Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

So....who should pay for uni? Watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AshleyT)
    Yes, because we should all pay for our parents mistakes and be poor because our parents are poor.

    You statement makes no sense as you are basically saying 'poor should stay poor and blame the poor'.
    I trust you have been earning your keep from the age of 5, then, and not living on your parents and their mistakes.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    we should pay but we should not be paying £6-9k a year. It is far too expensive. Most people are against the raise in tuition fees and not actually having fees. The government should be contributing towards education. This is good for the country as a whole. The should be supporting education for those who want to go to university and those who want to learn a trade. Its not about socialism or conservatism its about ensuring that university fees are fair.
    If these changes go through then students should be guaranteed at least 20 contact hours a week and teaching quality should be regulated.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KingofSpades)
    I trust you have been earning your keep from the age of 5, then, and not living on your parents and their mistakes.
    I was foster cared from ages 6-9, alcoholic Dad and mother having a nervous breakdown and all that. When i returned home, i was there to support my mothers mental health.

    I have about 25 cousins, a massive family. No-one's gone to University or done anything particually amazing.

    But now i'm in University. I probably wouldnt be here if tuition fees rose. Most likely would have got a job to save up, but still would have had to move out of home because i couldnt handle it anymore.

    So it would have taken a few years to get to where i am now.

    The point is, inspite of coming from a poor family, when i'll leave Edinburgh Uni, i'll have a great degree and even if there's no great jobs around, i can start my own **** and work from home. I've broken the cycle and hope to do something great in life.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AshleyT)
    I was foster cared from ages 6-9, alcoholic Dad and mother having a nervous breakdown and all that. When i returned home, i was there to support my mothers mental health.

    I have about 25 cousins, a massive family. No-one's gone to University or done anything particually amazing.

    But now i'm in University. I probably wouldnt be here if tuition fees rose. Most likely would have got a job to save up, but still would have had to move out of home because i couldnt handle it anymore.

    So it would have taken a few years to get to where i am now.

    The point is, inspite of coming from a poor family, when i'll leave Edinburgh Uni, i'll have a great degree and even if there's no great jobs around, i can start my own **** and work from home. I've broken the cycle and hope to do something great in life.
    but "the government" would still have subsidized your degree, so it would have been your call whether you went or did not.

    is getting a job inferior to uni, and can one not do something great without a degree?

    At what point did Cameron say, poor people cannot go to uni
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by charcharchar)
    The government should subsidise some of the cost, where do they think we're going to get the money from to pay for uni?

    The end result will be less and less people going to uni and instead going straight into jobs/volunteer work.. which will inevitably lead to many becoming unemployed due to the high demand for jobs and the government will then have to pay for their benefits. job done.
    :cool:The whole point is no one pays for uni upfront. The graduate pays once they have a job that pays more than £21k per annum. If for some reason the graduate gets paid less or stops working, then nothing is paid. After 30 years the debt is written off. Poorer students will also get a much more generous maintenance grant and there is talk of also getting a scholarship grant. All students who earn over £21k from 2012 will pay less a month on their student debt than students with student debts pay today.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KingofSpades)
    but "the government" would still have subsidized your degree, so it would have been your call whether you went or did not.

    is getting a job inferior to uni, and can one not do something great without a degree?

    At what point did Cameron say, poor people cannot go to uni
    Sorry, my post was more aimed at the guy i first quoted, aka replying to the previous guy that if poor kids can't afford Uni, 'blame the parents'. Implying, no subsidy or help should come from the government etc.

    And yes i agree many can do amazing things without a degree ...but it's never a bad idea good to have a degree as back up, which is what i'm personally doing .
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by natalie-uhsu)
    I completely agree!! I think those idiots that kick a ball around a field for more money in 1 week than the majority earn in a year should contribute massively. 1 weeks wages would pay for loads of students to go to uni!
    Yes, so if you somehow become and footballer you are an idiot and should solely pay for people to go to Uni..
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by admbeatmaker)
    This university cost debate is tricky however, if the increased fees are allowed by government then we'll see a definite social class divide. It's already there, but it'll be worsened. The rich will be largely unaffected but the poor will miss out on opportunities and a future they may have once dreamt about.

