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    (Original post by CoffeeStinks)
    I have an interview with Queen Mary next week and was wondering whether I should go with my mum or not. She's kind of looking forward to it. I want her there for moral support but I'd feel sort of self consious if she was inside the room when I'm actually getting interviewed. She has this habit of showing her emotions on her face so if I was asked a question and didn't answer it the way she would, I'd sense her disgust. If you know what I mean.

    So two questions:
    Are parents invited inside the interview room with you?
    And do you have any other tips about interviews.

    Ta m'loves
    Don't worry! I understand how you feel. I had a similar feeling, but they won't let your parents in the interview room. Or even if they do, you still have the choice of telling her not to get into the room. She can stay outside.

    Tips for interview would be:

    * Read your personal statement in detail and think of possible things they might ask (e.g. if you write about a certain thing that increased your interest in your course, they may ask "What exactly did you like about that [thing]?"

    * Make sure you have an answer to why you want to join that particular university (its local / was recommended by someone / reputation / offers my course...)

    * Make sure you know why you want to do the course you are doing. Should have been covered in your PS but anyway they might still ask you. (like the subjects / looking for a career in it / enjoy doing a certain part of it (name it)...

    * Do some research about your course and mention specific items. This will give you more security and they will know that you are serious and fully motivated about it.

    I hope that helps.
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    So glad that none of my offers have asked for an interview xD
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    Even if parents were invited, surely it would be better to stand on your own two feet? Just for the experience if nothing else!
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    I wouldn't if I were you, you're like 17/18? It's time to be independent...
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    What do you think they do, have cameras that follow you? :rolleyes:
    Nope, secret invisible spies! lol
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    Undergrad interviews are open days. That's the point. It's fully expected that your parents come along. There are special events put on for the parents of all the interviewees. Why would you tell your parents: "you are not allowed to attend this event that has been arranged for you, even though everyone else's parents will be there"?
    Universities never used to put on those 'special events', they aren't remotely necessary. They had to start doing that because of the numbers of parents who were showing up and generally getting in the way. Its easier for them to keep them corralled somewhere so they can get on with interviews in peace rather than having them hanging around being a general nuisance.
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    (Original post by Larrabee)
    Universities never used to put on those 'special events', they aren't remotely necessary. They had to start doing that because of the numbers of parents who were showing up and generally getting in the way. Its easier for them to keep them corralled somewhere so they can get on with interviews in peace rather than having them hanging around being a general nuisance.
    Absolutely this. Universities oganise seperate open days ahead of UCAS applications - take your parents then.

    From my experiences of being sat in the staff coffee room in a department at a red-brick university I can say that academic admissions tutors and interviews are constantly bemused and rather scathing of the encroachment of parents into the interview process. To put it simply, most academics hold the private view the today's university applicants are mollycoddled by mummy and daddy far too much as well as being spoonfed information at school rather than educated. It was distressing to see the number of straight A students I taught in first year who had a) no ability to think independently and b) a massively over-inflated sense of entitlement.

    At least most institutions have the good sense to keep parents out of the interview room itself. However, I do know of an occasion where a father demanded to be in the interview room with his daughter (on the pretext that otherwise she would be alone with a strange man) and proceeded to try and answer any question she stuggled with until he was politely but firmly asked to shut up or get out by the academic interviewer - ridiculous!!
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    Like people mentioned above; you can take your parents with you, but you cannot take them inside interview room.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    Absolutely this. Universities oganise seperate open days ahead of UCAS applications - take your parents then.

    From my experiences of being sat in the staff coffee room in a department at a red-brick university I can say that academic admissions tutors and interviews are constantly bemused and rather scathing of the encroachment of parents into the interview process. To put it simply, most academics hold the private view the today's university applicants are mollycoddled by mummy and daddy far too much as well as being spoonfed information at school rather than educated. It was distressing to see the number of straight A students I taught in first year who had a) no ability to think independently and b) a massively over-inflated sense of entitlement.

    At least most institutions have the good sense to keep parents out of the interview room itself. However, I do know of an occasion where a father demanded to be in the interview room with his daughter (on the pretext that otherwise she would be alone with a strange man) and proceeded to try and answer any question she stuggled with until he was politely but firmly asked to shut up or get out by the academic interviewer - ridiculous!!

