Belly Fat Watch

Resu Eman
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#41
Report 9 years ago
#41
(Original post by AshMcD)
I don't need to try again my friend. Try consuming four hundred grams of saturated fat a day and losing fat.
I agree that you're not going to lose weight consuming over 3500 calories a day unlesws you are very big, exercise a lot or have trouble digesting food, but that doesn't seem particularly relevant.
(Original post by AshMcD)
Please, show me this peer reviewed research, I would be most interested to read it.
I mainly live on pizza and chocolate, yet I'm thin. I know plenty of thin people who (from what I've seen) eat mainly junk food. No research needed.
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j_owen90
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#42
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#42
Most 'naturally thin' people who eat mainly junk food actually don't eat as much as they appear to. For example I have a friend who is naturally very skinny and when I'm with her she'll eat a whole tube of pringles, loads of sweets, chocolate, pizza etc. But then she'll just forget to eat between breakfast and dinner, etc, so overall her calorie consumption keeps her thin.
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Brotherhood
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#43
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#43
(Original post by j_owen90)
Yes neccessarily, unless you ate 4000kcal of insoluble fibre, in which case you'd probably kill your intestine.

A calorie is a calorie. It drives me insane when people go on about certain foods making you gain (eg carbs) - it's. not. true. Anything will make you gain weight if you eat enough of it.

It's just easier to eat 4000kcal of fries than it is to eat oranges or whatever.
No, because nutrient timing, absorption, insulin sensitivity, cortisol levels, lean body mass and on and on and on will all have an effect on how your body uses what you put into it. Fat and carbs and protein are all different and are utilised in different ways. A calorie isn't just a calorie.
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mipegg
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#44
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#44
(Original post by Brotherhood)
No, because nutrient timing, absorption, insulin sensitivity, cortisol levels, lean body mass and on and on and on will all have an effect on how your body uses what you put into it. Fat and carbs and protein are all different and are utilised in different ways. A calorie isn't just a calorie.
Tried this earlier, apparently timings are 'a total myth'
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j_owen90
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#45
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#45
(Original post by Brotherhood)
No, because nutrient timing, absorption, insulin sensitivity, cortisol levels, lean body mass and on and on and on will all have an effect on how your body uses what you put into it. Fat and carbs and protein are all different and are utilised in different ways. A calorie isn't just a calorie.
After years of controlled diets administered for medical reasons, dieticians, doctors and the like, everything I've told suggests that a calorie is in fact a calorie. Yes, lean muscle mass plays into what your BMR would be, but regardless of that, if you eat 3500 calories over your burn you will gain a pound, and if you eat 3500 calories under, you will lose a pound. Simple as.

Carbs, protein and fat are indeed utilised in different ways, but if you aren't using those calories they all do the same thing. It doesn't matter WHEN you burn them or how you burn them, if you're burning them, you won't gain weight.
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Brotherhood
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#46
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#46
(Original post by j_owen90)
After years of controlled diets administered for medical reasons, dieticians, doctors and the like, everything I've told suggests that a calorie is in fact a calorie. Yes, lean muscle mass plays into what your BMR would be, but regardless of that, if you eat 3500 calories over your burn you will gain a pound, and if you eat 3500 calories under, you will lose a pound. Simple as.

Carbs, protein and fat are indeed utilised in different ways, but if you aren't using those calories they all do the same thing. It doesn't matter WHEN you burn them or how you burn them, if you're burning them, you won't gain weight.
So you're saying someone eating an extra lb's worth of calories from a balanced diet and another the same from cake are going to be the same?
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AntiClock
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#47
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#47
(Original post by Diaz89)
besides the usual answers, I've found that running really helps
This is a bit off topic, but your sig is so huge I had to ad block it.
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j_owen90
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#48
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#48
(Original post by Brotherhood)
So you're saying someone eating an extra lb's worth of calories from a balanced diet and another the same from cake are going to be the same?
Yes. But they'd probably feel a lot more full and uncomfortable having over eaten with the balanced, healthy meals because they'd have consumed a large quantity of food (in terms of sheer size) so would be less likely to do it. However, someone could eat many calories worth of cake and still have plenty of room for more! But calorie for calorie, eat the same, gain the same.

I'd also be interested to know what is in Cytoplex other than protein.

