/
    Behaviour management was something I really struggled with in the beginning but it's one of my best areas now.

    I would avoid shouting, I don't think it really works - shouting should be an absolute last resort.

    A few tricks:

    the bomb - so, once you've set a task, draw a bomb on the board with a fuse - explain to the pupils that if the noise level gets too loud, you will rub some of the fuse out. When the fuse ends and the bomb 'goes off' that means silent work for X amount of minutes - if someone talks during that time, the minutes will restart.

    For year 7 and 8 (I even do it with year 10!) 5,4,3,2,1 works really well. I don't ever get down to zero now because by 2, pupils are silent and ready to listen.

    Whole class detentions - simply having a minute added on to the board, they waste your time, you'll waste theirs!

    Warnings box - Depending on what your schools behaviour policy is, have a box on the board every lesson where you can just write down names (I use a seating plan to put names on the board rather than asking the boys to tell me) and then if their name goes on the board, that's a warning - if they get a tick next to their name, that's a strike. I don't tell them if I'm putting their name on the board and there's no arguments. It's a clear system.

    Class contracts can be quite useful.

    I get my classes to line up at before the lesson quietly and always have a 'do now' task on the board so when they come in, there's a task ready to do.

    My classes also know that I do not let them leave until the class is silent and standing behind their chairs.

    I also sometimes send the pupils back out if they come in to the classroom noisily.
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    Hello

    Long time reading here of this thread - it has been super useful!
    Just wondering if anyone can give me some advice please. I've been offered my first NQT interview and I'm very nervous. I have to teach a lesson for 30 minutes, I'm guessing they'll expect starter/explanation/activity/plenary set up even within this time?
    Any advice about interview lessons and general tips for the interview would be fantastic, as I really want to get this job xx
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    (Original post by JosephineE)
    Hello

    Long time reading here of this thread - it has been super useful!
    Just wondering if anyone can give me some advice please. I've been offered my first NQT interview and I'm very nervous. I have to teach a lesson for 30 minutes, I'm guessing they'll expect starter/explanation/activity/plenary set up even within this time?
    Any advice about interview lessons and general tips for the interview would be fantastic, as I really want to get this job xx
    Yeah they will expect you to use the usual format even if it is a short lesson. Some people also recommend telling them what else you would do to extend the lesson if it was longer, or possible next steps.

    Sorry I don't have much other advice to give, I've only had mock interviews so far. Apparently the questions are fairly generic - e.g. there will always be a safeguarding question, a 'what is an outstanding teacher' type question, etc.
 
 
 
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