    How odd. What university are you at? I know that at both the UK universities I've studied at, the exact opposite was the truth. The department understood perfectly well that a majority of the applicants wouldn't have attended the UCAS open day, and so both prospective students and their parents needed a second opportunity to visit the department. It seems like the obvious thing to do would be to combine this with informal interviews. Certainly at Nottingham we openly invite the parents along and expect them to attend.

    All the way back in 2000 when I was going for interviews, all five of my choices openly invited my parents along and made specific provisions for them, so this certainly isn't a recent development. Going by my experience, it certainly seems that you/your department are the exception rather than the rule.
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    (Original post by Larrabee)
    Universities never used to put on those 'special events', they aren't remotely necessary. They had to start doing that because of the numbers of parents who were showing up and generally getting in the way. Its easier for them to keep them corralled somewhere so they can get on with interviews in peace rather than having them hanging around being a general nuisance.
    This simply isn't true. As I said above, this has been the de facto method of doing things back to at least the late 90s.

    UCAS open days are to help you decide which 5 choices to put. I, like the majority of people, didn't even go to a UCAS open day, because I hadn't made up my mind. The "open day and interview" is then a chance for you to decide which of your five choices to put as your firm and insurance.
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    1) do not bring your mummy
    2) no the interview is one on one, not a group discussion
    3) people do not bring parents, it is not an open day

    However what you could do is go up with her, she can look round the shops etc and she doesn’t go to the uni at all.
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    Parents + Interviews = :coma:
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    How odd. What university are you at? I know that at both the UK universities I've studied at, the exact opposite was the truth. The department understood perfectly well that a majority of the applicants wouldn't have attended the UCAS open day, and so both prospective students and their parents needed a second opportunity to visit the department. It seems like the obvious thing to do would be to combine this with informal interviews. Certainly at Nottingham we openly invite the parents along and expect them to attend.

    All the way back in 2000 when I was going for interviews, all five of my choices openly invited my parents along and made specific provisions for them, so this certainly isn't a recent development. Going by my experience, it certainly seems that you/your department are the exception rather than the rule.
    I think we perhaps are misunderstanding each other. What university and departmental administrations do and provide and what their academic staff think are entirely different things. Of course, universities have, for a long time and increasingly so, recognised that parents demand to be catered for, however that doesn't stop the fact that most academics would rather have students who display a bit of adult indepedence rather than treating the whole affair like picking a secondary school with mummy and daddy. I think what annoys most academics is the growing sense of undeserved entitlement amongst applicants and also the growing number of 'pushy parents' determined to get involved in the entire applications process.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    I think we perhaps are misunderstanding each other. What university and departmental administrations do and provide and what their academic staff think are entirely different things. Of course, universities have, for a long time and increasingly so, recognised that parents demand to be catered for, however that doesn't stop the fact that most academics would rather have students who display a bit of adult indepedence rather than treating the whole affair like picking a secondary school with mummy and daddy. I think what annoys most academics is the growing sense of undeserved entitlement amongst applicants and also the growing number of 'pushy parents' determined to get involved in the entire applications process.
    I can see your point about the disturbing lack of any kind of independence of thought amongst undergrads - I taught 1st, 2nd and 3rd year phycisists for 4 years, and their inability to move beyond the spoon-feeding paradigm of A-levels is indeed deeply disturbing, but I see no reason why allowing parents to come to an open day with them necessarily has any link to that (after all, its very likely that many parents will be making a large financial commitment to your department, so seeing what it is they will be paying for only seems fair). I would suggest that the fault for that particular issue lies at the door of the UK secondary education system.

    Perhaps the academics in your Chemistry department see things differently, but none of the ones I knew/know blame the increasingly poor standard of school leavers on parental interference.