    The system should remain as is, students are the future.
    Why would the poor miss out? No one will be paying fees upfront, the terms are much better for poor students than the current system. Under the new system only graduates pay money back for their loan once they earn over £21K. The more the graduate earns the more money is paid back. Poor students will get a much higher maintenance grant and other benefits. By supporting the status quo you are supporting a system that does not fund universities properly, or the number of students now or in the future, and is worse for poor students.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AshleyT)
    Sorry, my post was more aimed at the guy i first quoted, aka replying to the previous guy that if poor kids can't afford Uni, 'blame the parents'. Implying, no subsidy or help should come from the government etc.

    And yes i agree many can do amazing things without a degree ...but it's never a bad idea good to have a degree as back up, which is what i'm personally doing .
    that guy.............he was me.............................. .......lol
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CookieDoughLove)
    Where does the money come from to pay football players? Anyone know?
    The FA sell the television rights to the premier league, this generates vast sums of money and when distributed to the clubs and then gate money and kit money,season tickets etc are added in, it comes to millions.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by charcharchar)
    I wonder who paid for David Cameron's education?

    Mummy and Daddy, I guess.


    rich *******s.
    lol in it.:rolleyes:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fysidiko)
    I'm not sure that I see how your figures support your points. Let me address the points you raised in turn.

    First, the breakdown of the fees. You say that the analysis doesn't stand up once all the costs are taken into account; but when you take all your costs into account - including a healthy spend on entertainment, a generous pension and holidays - you still have around twice as much left over as is required to make the loan repayments. That hardly seems to support the proposition that finding the repayments is a great burden on graduates. And this is at £40,000, a figure that only a minority will earn; at a lower salary the repayments will be a lower proportion of total income. A good friend of mine earns around £23,000, living in central London, and is able to save money at the end of each month after his student loan repayments; I suspect he spends more money on things he doesn't actually want than he does on his loan repayments.

    Second, regarding your point that the system can only work if all graduates earn significantly above average earnings - I'm not sure I see why. You cite the example of a graduate in your office earning less than £20,000, presumably as an example of someone who will struggle to make repayments; but the point seems moot since she would, under the new system, have to make no repayments at all, and even on the current system will only have to pay around £20 pcm.

    Thirdly, regarding children. You are of course right that this increases the expense significantly, and it is a subject that I've given a lot of thought; I will soon be earning around £40k and would like at some point to have children, so the question of how to pay for it has been on my mind. It's worth bearing in mind that even on the analysis above, a person on £40,000 would only need to save for a few years in order to have a significant amount of money to offset against the increased costs of bringing up children. Savings can also be found by skipping holidays and cutting down on entertainment. I know my parents had to cut back when I was born but they did fine, and that was when only my Dad was working and was earning what, adjusted for inflation, was rather less than £40,000.

    This is all a fairly common-sense conclusion, I think: it would be a sorry state of affairs in this country if a graduate with a take-home income of over £27,000 were unable to make ends meet. The theoretical graduate on £40,000 with a student loan takes home as much as a person on £37,000 without; still a very respectable wedge of cash.
    :I totally agree, excellent analysis.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Ungeziefer)
    Graduates bring money into the economy, especially in a knowledge-based economy such as the UK. Everyone in society benefits from a high quality education system.

    People who haven't been to university themselves seem to think that their tax money is being spent by students. Perhaps they should consider the money that graduates are putting in everybody's pockets by bringing wealth into society.

    To those who believe that HE is a luxury, I wonder if they feel the same way about other publicly-funded institutions. For example, would they feel happy to pay for medical care for non-fatal conditions?
    Agreed.
    Plus, the graduates generally earn more, which means they put more into the system through taxes. Then get less out of the system because they earn to much.

    Take someone that earns £50k a year, they pay twice as much in taxes and their children don't even get a maintenance loan...

    So surely if we reduce the number of people that can afford uni, we'll reduce the number of graduates. Therefore we reduce the number of people paying more into the system via taxes than they receive from the system.

    To me that equals a big loss... Especially seems as those potential graduates aren't going to be finding a job any time soon...

    *Awaits crucifixion for having an opinion*
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KingofSpades)
    that guy.............he was me.............................. .......lol
    No, it was 'ajtiesto' .
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.