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    (Original post by KeyserNI)
    That stuff doesn't look bad compared to some of the other interior design stuff I've seen.
    Interior architects don't get enough recognition. You thought that stuff was good but I didn't think so compared to my courses third and fourth year work.

    This is third year work from an interiors course.



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    Architects, stop thinking so lowly of interior architects and so highly of yourselves.
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    That work looks awful.
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    Jesus you're a ******. Show me your work.
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    Inside Out, what are you trying to prove? The quality of the rendering? Architecture and Interior architecture are equal? (I'm sorry but they simply are not) If you want to see some of the best architecture work, go to www.presidentsmedals.com. Here you will see projects which are not only visually better than any interior architecture work but also more sophisticated in terms of project content (albeit more 'academic'). This isn't intended to sound arrogant or pretentious, it is simply the categorical truth.
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    (Original post by Inside Out)
    Interior architects don't get enough recognition. You thought that stuff was good but I didn't think so compared to my courses third and fourth year work.

    This is third year work from an interiors course.



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    Architects, stop thinking so lowly of interior architects and so highly of yourselves.
    Do you go to Nottingham Trent by any chance?

    EDIT: Just saw the Cork Institute of Technology on there
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    (Original post by Ex Death)
    Inside Out, what are you trying to prove? The quality of the rendering? Architecture and Interior architecture are equal? (I'm sorry but they simply are not) If you want to see some of the best architecture work, go to www.presidentsmedals.com. Here you will see projects which are not only visually better than any interior architecture work but also more sophisticated in terms of project content (albeit more 'academic'). This isn't intended to sound arrogant or pretentious, it is simply the categorical truth.
    Please describe how your project content is more sophisticated. Also, how long do you generally get for each project in first, second and third year?
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    That pathetic project above is like 50sqm:

    - There is no context? Where is it sited?
    - No suggestion of how its put together
    - Awful graphics and fonts
    - No complexity
    - Can't even draw a staircase properly
    - No Scale shown
    - No orientation shown
    - Use of only one medium (Rendering) - and poor cheesy 'myfirstrenderings'
    - No intellectual conceptual exploration

    I'm not even going to waste my time on it.
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    (Original post by ArchiBoi)
    That pathetic project above is like 50sqm:

    - There is no context? Where is it sited?
    - No suggestion of how its put together
    - Awful graphics and fonts
    - No complexity
    - Can't even draw a staircase properly
    - No Scale shown
    - No orientation shown
    - Use of only one medium (Rendering) - and poor cheesy 'myfirstrenderings'
    - No intellectual conceptual exploration

    I'm not even going to waste my time on it.
    I would have to agree. I did warn you. Interior architecture and architecture are two different things. That project seems like it is situated within the context of a black hole.

    I was talking about the models when I said they didn't look too bad, I think they are quite good. Also you do four years, is one of those a year in practice?


    (Original post by Ex Death)
    Inside Out, what are you trying to prove? The quality of the rendering? Architecture and Interior architecture are equal? (I'm sorry but they simply are not) If you want to see some of the best architecture work, go to www.presidentsmedals.com. Here you will see projects which are not only visually better than any interior architecture work but also more sophisticated in terms of project content (albeit more 'academic'). This isn't intended to sound arrogant or pretentious, it is simply the categorical truth.
    No that doesn't sound arrogant at at.
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    (Original post by Inside Out)
    Interior architects don't get enough recognition. You thought that stuff was good but I didn't think so compared to my courses third and fourth year work.

    This is third year work from an interiors course.



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    Architects, stop thinking so lowly of interior architects and so highly of yourselves.
    I'm not sure if that is really your work but, first years at my university can cad and render that in 4 days.