When I ate a very low calorie diet, I lost more weight when I drank a ridiculous amount of caffeine a day than I did when I drank no caffeine. Just a thought.
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ch0c0h01ic
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#49
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#49
(Original post by j_owen90)
Yes. But they'd probably feel a lot more full and uncomfortable having over eaten with the balanced, healthy meals because they'd have consumed a large quantity of food (in terms of sheer size) so would be less likely to do it. However, someone could eat many calories worth of cake and still have plenty of room for more! But calorie for calorie, eat the same, gain the same.
No. Some further reading.
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j_owen90
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#50
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#50
Simply counting calories will not lead to bodyfat loss. Knowing that the heat liberated from a particular food, whether it is fat, protein, or carbohydrate is determined by its particular molecular structure, and that this structure determines its thermogenic effect

Agreed, yes - but it doesn't change the fact that if you're eating more calories than your body can use, you're going to gain weight. And if you're starving to death on an island, it will make no difference whatsoever if someone gave you a lifetime supply of skinless, lean chicken breasts or a lifetime supply of McDonald's milkshakes. If you ate three times as many chicken breasts as milkshakes you'll gain the same amount, you'd just have to eat more.

If you're eating a balanced diet, you won't crave crap. If you're eating crap, you're deficient in loads of things that mean your BMR might drop due to muscle wastage. In that case, you would require less calories as muscle metabolises faster than fat.

What that website described was a rather complex way of differentiating between high and low GI foods - eat a slice of brown bread, stay full for 30 minutes, eat a slice of white, stay full for 10. But you'll then go and eat more after the 10.
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ch0c0h01ic
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#51
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#51
(Original post by j_owen90)
Agreed, yes - but it doesn't change the fact that if you're eating more calories than your body can use, you're going to gain weight. And if you're starving to death on an island, it will make no difference whatsoever if someone gave you a lifetime supply of skinless, lean chicken breasts or a lifetime supply of McDonald's milkshakes. If you ate three times as many chicken breasts as milkshakes you'll gain the same amount, you'd just have to eat more.
Yes but what you eat influences what type of body tissue you gain or lose.

In terms of weight gain...

Gorge yourself on carbs and all you're going to gain is fat. Consume a decent diet and you stand to gain muscle which is far more beneficial and far healthier.

In terms of weight loss...

Consume a poor diet, yes, you will lose weight, but a much larger proportion of that will be muscle than on a decent diet where the majority will be fat. Again, it is much more beneficial to consume a decent diet as opposed to a poor one.

Also there is the issue of ketogenesis. Consume a diet low in carbs and across a short time frame the individual will lose more fat than on a conventional diet.
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j_owen90
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#52
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#52
(Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
Yes but what you eat influences what type of body tissue you gain or lose.

In terms of weight gain...

Gorge yourself on carbs and all you're going to gain is fat. Consume a decent diet and you stand to gain muscle which is far more beneficial and far healthier.

In terms of weight loss...

Consume a poor diet, yes, you will lose weight, but a much larger proportion of that will be muscle than on a decent diet where the majority will be fat. Again, it is much more beneficial to consume a decent diet as opposed to a poor one.

Also there is the issue of ketogenesis. Consume a diet low in carbs and across a short time frame the individual will lose more fat than on a conventional diet.
That's really interesting - see I'd never thought much about it in terms of *what* you lose - I suppose because I've had an eating disorder for a number of years and have seen endless dieticians and hospitals and whatnot but it's been very focused on 'the number on the scales' rather than body fat percentage, muscle etc.
Having said that,when I go to the gym I make sure to eat a good amount of protein within half an hour of working out to repair muscle damage etc.

I do genuinely believe the Atkins is EVIL - I know disordered people take things to extremes but I've seen girls literally keel over because they've denied their bodies carbohydrate for extended periods of time. It's horrible. (Plus ketosis = smelly breath!)

I always lost weight through calorie counting, and am working on gaining weight at the moment through calorie counting. Have you ever heard of hypometabolism? (or hypermetabolism? Poor spelling!) Basically when someone has been malnourished and begins gaining weight the body has vastly increased metabolic requirements because of all the damage that has been done internally, and begins burning like crazy. Despite the fact I *should* be gaining weight at the moment on 2200, I'm needing in excess of 3000 a day to gain half a pound a week. Nightmare!
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ch0c0h01ic
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#53
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#53
(Original post by j_owen90)
I do genuinely believe the Atkins is EVIL - I know disordered people take things to extremes but I've seen girls literally keel over because they've denied their bodies carbohydrate for extended periods of time. It's horrible. (Plus ketosis = smelly breath!)
I agree, the Atkins diet isn't good, it recommends food high in saturated fat, but on the whole ketogenic (and low carbohydrate) diets followed properly, by healthy people, etc, have little or no negative side effects.

