High Intensity Interval Training... Watch

ch0c0h01ic
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#41
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#41
(Original post by alex0723)
It is what I have learnt from other runners and from personal experience!!!
You are mistaken.

It is ironic that you say that steady state is highly beneficial (more so than HIIT) yet you and your mates do more HIIT sessions than steady state.

(Original post by Revenged)
Where did you get that idea from?

Sprint intervals - HIIT - is pure anaerobic training. Aerobic fitness is only increased by running fast for periods over 2 minutes. Typically for aerobic intervals the effort is between 2-5 mins.
Effects of moderate-intensity endurance and high-intensity intermittent training on anaerobic capacity and VO2max.

Tabata I, Nishimura K, Kouzaki M, Hirai Y, Ogita F, Miyachi M, Yamamoto K.

Department of Physiology and Biomechanics, National Institute of Fitness and Sports, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan.

This study consists of two training experiments using a mechanically braked cycle ergometer. First, the effect of 6 wk of moderate-intensity endurance training (intensity: 70% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), 60 min.d-1, 5 d.wk-1) on the anaerobic capacity (the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit) and VO2max was evaluated. After the training, the anaerobic capacity did not increase significantly (P > 0.10), while VO2max increased from 53 +/- 5 ml.kg-1 min-1 to 58 +/- 3 ml.kg-1.min-1 (P < 0.01) (mean +/- SD). Second, to quantify the effect of high-intensity intermittent training on energy release, seven subjects performed an intermittent training exercise 5 d.wk-1 for 6 wk. The exhaustive intermittent training consisted of seven to eight sets of 20-s exercise at an intensity of about 170% of VO2max with a 10-s rest between each bout. After the training period, VO2max increased by 7 ml.kg-1.min-1, while the anaerobic capacity increased by 28%. In conclusion, this study showed that moderate-intensity aerobic training that improves the maximal aerobic power does not change anaerobic capacity and that adequate high-intensity intermittent training may improve both anaerobic and aerobic energy supplying systems significantly, probably through imposing intensive stimuli on both systems.
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Kash:)
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#42
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#42
HIIT 6 times a week is too much. If you can manage that then you need to really push yourself and up the intensity.

I would suggest HIIT every other day.

-warm up
-10-30 seconds high intensity (depending how fit you are atm)
-then for the remaining time left in the minute, rest or low intensity
- repeat for 15 minutes, so do 15 reps.
-cool down

You should be really worn out, so you will need a rest day.

Also, if you want to keep it up etc. Find something that you enjoy, and mix things up etc.
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Revenged
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#43
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#43
In conclusion, this study showed that moderate-intensity aerobic training that improves the maximal aerobic power does not change anaerobic capacity and that adequate high-intensity intermittent training may improve both anaerobic and aerobic energy supplying systems significantly, probably through imposing intensive stimuli on both systems.
It doesn't sound convincing.

Whatever constitues 'ideal running' is irrelevant to most. It is hard to get into running and you sort of have to start with steady running for quite a long time whilst you increase up to a decent mileage. Once you have a decent mileage, and want to achieve the most out of it, you can do some structured training.

For starters, 1 hour runs at 70% VO2 max are runs I'd never do. My steady runs are once a week long run would be (1h15-1h45) or recovery runs have to be short (never more than 40 mins). Aerobic intervals are what make the backbone of my training. You need these if you want to results. I do 2/3 sessions a week of these. Anaerobic (HIIT) sprint intervals/hill repeats I've only started these once a week. They are quite advanced training for running. If you do sprint intervals / hill repeats without all the other training it's like trying to build a house with out foundations. Won't do much good.

