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    (Original post by zero zero one)
    OP, have you tried looking at other ways of getting into psychiatry than doing a full on 5 year medical degree and then even further years of training to eventually become a Psychiatrist? If it's mental health you're interested in, I'm sure you could go along the Clinical Psychology route?

    Not to try to put you off medicine, it's just could you see yourself attending hours upon hours of lectures and learning copious amounts of stuff on the digestive system, muscles etc. if what you really want is to learn psychiatry stuff?

    Good luck with whatever you choose!
    It's pretty much the same route for Clinical Psychology anyway :sadnod: But I do love Biology as well as Psychology though.
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    (Original post by Awesome-o)
    Why do you need to have dissected to become a doctor?
    Surely it's the best way to learn about anatomy? I'm not even at vet school yet and I've dissected a dog (after they'd finished the post-mortem, they let me play around!). Looking at pictures and reading about it in books is no substitute for hands on experience, in my opinion. The fact that you'd be qualified to operate on a living human having never dissected a cadaver scares me slightly.

    (Original post by Rexel)
    You'd be surprised at how many medical students don't even know which side of the body the liver is on.
    Oh, and this is another good reason :yep:
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    (Original post by Rexel)
    I don't even do medicine and I've dissected the full human body and head.
    Do I even want to know why?
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    (Original post by Evanesyne)
    I'd love to do a medicine degree, but I really, really do not want to do human dissections. I've always avoided watching dissection videos at school, avoided the trip to the Body World, but it seems that if I want to do a medicine degree I can't avoid dissections?
    The weird thing is that I'm absolutely fine with animal/organ dissections....just not human bodies.


    So is it possible to avoid it?


    P.S. I'm not looking to become a doctor, but a Psychiatrist. Although I doubt that would make any difference at all.
    there's quite a bit of dissection on my course, but i can tell you it's easy to pass the anatomy exams without doing any dissection yourself. you can learn all the theory and just observe as others dissect, and then study prosections. the exams don't require you to conduct any dissection yourself.

    having said that, it's my favourite part of the course. you might even enjoy if you try. it's the only thing that keeps me interested in medicine at the moment!
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    (Original post by Evanesyne)
    Do I even want to know why?
    Biomedical Science. :p:
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    (Original post by Evanesyne)
    I'd love to do a medicine degree, but I really, really do not want to do human dissections. I've always avoided watching dissection videos at school, avoided the trip to the Body World, but it seems that if I want to do a medicine degree I can't avoid dissections?
    The weird thing is that I'm absolutely fine with animal/organ dissections....just not human bodies.


    So is it possible to avoid it?


    P.S. I'm not looking to become a doctor, but a Psychiatrist. Although I doubt that would make any difference at all.
    Not all med schools do dissections
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    (Original post by Rexel)
    Biomedical Science.
    :huff: Damn, no mass homicides then?
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    (Original post by Evanesyne)
    :huff: Damn, no mass homicides then?
    Unfortunately, no. :woo:
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    (Original post by Rexel)
    You'd be surprised at how many medical students don't even know which side of the body the liver is on.
    How many exactly? :rolleyes:

    That sounds a bit overexaggerated to me. And tbh you don't need to have done dissection to know which side its on so your point about being worried that people can graduate as doctors having never dissected a human cadaver etc is quite clearly invalid. Just flick through any decent anatomy book and you'll find it.
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    (Original post by Alfresco)
    How many exactly? :rolleyes:

    That sounds a bit overexaggerated to me. And tbh you don't need to have done dissection to know which side its on so your point about being worried that people can graduate as doctors having never dissected a human cadaver etc is quite clearly invalid. Just flick through any decent anatomy book and you'll find it.
    It was an example, and sorry I didn't count the number of people. :cool:
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    watch the movies 'Pathology', you will then love doing human dissections!
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    (Original post by Rexel)
    It was an example, and sorry I didn't count the number of people. :cool:
    :rofl:

    Well, who's fault is that! :p:

    Good answer!
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    You mean cadavers right? Because most medics I know don't actually go round slicing humans open. There's little difference between a human and a cadaver I know. But it's the crucial difference between cutting a cold, dead body open and cutting open somebody who's still alive and squirming around making it hard for you to slice them open. Not that I have any experience of that :ninja:
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    (Original post by Scrubby)
    You mean cadavers right? Because most medics I know don't actually go round slicing humans open. There's little difference between a human and a cadaver I know. But it's the crucial difference between cutting a cold, dead body open and cutting open somebody who's still alive and squirming around making it hard for you to slice them open. Not that I have any experience of that
    Lol, hopefully not.
    But no, I don't think I'd be that comfortable dissecting humans, dead or alive. Perhaps more so with cadavers though.
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    Dissecting a cadaver has little or no relevency to performing surgery/procedures on people.
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    (Original post by steph_v)
    Surely it's the best way to learn about anatomy? I'm not even at vet school yet and I've dissected a dog (after they'd finished the post-mortem, they let me play around!). Looking at pictures and reading about it in books is no substitute for hands on experience, in my opinion. The fact that you'd be qualified to operate on a living human having never dissected a cadaver scares me slightly.



    Oh, and this is another good reason :yep:
    I assure you all human dissection teaches you is to button a lab coat.

    Prosections are much more useful for learning anatomy.
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    (Original post by Awesome-o)
    Dissecting a cadaver has little or no relevency to performing surgery/procedures on people.
    Precisely why more medics should grab a fresh, live human and practise on them. :shifty:
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    [QUOTE=steph_v]Surely it's the best way to learn about anatomy? I'm not even at vet school yet and I've dissected a dog (after they'd finished the post-mortem, they let me play around!). Looking at pictures and reading about it in books is no substitute for hands on experience, in my opinion. The fact that you'd be qualified to operate on a living human having never dissected a cadaver scares me slightly.


    i dont know about you lol but it would scare me far more that you would apply skills learned to dissect a cadaver on a real 'uman!

    'please, doc, dont dissect me wif yor skills you learned in 1st year!!'

    though i expect dogs dont really get that choice so you are safe, macca. good for learning anatomy, tough, no doubt about it, but so are plenty of meffods.
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    (Original post by Evanesyne)
    X
    Either get used to it (which you may well do in medical school), or become a psychologist
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    There are quite a few places that teach medicine degrees as a problem based learning course. with these you don't do any human body dissections. i can think of liverpool and manchester off the top of my head that do these courses =]
 
 
 
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