    I fully admit that I let my parents came to my interviews with me, partly because I would have felt cruel telling them they couldn't, partly because they had agreed to help me out with fees (so it only seemed fair), and partly because my dad knew a hell of a lot more about physics at that point than some 18yo kid. I fail to see how this demonstrates a lack of an inclination towards independent thought. I fact I would suggest it demonstrates a degree of clear thinking often lacking in teenagers.
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    I don't think you're allowed to have other people with you in the interview room
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    (Original post by py0alb)
    I can see your point about the disturbing lack of any kind of independence of thought amongst undergrads - I taught 1st, 2nd and 3rd year phycisists for 4 years, and their inability to move beyond the spoon-feeding paradigm of A-levels is indeed deeply disturbing, but I see no reason why allowing parents to come to an open day with them necessarily has any link to that (after all, its very likely that many parents will be making a large financial commitment to your department, so seeing what it is they will be paying for only seems fair). I would suggest that the fault for that particular issue lies at the door of the UK secondary education system.
    We are talking about interview days here, not open days. It is symptomatic, rather than causitive.

    Perhaps the academics in your Chemistry department see things differently, but none of the ones I knew/know blame the increasingly poor standard of school leavers on parental interference.
    It's part of the whole dire state that education finds itself in. There is nothing wrong with interested parents, but when they merely add pressure to get grades on top of the central pressure to do so then it is a problem. Most academics I know (including several in the Nottingham School of Physics) just see over-involved parents as another symptom of the importing of consumerism into higher education - parents are more bothered than the actual applicants because they are the ones with the financial interest - that isn't a good thing.


    I fully admit that I let my parents came to my interviews with me, partly because I would have felt cruel telling them they couldn't, partly because they had agreed to help me out with fees (so it only seemed fair), and partly because my dad knew a hell of a lot more about physics at that point than some 18yo kid. I fail to see how this demonstrates a lack of an inclination towards independent thought. I fact I would suggest it demonstrates a degree of clear thinking often lacking in teenagers.
    Like I said before, I have no problem with parents going to open days ahead of application time, but not to interview days. I think it definitely demonstrates independence to be able to get yourself to an interview session and not require the immediate support of your parents whilst there - you may disagree, but it would hardly be acceptable to do take your parents to any other sort of interview situation.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    We are talking about interview days here, not open days. It is symptomatic, rather than causitive.

    It's part of the whole dire state that education finds itself in. There is nothing wrong with interested parents, but when they merely add pressure to get grades on top of the central pressure to do so then it is a problem. Most academics I know (including several in the Nottingham School of Physics) just see over-involved parents as another symptom of the importing of consumerism into higher education - parents are more bothered than the actual applicants because they are the ones with the financial interest - that isn't a good thing.

    Like I said before, I have no problem with parents going to open days ahead of application time, but not to interview days. I think it definitely demonstrates independence to be able to get yourself to an interview session and not require the immediate support of your parents whilst there - you may disagree, but it would hardly be acceptable to do take your parents to any other sort of interview situation.
    We're still talking at cross purposes here. You talk about open days and interview days as if they're separate entities. They're not, at least not in any university I'm aware of (perhaps Oxbridge maybe?). They are a combined event, and have been as long as I am aware. Parents and student turn up. Separate events are organised for both of them for the entire day, including an informal interview for the student.

    What Nottingham physics academics do you know?
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    Funny. Why the hell would you bring your mum? Your interviewer would find it ridiculous and immature..
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    (Original post by Fission_Mailed)
    There's a sign in my medical school at the moment: "A100 Interviews- Waiting area ->> - No parents beyond this sign" :lol:
    :laugh: I love Nottingham Uni, bless them.
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    As a mum I would not dream of going into an interview with my child. This would be a very bad idea.

    However driving them up to the university- helping to check out clothing/mobile phone/money/time of interview/interview letter and also going round before hand to check out where the actual venue is are all legit in my book. Needless to say my eldest child refused for me to drive him up to interviews and on one occasion left the phone charger in his dad's car and ran out of charge. However once he had offers we did go up to each university as a family, arranged to look around a hall of residence and looked at the library/campus/town etc - essential, as it would have been lonely for a 17 year old to go round by themselves, we couldn't make the official open days and it was a really nice thing to do as a family. Then we chatted about it on the way home. On moving in day the whole family piled in the full car : we didn't care a bit that we might be embarrassing- we were thrilled to look at his hall room and helped him put all the stuff in it, had a cup of tea in his new room and then left him to it. I still remember the day I moved into my halls decades ago.
 
 
 
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