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    'Ali reported that one day Allah's Messenger (ﷺ) was sitting with a wood in his hand and he was scratching the ground. He raised his head and said:

    There is not one amongst you who has not been allotted his seat in Paradise or Hell. They said: Allah's Messenger. then, why should we perform good deeds, why not depend upon our destiny? Thereupon he said. No, do perform good deeds, for everyone is facilitated in that for which he has been created; then he recited this verse:" Then, who gives to the needy and guards against evil and accepts the excellent (the truth of Islam and the path of righteousness it prescribes), We shall make easy for him the easy end..." (xcii. 5-10).

    Sahih Muslim 2647 c
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    Abu Huraira reported Allah's Messenger (ﷺ) as saying:

    The world is a prison-house for a believer and Paradise for a non-believer.

    Sahih Muslim 2956
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    (Original post by tau_neutrino)
    :gasp::gah:

    Whoah, will it be a proper eclipse like a complete blackout during the day? i've never seen one in my life

    Yes, a proper solar eclipse which will last from around 8:45 to 10:40
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    (Original post by Plantagenet Crown)
    Yes, a proper solar eclipse which will last from around 8:45 to 10:40
    Apparently it will only be visible in the faroe islands... :confused:

    Well that sucks.

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    http://www.theguardian.com/world/200...P=share_btn_fb
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    (Original post by HAnwar)


    Ok.
    But you can't compare him to the person who killed Ali (RA)...
    Though I see what you mean.
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    :yy:
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    A man asked al-Tustari (d. 283): "What is sustenance?" He said: "Perpetual dhikr." The man said: "I was not asking about that, but about what sustains one." He replied: "O man, things are sustained by nothing but Allah." The man said: "I did not mean that, I asked you about what is indispensable!" He replied: "Young man, Allah is indispensable."

    [Abu Nu`aym, Hilya al-Awliya']
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    Do not be discouraged to do good because of the bad that you know of yourself. Do not be discouraged to correct yourself because of the extent of the wrong that you may have done. The minuteness of the ant does not discourage it from lifting loads many times it's own weight in order to fulfil the task upon which it has embarked. The bird has no hands, yet it continues it's efforts to build the nest, one twig at a time, not giving up. Then surely Allah ta'ala blessed man with much more strength, with much more potential. Then surely Allah ta'ala is the Most Merciful, the Forbearing, the Oft-returning to forgiveness.
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    (Original post by ThatMuslimGuy)
    قَالَ رَسُولُ اللَّهِ صلى الله عليه وسلم ‏"‏ مَنْ قَاتَلَ تَحْتَ رَايَةٍ عُمِّيَّةٍ يَدْعُو إِلَى عَصَبِيَّةٍ أَوْ يَغْضَبُ لِعَصَبِيَّةٍ فَقُتِلَ فَقِتْلَةٌ جَاهِلِيَّةٌ

    The Messenger of Allah (ﷺ) said: Whoever fights for a cause that is not clear, advocating nationalism, getting angry for the sake of nationalism, and he is killed, then he has died a death of Jahiliyyah.

    Sunan an-Nasa'i 4114



    Lol. Reminds me of Pakistani independence day. We're in a war in the north west, fighting separatists in the south west, kashmir lost to India in the north east(where our brothere and sisters are oppressed), economy is rubbish, the average person struggles to get gas for cooking and also electricity, our economic powerhouse city is run by several mafia groups but yhhh let's celebrate the failed country from which we come from. I'm sure waving a couple of flags will solve all of this :woohoo:
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    Remember to read the quotes at the start of the thread, from time to time, peeps
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    A little story from the life of Imam Abu Hanifah رحمه الله :


    "One story describes his treatment of a woman who appeared at his store to sell a silk garment. She asked only a hundred dirhams for it, but Abu Hanifa would not buy it at that price, and told her it was worth more. The woman increased the sales price in increments of a hundred dirhams, but each time Abu Hanifa insisted that the silk garment was worth more. When she reached four hundred dirhams, the woman thought Abu Hanifa was mocking her, but an independent merchant was summoned to appraise the garment, and he valued it for five hundred dirhams."
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    (Original post by ash92:))
    Do not be discouraged to do good because of the bad that you know of yourself. Do not be discouraged to correct yourself because of the extent of the wrong that you may have done. The minuteness of the ant does not discourage it from lifting loads many times it's own weight in order to fulfil the task upon which it has embarked. The bird has no hands, yet it continues it's efforts to build the nest, one twig at a time, not giving up. Then surely Allah ta'ala blessed man with much more strength, with much more potential. Then surely Allah ta'ala is the Most Merciful, the Forbearing, the Oft-returning to forgiveness.
    I really like this. Where did you get it? I remember you posted this before, because I saved it on my notes
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    Arthur John Arberry wrote in the preface to his translation:

    "In choosing to call the present work The Koran Interpreted I have conceded the relevancy of the orthodox Muslim view, of which Pickthall, for one, was so conscious, that the Koran is untranslatable. Some of the implications of that doctrine are sketched out in the preface to my The Holy Koran: an Introduction with Selections (Allen & Unwin, 1955), and it is not proposed to repeat the same argument here. Briefly, the rhetoric and rhythm of the Arabic of the Koran are so characteristic, so powerful, so highly emotive, that any version whatsoever is bound in the nature of things to be but a poor copy of the glittering splendour of the original. Never was it more true than in this instance that traduttore traditore. My chief reason for offering this new version of a book which has been ‘translated’ many times already is that in no previous rendering has a serious attempt been made to imitate, however imperfectly, those rhetorical and rhythmical patterns which are the glory and the sublimity of the Koran. I am breaking new ground here; it may therefore be thought appropriate to explain in short my intentions and my method.