    Never mind 3rd years at your university.
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    (Original post by ArchiBoi)
    That pathetic project above is like 50sqm:

    - There is no context? Where is it sited?
    - No suggestion of how its put together
    - Awful graphics and fonts
    - No complexity
    - Can't even draw a staircase properly
    - No Scale shown
    - No orientation shown
    - Use of only one medium (Rendering) - and poor cheesy 'myfirstrenderings'
    - No intellectual conceptual exploration

    I'm not even going to waste my time on it.
    So that's why you think architecture students are better? Because they design bigger buildings?

    However, I have to agree with all of your points
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    (Original post by pippa90)
    So that's why you think architecture students are better? Because they design bigger buildings?

    However, I have to agree with all of your points
    That list has nothing to do with bigger buildings. Complexity does not mean bigger, context does not mean bigger, conceptual exploration does not mean bigger etc.

    The majority of my projects during my degree would have been smaller than that.
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    A huge part of building design is how it synthesises with it's surroundings (or directly clashes with it as a design statement), we've just done a project where we had to design a 'first-roots' building, which was all about trimming it down to a singular emotion or activity.

    Though I'm a first year so I can't really comment on the work hours or the CAD discussion :no:
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    Maybe the architect students in this thread would have more time to socialise/sleep if they didn't waste their time arguing "my course is tougher than your course!" in a student forum?
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    (Original post by pippa90)
    Please describe how your project content is more sophisticated. Also, how long do you generally get for each project in first, second and third year?
    Have you looked at the website I quoted? Don't just look at the images, read the text (student + tutor statements) of the projects so that you can understand what they are about.

    The project content is usually more sophisticated because there are more issues to consider when designing the entirety of a building (a lot of projects don't even manage to do this as there simply isn't enough time, even with all the ridiculous hours). The way architecture is taught is also very different as it is fixed in a very academic learning environment. Rich projects are expected to have sophisticated and intelligent conceptual ideas which usually emerge from contextual influences. An architectural response is then expected to develop from this, with the links between the two being evident. And it also has to look good all the way down to the finest details.

    In first and second year, projects can range from 2 weeks to 8-12 weeks. Third year is usually 12 weeks (1 each semester). I'm not sure why you're asking this though because the workload correlates with the duration of the project (a 12 week project will have double the amount of work of a 6 weeks project).

    (Original post by Danielle89)
    Maybe the architect students in this thread would have more time to socialise/sleep if they didn't waste their time arguing "my course is tougher than your course!" in a student forum?
    I think most of the architecture students posting on these forums do so as a 2 minute break from work. I'm on my year out right now so I have lots of free time though I probably won't be posting much around this time next year.
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    (Original post by KeyserNI)
    That list has nothing to do with bigger buildings. Complexity does not mean bigger, context does not mean bigger, conceptual exploration does not mean bigger etc.

    The majority of my projects during my degree would have been smaller than that.
    I know it doesn't, I said that because at the beginning of his post he said something like "this pathetic project is like 50sqm". Then I said that I agreed with his points, two different things
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    (Original post by pippa90)
    I know it doesn't, I said that because at the beginning of his post he said something like "this pathetic project is like 50sqm". Then I said that I agreed with his points, two different things
    RIBA criteria for part 2 require you design a project that is I think 250 sqm +

    Despite this as a rule to gain complexity, this means the consideration of fire escapes, acoustics, lighting, environmental analysis, circulation, disabled access routes, security, zoning etc.

    All of the above criteria can be found in the RIBA guidelines.

    To me it seems they are wanna-be architects. Pretenders.

    I am loving the natural light and windows in that design...
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    (Original post by Ex Death)
    Have you looked at the website I quoted? Don't just look at the images, read the text (student + tutor statements) of the projects so that you can understand what they are about.

    The project content is usually more sophisticated because there are more issues to consider when designing the entirety of a building (a lot of projects don't even manage to do this as there simply isn't enough time, even with all the ridiculous hours). The way architecture is taught is also very different as it is fixed in a very academic learning environment. Rich projects are expected to have sophisticated and intelligent conceptual ideas which usually emerge from contextual influences. An architectural response is then expected to develop from this, with the links between the two being evident. And it also has to look good all the way down to the finest details.