Whatever you chose to do, chose a mixture, one form of any type training is ineffective long term as it only trains you for one thing !
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Revenged
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#44
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(Original post by alex0723)
I run with lots of the GB guys on a Sunday and they go for 90 minutes at a very steady pace.
GB guys only train 90 mins for a long run ? :confused:
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alex0723
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#45
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#45
(Original post by Revenged)
GB guys only train 90 mins for a long run ? :confused:
Yea a few of them do 1:45 but most of them finish after 90 minutes on a Sunday
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Kash:)
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#46
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#46
(Original post by alex0723)
Yea a few of them do 1:45 but most of them finish after 90 minutes on a Sunday
What are they trainiing for?
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white_haired_wizard
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#47
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HIIT is something I do twice a week. I really couldn't imagine doing this for more than this per week. My HIIT sessions, lasting between 20-30mins, are very effective, no pissing around with low-intensity exercise. I do HIIT twice a week, on a bike, and for stamina/fun/relaxation, I go swimming once a week, for about 50mins - doing about 1 mile.

6 HIIT per week seems insane.
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alex0723
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#48
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#48
(Original post by Kash:))
What are they trainiing for?
Some of them the world cross country championships and others have the Olympics in mind...
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Juicy Fruit
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#49
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#49
Right so what I need to be doing is substituting some of my weekly HIIT sessions with steady cardio, say at at least 10 km/h?

Could someone please tell me what would be the most effective use of my time at the gym then?

Currently I am going about 6 days a week, and the least I aim to do in a day is 30 mins of HIIT - 1 min 6 km/h, 1 min 14 km/h, on a 1% incline. Then 20 mins of rowing machine on 10 and an interval programme on the cross trainer for 10 mins. Then I will do ab exercises, press-ups, plank and that sort of stuff. And as often as I can which does seem to vary I will do a plyometric circuits class, sometimes once a week, sometimes three. I estimate that I am eating about 1500 - 1600 calories a day. I have gained muscle mass but stayed the same weight pretty much.

What should I be aiming to do each day?
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white_haired_wizard
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#50
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(Original post by Juicy Fruit)
Right so what I need to be doing is substituting some of my weekly HIIT sessions with steady cardio, say at at least 10 km/h?

Could someone please tell me what would be the most effective use of my time at the gym then?

Currently I am going about 6 days a week, and the least I aim to do in a day is 30 mins of HIIT - 1 min 6 km/h, 1 min 14 km/h, on a 1% incline. Then 20 mins of rowing machine on 10 and an interval programme on the cross trainer for 10 mins. Then I will do ab exercises, press-ups, plank and that sort of stuff. And as often as I can which does seem to vary I will do a plyometric circuits class, sometimes once a week, sometimes three. I estimate that I am eating about 1500 - 1600 calories a day. I have gained muscle mass but stayed the same weight pretty much.

What should I be aiming to do each day?
Eat more for heavens sake. You must be burning 500-600 calories in that 1hr cardio session of yours. Crazy. You're going to get ill if you're not careful. Eat more, allow yourself rest days.
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Revenged
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#51
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(Original post by Juicy Fruit)
What should I be aiming to do each day?
Did you even read the thread?

What you are doing is retarded, we told you nicely in three pages, but yet you still seem confused as to why it is not working.
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ch0c0h01ic
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#52
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#52
(Original post by Juicy Fruit)
Could someone please tell me what would be the most effective use of my time at the gym then?
HIIT if it's done properly.

(Original post by Juicy Fruit)
Currently I am going about 6 days a week, and the least I aim to do in a day is 30 mins of HIIT - 1 min 6 km/h, 1 min 14 km/h, on a 1% incline. Then 20 mins of rowing machine on 10 and an interval programme on the cross trainer for 10 mins.
That isn't HIIT in any way shape or form.

When we say HIIT we mean a workout should last 10-30 mins MAX, 2-3 times per week MAX. In someone who is relatively unfit we're realistically looking at 2-3 workouts of 10-15mins.

Now you're training pretty much every day of the week and you're doing so for 1+ hours. What does that tell us/you? You're not working at a high enough intensity. If you were genuinely working towards your maximum intensity you would not be able to sustain a workout for anywhere near that long, let alone 6 days in a row.