    (…)
    There is a repertory of familiar themes running through the whole Koran; each Sura elaborates or adumbrates one or more — often many — of these. Using the language of music, each Sura is a rhapsody composed of whole or fragmentary leitmotivs; the analogy is reinforced by the subtly varied rhythmical flow of the discourse. If this diagnosis of the literary structure of the Koran may be accepted as true — and it accords with what we know of the poetical instinct, indeed the whole aesthetic impulse, of the Arabs — it follows that those notorious incongruities and irrelevancies, even those ‘wearisome repetitions’, which have proved such stumbling-blocks in the way of our Western appreciation will vanish in the light of a clearer understanding of the nature of the Muslim scriptures. A new vista opens up; following this hitherto unsuspected and unexplored path, the eager interpreter hurries forward upon an exciting journey of discovery, and is impatient to report his findings to a largely indifferent and incredulous public.

    During the long months, the dark and light months, of labouring at this interpretation, eclectic where the ancient commentators differ in their understanding of a word or a phrase, unannotated because notes in plenty are to be found in other versions, and the radiant beauty of the original is not clouded by such vexing interpolations — all through this welcome task I have been reliving those Ramadan nights of long ago, when I would sit on the veranda of my Gezira house and listen entranced to the old, white-bearded Sheykh who chanted the Koran for the pious delectation of my neighbour. He had the misfortune, my neighbour, to be a prominent politician, and so in the fullness of his destiny, but not the fullness of his years, he fell to an assassin’s bullet; I like to think that the merit of those holy recitations may have eased the way for him into a world free of the tumult and turbulence that attended his earthly career. It was then that I, the infidel, learnt to understand and react to the thrilling rhythms of the Koran, only to be apprehended when listened to at such a time and in such a place. In humble thankfulness I dedicate this all too imperfect essay in imitation to the memory of those magical Egyptian nights."


    We further read in his preface to the second volume of this work:

    "This volume contains the second half of a new version of the Koran; it thus marks the completion of one phase of a labour which is in the nature of things unending. Over a period of many months the Koran has been my constant companion, the object of my most attentive study. Though many can certainly claim to have read the Koran, indeed over and over again, and to know it Well. I think it may be reasonably asserted that their understanding and appreciation of the book will always fall short of what may be attained by one who undertakes to translate it in full and with all possible fidelity. I had myself studied the Koran and perused it from end to end over many years, before I embarked upon making a version of it; assuredly the careful discipline of trying to find the best English equivalent for every meaning and every rhythm of the original Arabic has profoundly deepened my own penetration into the heart of the Koran, and has at the same time sharpened my awareness of its mysterious and compelling beauty. For this reason, if for no other, I think it is justifiable to adopt the unusual procedure of adding a separate preface to the second instalment of a two-volume work. I suppose I shall never again recapture the freshness and excitement of the experience just now completed; the passing months and years will inevitably blur the image; this is the moment, or never, to attempt to record the impact which a sustained and concentrated exploration of the Koran has left on my mind and my heart.

    (…)
    The mystic’s experience, attested as it is by a cloud of witnesses, surely provides the key to the mysterious inconsequence of the Koranic rhetoric. All truth was present simultaneously within the Prophet’s enraptured soul; all truth, however fragmented, revealed itself in his inspired utterance. The reader of the Muslim scriptures must strive to attain the same all-embracing apprehension. The sudden fluctuations of theme and mood will then no longer present such difficulties as have bewildered critics ambitious to measure the ocean of prophetic eloquence with the thimble of pedestrian analysis. Each Sura will now be seen to be a unity within itself, and the whole Koran will be recognised as a single revelation, self-consistent in the highest degree. Though half a mortal lifetime was needed for the message to be received and communicated, the message itself, being of the eternal, is one message in eternity, however heterogeneous its temporal expression may appear to be. This, the mystic’s approach, is surely the right approach to the study of the Koran; it is an approach that leads, not to bewilderment and disgust — that is the prerogative of the Higher Critic — but to an ever deepening understanding, to a wonder and a joy that have no end."
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    (Original post by HSafirah)
    I really like this. Where did you get it? I remember you posted this before, because I saved it on my notes
    I wrote it myself
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    (Original post by ash92:))
    I wrote it myself
    Awesome, you are talented iin writing stuff. :yy: Hope you don't mind that I saved it lol
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    (Original post by ash92:))
    For context, it seems English translation would be sufficient. Asbab al-Nuzool may be something along the lines of what you're looking for. I don't really know what to recommend tbh bro, as it would need to be a tafseer and need to be non-brief. See the tafseers of al-Jalalayn, Ibn Katheer (may Allah have mercy on them) and also the tafseer Ma'ariful Quran. The first is more brief.
    Thanks so much, both of you
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    (Original post by FlareBlitz96)
    Thanks so much, both of you
    no problem
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    (Original post by HSafirah)
    Awesome, you are talented iin writing stuff. :yy: Hope you don't mind that I saved it lol
    Taqabballallahu minee wa minkum (may Allah accept from me and you all)
    Of course not

    (Original post by FlareBlitz96)
    Thanks so much, both of you
    You're welcome
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    (Original post by ash92:))
    x
    Peace be with you brother, glad to see you on here. I'm not sure what power Ayatullah Khamanei has, i do know the president is elected (rouhani) and that there's even a Jewish member of parliament in Iran, etc.
 
 
 
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