    In first and second year, projects can range from 2 weeks to 8-12 weeks. Third year is usually 12 weeks (1 each semester). I'm not sure why you're asking this though because the workload correlates with the duration of the project (a 12 week project will have double the amount of work of a 6 weeks project).
    Yeah I had a look, they were really good. However if the RIBA picked out the best work from interior architecture/design, I think that they would be of the same quality. The exterior may not look as exciting for interior designers, because that is usually just the site that they are given, and then have to work within a contained space. I don't know which is harder or would produce the best results, starting off from scratch or working with a space that may be rather limited.

    I was just asking because I was wondering if we had the same timeframe to complete projects, and that some of the models in the pictures that I showed from my interior design course were taken mostly from third years, but also a few second and first years. In first year we have mostly 1-2 week projects, with 4 week projects at the end of each semester. We also don't design actual buildings until the end of the year, maybe that makes a difference?
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    *insert joke about being the civil engineers ***** at the end of it all*

    I really feel for you guys.
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    (Original post by ArchiBoi)
    RIBA criteria for part 2 require you design a project that is I think 250 sqm +

    Despite this as a rule to gain complexity, this means the consideration of fire escapes, acoustics, lighting, environmental analysis, circulation, disabled access routes, security, zoning etc.

    All of the above criteria can be found in the RIBA guidelines.

    To me it seems they are wanna-be architects. Pretenders.

    I am loving the natural light and windows in that design...
    Do you mean to get onto the part 2 or to complete the part 2? Because that piece of work would be like part 1 as it's only BA.

    From what I've seen, 3rd years on my course have considered most of those things, perhaps not fire exits and security because it isn't their job.

    Yeah, when I was younger I wanted to be an architect, but in the end I chose interior design because in the real world, you are allowed to do more exciting things with an interior. After watching grand designs for years and seeing all of the buildings which weren't allowed to be this and that because of rules and neighbours complaining. Have a look at Verner Panton's house if you haven't already, it looks pretty ordinary on the outside but when you go inside it's like BAM! with a load of colour and patterns. I highly doubt I could design something that wacky for the exterior of a building in the real world
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    (Original post by pippa90)
    Do you mean to get onto the part 2 or to complete the part 2? Because that piece of work would be like part 1 as it's only BA.

    From what I've seen, 3rd years on my course have considered most of those things, perhaps not fire exits and security because it isn't their job.

    Yeah, when I was younger I wanted to be an architect, but in the end I chose interior design because in the real world, you are allowed to do more exciting things with an interior. After watching grand designs for years and seeing all of the buildings which weren't allowed to be this and that because of rules and neighbours complaining. Have a look at Verner Panton's house if you haven't already, it looks pretty ordinary on the outside but when you go inside it's like BAM! with a load of colour and patterns. I highly doubt I could design something that wacky for the exterior of a building in the real world
    Personally I think telling someone to look at the presidents medals as the basis for an argument is pointless Ex Death, you are pointing out the best work from every school not the average work. We don't all produce work like that and even though I was almost nominated my work isn't up there with UCL, AA, Westminster etc. Look at Finalcrit.com for lots of average work which is mostly still very good.

    I've never seen any interior design work at degree level that looked anything like the presidents medals or even anything like the average work produced at most schools, I'm sorry but I just haven't. If you could post a link to some work more than a couple of models that would be great.

    I know I have small one week one page projects that look better than that it's not just all about time. Where is the rest of the work? All I see is renders and plans and then some photoshop circles, where is the development work, where are the models etc? This all goes along with what actually goes up on the wall and without it we would be failed. If that was first year architecture it would fail because of all the things mentioned which even in first year you need to address. I did warn the poster that putting work up would result in this, interior design and architecture are two different things and they address different issues.

    I have to laugh at your last comment. Architects have designed and will continue to design the interiors of buildings that are more than just non de script boxes. I can probably count on one hand the times I have had to look at an interior designers work when contemplating precedent.
 
 
 
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