(Original post by j_owen90)
I always lost weight through calorie counting, and am working on gaining weight at the moment through calorie counting.
A lot of people wrongly do. People should focus on better gauges like how their clothes fit, fitness levels, bodyfat percentages, etc.
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j_owen90
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#54
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#54
(Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
I agree, the Atkins diet isn't good, it recommends food high in saturated fat, but on the whole ketogenic (and low carbohydrate) diets followed properly, by healthy people, etc, have little or no negative side effects.



A lot of people wrongly do. People should focus on better gauges like how their clothes fit, fitness levels, bodyfat percentages, etc.
Indeed. I definitely advocate 'healthy lifestyle' over 'diet,' but when it comes down to the out-and-out 'lose weight full stop,' disregarding HOW you want to lose the weight or increase your fitness etc, I still think it's calories in vs. calories out. I don't want to say 'it worked for me' because ending up in hospital doesn't exactly come under most people's idea of 'working' - but then at the time I was *terrified* of becoming 'muscly' too.

So as someone who is now trying to gain weight and increase fitness at the same time (strength training + light cardio, 3X a week) - would you reccommend focusing on protein? I always worry slightly that I need to move away from analysing my diet too closely - I don't want to trade calorie counting for getting a *perfect* ratio.
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ch0c0h01ic
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#55
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#55
(Original post by j_owen90)
Indeed. I definitely advocate 'healthy lifestyle' over 'diet,' but when it comes down to the out-and-out 'lose weight full stop,' disregarding HOW you want to lose the weight or increase your fitness etc, I still think it's calories in vs. calories out. I don't want to say 'it worked for me' because ending up in hospital doesn't exactly come under most people's idea of 'working' - but then at the time I was *terrified* of becoming 'muscly' too.
Sure if you just want to lose weight it's about calories, then again we've already established that for the vast majority of people it isn't a step forward, in fact it can be a step backward (ie; someone losing weight on a poor diet will lose a lot of muscle and very little fat potentially making them appear even fatter than they were before).

(Original post by j_owen90)
So as someone who is now trying to gain weight and increase fitness at the same time (strength training + light cardio, 3X a week) - would you reccommend focusing on protein? I always worry slightly that I need to move away from analysing my diet too closely - I don't want to trade calorie counting for getting a *perfect* ratio.
Just eat healthily, focus on getting 3 decent meals down your neck and 2-3 decent snacks.

In terms of meals get a plate and divide it into four:
- One quarter should be a decent source of protein (ie; chicken, tuna, beef, beans, etc)
- One quarter should be a decent source of carbs (ie; brown rice, wholewheat pasta, sweet potato, lentils, beans, etc)
- Two quarters should be vegetables

As for snacks look at a handful of nuts/seeds and maybe some fruit, or a yoghurt and some fruit, a protein shake and some fruit, etc.

When you've got a decent diet then tailor your portion sizes to gain/maintain/lose weight. So if you want to gain weight but aren't, increase your portion sizes slightly until you do, and vice versa.
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j_owen90
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#56
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#56
(Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
Sure if you just want to lose weight it's about calories, then again we've already established that for the vast majority of people it isn't a step forward, in fact it can be a step backward (ie; someone losing weight on a poor diet will lose a lot of muscle and very little fat potentially making them appear even fatter than they were before).



Just eat healthily, focus on getting 3 decent meals down your neck and 2-3 decent snacks.

In terms of meals get a plate and divide it into four:
- One quarter should be a decent source of protein (ie; chicken, tuna, beef, beans, etc)
- One quarter should be a decent source of carbs (ie; brown rice, wholewheat pasta, sweet potato, lentils, beans, etc)
- Two quarters should be vegetables

As for snacks look at a handful of nuts/seeds and maybe some fruit, or a yoghurt and some fruit, a protein shake and some fruit, etc.

When you've got a decent diet then tailor your portion sizes to gain/maintain/lose weight. So if you want to gain weight but aren't, increase your portion sizes slightly until you do, and vice versa.
Thank you, that's very helpful. At the moment I eat three fairly huge meals a day + 3 snacks. All contain carbs, protein, fruit/veg and a small amount of (healthy) fat. Sometimes I just chug an Ensure for a snack if I can't be bothered to eat any more... At the moment if I eat less than 3000 I lose a shed load of weight which I obviously can't afford to do with uni right around the corner. Grr.
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indiebell
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#57
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#57
I tries the grapefruit diet and it reallly worked. TBH I think it works as a laxative and i felt kind pudgy again when I came off it so now I just eat whatever I want and half a grapefruit before each meal. Most of the fat tummy is probably just poo lol
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