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    (Original post by Chelle-belle)
    Ah does Cambridge not offer Physics then
    I've heard you have to study all three for two years or something and then specialise.
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    I took 8, you should do 8 or more, if you really want to stand out

    Oxbridge don't stand for anything less
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    Like many have said, six A-levels would be irrelevant.

    I do five [English Literature, History, Economics, Mathematics & Politics] and it proves to be quite a lot.

    If you're planning on doing Physics or Mathematics in University then Mathematics, Further Maths and Physics is plenty (and maybe English Literature/History as a fourth A-level to show versatility).
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    (Original post by OS92)
    Economics is a "blacklisted" subject
    .

    - No, Economics is not a "blacklisted" subject. Mathematics is preferred, but Economics certainly isn't blacklisted.
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    (Original post by KingofSpades)
    I took 8, you should do 8 or more, if you really want to stand out

    Oxbridge don't stand for anything less
    Sarcasm?
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    Like many have said, six A-levels would be irrelevant.

    I do five [English Literature, History, Economics, Mathematics & Politics] and it proves to be quite a lot.

    If you're planning on doing Physics or Mathematics in University then Mathematics, Further Maths and Physics is plenty (and maybe English Literature/History as a fourth A-level to show versatility).
    Thanks for the reply. Wouldn't it be a good idea to take Chemistry along side Physics as well?
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    Definitely. If you can handle it, you should do it.

    But you may seem rather one-dimensional if you're completely science orientated. If you're set on Physics or another science as a career and degree choice, then I would probably advise Chemistry along side Mathematics, Further Maths and Physics just to show awesomeness.
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    (Original post by aliakhtar)
    How about Biology as well? The Natural Sciences course at Cambridge teaches all three so wouldn't it be a good idea to do all three?
    If you do natural sciences, you say when you apply whether you want to specialise in either Biological or Physical NatSci.

    For example, I've applied for Physical NatSci and if I get in, my degree will look like this:
    1st year: Maths, Physics, Chemistry & Materials/CompSci/Geology
    2nd year: Maths, Physics A, Physics B
    3rd year: Experimental and Theoretical Physics
    4th year: Experimental and Theoretical Physics

    As you can see, you can become a straight "physicist" in the second year. You could do some biology if you wanted, but it's definitely not compulsory. You can definitely get your fair share of physics and maths, and the DAMTP has an outstanding reputation

    Here's a link to Cambridge's course structure: http://www.cam.ac.uk/about/natscitripos/ps/structure/

    You definitely don't have to do any biology; that's what's great about Cambridge's course - you don't have to marginalise yourself as a "chemist", "biologist" or "physicist". The sciences are linked, and the course lets you tailor your degree to your wants/needs.

    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    .

    - No, Economics is not a "blacklisted" subject. Mathematics is preferred, but Economics certainly isn't blacklisted.
    I know that, but you could try reading the whole thread and you'll see that I corrected myself. It's not blacklisted but it's only "of limited use for arts subjects"; doesn't change the fact that it's completely useless for science at Cambridge, though
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    Physics at A-level is alright, but it no way is like University level which is applied Mathematics.
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    (Original post by OS92)
    It's not blacklisted but it's only "of limited use for arts subjects"
    http://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/index.php?pageid=604 - Hmm?
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    (Original post by StephenP91)
    Physics at A-level is alright, but it no way is like University level which is applied Mathematics.
    So there's an even bigger jump from A-Level Physics to Uni Physics?
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    (Original post by aliakhtar)
    So there's an even bigger jump from A-Level Physics to Uni Physics?
    Of course.
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    (Original post by aliakhtar)
    So there's an even bigger jump from A-Level Physics to Uni Physics?
    Well you should come to expect that naturally. If you ever plan to take Physics to Uni then Maths and Further Maths is a must or at least Maths.
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    (Original post by OS92)
    If you do natural sciences, you say when you apply whether you want to specialise in either Biological or Physical NatSci.

    For example, I've applied for Physical NatSci and if I get in, my degree will look like this:
    1st year: Maths, Physics, Chemistry & Materials/CompSci/Geology
    2nd year: Maths, Physics A, Physics B
    3rd year: Experimental and Theoretical Physics
    4th year: Experimental and Theoretical Physics

    As you can see, you can become a straight "physicist" in the second year. You could do some biology if you wanted, but it's definitely not compulsory. You can definitely get your fair share of physics and maths, and the DAMTP has an outstanding reputation

    Here's a link to Cambridge's course structure: http://www.cam.ac.uk/about/natscitripos/ps/structure/

    You definitely don't have to do any biology; that's what's great about Cambridge's course - you don't have to marginalise yourself as a "chemist", "biologist" or "physicist". The sciences are linked, and the course lets you tailor your degree to your wants/needs.



    I know that, but you could try reading the whole thread and you'll see that I corrected myself. It's not blacklisted but it's only "of limited use for arts subjects"; doesn't change the fact that it's completely useless for science at Cambridge, though

    That makes life much easier now. I can stick to 4 A-Levels now if I want to do either Physics or Economics. Thanks, this has been wonderful help and I will check out the link you have mentioned in a while
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    Of course.
    Isn't the biggest jump in education from GCSE to A-Level? This is what my teachers have been telling me for the last two years
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    (Original post by aliakhtar)
    Physics and Maths are the subjects I love in GCSE. Physics is like my passion, it is the one subject that I do extra research on and I even wrote a few articles on it. I'm predicted 11 A*'s in GCSE's so instead of taking 4 AS Levels I want to differentiate myself and take 6 AS Levels.

    Physics
    Maths
    Further Maths
    Chemistry
    English Language or Literature
    Economics

    Would those be good subject choices for studying Physics in the future as a undergraduate in university?
    no need for economics. if u merk them 5 a levels and get at least 6+ a*'s which looks likely as your predicted 11 a*'s...the academic side to uni is sorted
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    (Original post by aliakhtar)
    That makes life much easier now. I can stick to 4 A-Levels now if I want to do either Physics or Economics. Thanks, this has been wonderful help and I will check out the link you have mentioned in a while
    No problem, hope you make the right choices

    Stop nitpicking and find something else fun to do, economics is still useless for physics.
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    (Original post by aliakhtar)
    Isn't the biggest jump in education from GCSE to A-Level? This is what my teachers have been telling me for the last two years
    Well, the GCSE - A-Level jump is different for everyone. As you're tested purely on strengths at A-Level rather than broadly as done in GCSE, it's a rather big jump if you're not picking things you're particularly strong at.

    The main jump to University is independent study - and lots of it.
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    If you want to differentiate yourself and do alot of subjects, just do the IB course.
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    Well, the GCSE - A-Level jump is different for everyone. As you're tested purely on strengths at A-Level rather than broadly as done in GCSE, it's a rather big jump if you're not picking things you're particularly strong at.

    The main jump to University is independent study - and lots of it.
    So basically A-Levels is just a build-up to what your going to experience at Uni. It's a bit like the build up from Key Stage 3 to GCSE right?

    Would Further Maths really later on in Uni or can you just start the concepts fresh at Uni?
 
 
 
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