(Original post by Juicy Fruit)
What should I be aiming to do each day?
1-3 Weight training sessions = full body workout, free weights, compound movements, 30-60mins

1-3 HIIT sessions = 10-15 mins

If you're training hard you should be looking at perhaps 3 weight training sessions per week and 1 HIIT, or 2 weight and 2 HIIT. The emphasis is on quality and not quantity.

Eat well and you'll get what you want. Fudge around, ignore people's advice, think that you know better, whatever, progress is going to be slower if it happens at all.
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Revenged
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#53
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i wouldnt bother. this is someone who ignores all advice and continues to starve themselves whilst carrying on with a ridiculous exercise plan. not going to suddenly start listening to advice.
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Juicy Fruit
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#54
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#54
I asked for advice on how to do HIIT properly, not to be judged and insulted. I am not starving myself, I have increased my intake of calories since I have started exercising regularly. If I was eating 3 chocolate bars a day equalling 1500 calories, then yes, I would probably feel starving. But as it happens, I eat a large enough physical quantity of food to not feel hungry, I just make sure it is low calorie, and not loaded with sugar that is going to make me crash and crave more sugar. I am just afraid to eat more because it seems like it will counteract the exercise and it would be an actual effort to eat more, so if it is actually necessary for me to burn fat then yes I will but if it isn't and the only reason you think I should eat more is because you mistakenly believe that I am forcing myself to be hungry most of the time then I don't see the benefit of doing it.

Also, I am working very hard at the gym every time I go. But, I am heeding your advice and I will shorten and intensify my HIIT sessions in future and vary my workouts. I have started incorporating fixed weights as of a week ago and today I did a 45 minute run at 10 km/h and 15 mins on the rowing machine as you all said I should be doing cardio aswell as HIIT.

What sort of speed do I need to do in the rest minute and the sprint minute to be doing HIIT effectively?

I wouldn't class myself as relatively unfit anymore, I have been doing this for 2 months and my body responds very quickly to exercise, I am much fitter now.

Thank you
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ch0c0h01ic
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#55
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(Original post by Juicy Fruit)
What sort of speed do I need to do in the rest minute and the sprint minute to be doing HIIT effectively?
Speed varies from person to person, it's impossible to give an exact figure. The best guide is simply working as hard as you can for the allotted work interval. If that means working at 10kmh, run at 10kmh, or 20kmh, run at 20kmh - it's going to require a bit of trial and error and none of us can really dictate what it's going to be. Naturally if the interval is quite long then you're going to need to pace yourself to a degree rather than just an all out 100m sprint pace.

The same goes for the rest interval, you need to find a speed that allows you to at least partially recover but at the same time pushes you. Now this could be something as little as a walk or light job, or if you're really fit, a run.

(Original post by Juicy Fruit)
I wouldn't class myself as relatively unfit anymore, I have been doing this for 2 months and my body responds very quickly to exercise, I am much fitter now.
2 months is relatively little in the grand scheme of things, you may feel fitter but you are by no means 'fit'.
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alex0723
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#56
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#56
(Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
You are mistaken.

It is ironic that you say that steady state is highly beneficial (more so than HIIT) yet you and your mates do more HIIT sessions than steady state.
Since when did I say that???
I do 2 HIIT sessions a week and 4 steady state runs and it seems to be working well for me!! You going little from doing more than 3 HIIT sessions a week as you have to give your body time to recover in between or else you simply arent working at the level you need to in order to gain some benefit from whatever session you are doing
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so.sofie
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#57
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#57
(Original post by Juicy Fruit)
I've started exercising again recently and I just wanted to ask your opinions on whether my routine is going to give me decent results:

Every day, 30 minutes of HIIT - alternating one minute 12.5 km/h, one minute 5 km/h (to be increased as my fitness levels improve)...

Also, 20 minutes of rowing machine and 10 minutes on the cross trainer.

Thanks.
when doing any type of interval training, you shouldn't keep your rest time the same as your exercise time. To maximise your intervals, you should do 4 minutes 12 km/h x 2-3 minutes 7.5 km/h
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