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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)



    Consider what you want to do at university first, though.
    In terms of what I want to do as a course at, I have my 'heart set' on doing Law at university. Also realistically I'm aiming for the lesser repuitable Russel Group members.

    So I decided upon doing: Law (read post 14 as to why), History, Economics and the last option is the reason for debate. Should I take English Lit or Chemistry? I'm equally good at both (on the A/A* boundary) and find them both good subjects at GCSE, however it's case of do I go for the subject rhat compliments the others well (english) or do I go for a bit of added breath (Chemistry)?
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    (Original post by ollie51)
    In terms of what I want to do as a course at, I have my 'heart set' on doing Law at university. Also realistically I'm aiming for the lesser repuitable Russel Group members.

    So I decided upon doing: Law (read post 14 as to why), History, Economics and the last option is the reason for debate. Should I take English Lit or Chemistry? I'm equally good at both (on the A/A* boundary) and find them both good subjects at GCSE, however it's case of do I go for the subject rhat compliments the others well (english) or do I go for a bit of added breath (Chemistry)?
    Tut tut tut! Law applicants at university are advised not to take Law A-Level. They're advised to take Literature, History, (maybe a language) and a science (Chemistry)/Mathematics.

    I would definitely advise English Literature, History, Chemistry and Economics/Mathematics. You will be penalised for Law A-Level, especially if you want to go to a high level university.
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    I think you should study English...It will be much more helpful helpful for your History/Law major...
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    (Original post by ollie51)
    In terms of what I want to do as a course at, I have my 'heart set' on doing Law at university. Also realistically I'm aiming for the lesser repuitable Russel Group members.

    So I decided upon doing: Law (read post 14 as to why), History, Economics and the last option is the reason for debate. Should I take English Lit or Chemistry? I'm equally good at both (on the A/A* boundary) and find them both good subjects at GCSE, however it's case of do I go for the subject rhat compliments the others well (english) or do I go for a bit of added breath (Chemistry)?
    I would study English literature.

    English literature, history, economics, law and critical thinking is a sound combination, despite law being criticised as being a 'soft' subject.

    Are you planning on taking all your AS-levels to A2? If you don't, I would drop law after AS, but your law firm wants you to do the whole A-level doesn't it? I would NOT drop any of the other A-levels apart from critical thinking because you need three academic, challenging and respected A-levels under your belt to study at prestigious universities.
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    (Original post by mathew551)
    I would study English literature.

    English literature, history, economics, law and critical thinking is a sound combination, despite law being criticised as being a 'soft' subject.

    Are you planning on taking all your AS-levels to A2? If you don't, I would drop law after AS, but your law firm wants you to do the whole A-level doesn't it? I would NOT drop any of the other A-levels apart from critical thinking because you need three academic, challenging and respected A-levels under your belt to study at prestigious universities.
    Critical Thinking and Law are both "less preferred" A-Levels. Clearly you wouldn't approach LSE or Oxbridge with such A-Levels.
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    Tut tut tut! Law applicants at university are advised not to take Law A-Level. They're advised to take Literature, History, (maybe a language) and a science (Chemistry)/Mathematics.

    I would definitely advise English Literature, History, Chemistry and Economics/Mathematics. You will be penalised for Law A-Level, especially if you want to go to a high level university.
    I phoned durham and based on my circumstances they said I would be stronger candidate if were to the A-Level and 6-9 months of work experience than If I were to do neither, I got my Grandad to ask around at Cardiff (he lectures there) thy said the same as durham. It's also irrelevant as the Law A level is purely criminal (As to why I have to do it so I can do work experience isn't unclear, I also feel I would enjoy doing law). and I'm looking at doing either contract or european law degree.
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    Although I don't think either of the above provide contract Law but I think warwick does.
    Based on what you said above it sounds as if Law, Economics, History and CHEMISTRY would be best. I have to say I agree as all my other options are essay based.
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    (Original post by ollie51)
    I phoned durham and based on my circumstances they said I would be stronger candidate if were to the A-Level and 6-9 months of work experience than If I were to do neither, I got my Grandad to ask around at Cardiff (he lectures there) thy said the same as durham. It's also irrelevant as the Law A level is purely criminal (As to why I have to do it so I can do work experience isn't unclear, I also feel I would enjoy doing law). and I'm looking at doing either contract or european law degree.
    6-9 months of experience, obviously. But not the A-Level.
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    (Original post by ollie51)
    I'm going to take following subjects: Law, Economis, Medieval History and critical thinking. However I'm not sure on whether I should do an English (either Lit, lang or combined) or Chemistry (I consider Biology to impeccably boring and you have to do maths with physics. Hence the choice of chemistry. So the question is Chemistry or some for English.

    I'm interested in doing a law or history degree at university.
    OMGaawwwd you opened a bracket but didn't close it!!!
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    Critical Thinking and Law are both "less preferred" A-Levels. Clearly you wouldn't approach LSE or Oxbridge with such A-Levels.
    Critical Thinking would be a fifth AS so it wouldn't matter anyway.

    As for Law, he needs to do it in order to secure the work experience. Since this would ideally be a fourth A-level, it wouldn't matter much anyway as he'd have the other three strong A-levels under his belt.
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    6-9 months of experience, obviously. But not the A-Level.
    That's what I want to do. However it's not really an either or, and the advice was do It.
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    (Original post by ollie51)
    Although I don't think either of the above provide contract Law but I think warwick does.
    Based on what you said above it sounds as if Law, Economics, History and CHEMISTRY would be best. I have to say I agree as all my other options are essay based.
    If you are picking chemistry then very best of luck to you! It is quite hard, you need to revise for it often to get the best grade. I study chemistry and it's very enjoyable!
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    drop law and do both as someone suggested. or replace chemistry with maths.

    Seriously. Someone who can do Maths and English has just opened for themselves an unbelievable amount of doors. combined with History and Economics that you're planning you're pretty much set for life.
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    I hate maths. It's real main reason I dismissed the IB, that and the prospect of a language. I can live with maths when it's applied, for example in moles (do you do that in chemistry AS?, I'm doing it now)
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    if you pick chemistry, make sure you actually want to do it. many of my friends started it at the beginning of the year, but dropped out because they found it really hard, and didn't care about the subject enough to put in all the extra work (they all got A*s at GCSE btw).
    so by all means, take it if you enjoy it and want to do it, but be aware of the dangers of only taking it because you think you need it.
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    I really am struggling to come to a decsion here, the pros and cons almost negate one another but I think doing chemistry could allow me do show I'm adept and diverse in multiple areas. It would also make my lessons a little dissimilair.
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    Okay I just looked at my prospectus I am able to do Physics because Critical Thinking is only 2 periods a week I can do some maths additional study to allow me to do physics which is only two periods a week which I can live with. Taking physics will also show my mathmatical ability in an applied way; which is bareable to me, and slightly interesting.
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    (Original post by Fat-Love)
    drop law and do both as someone suggested. or replace chemistry with maths.

    Seriously. Someone who can do Maths and English has just opened for themselves an unbelievable amount of doors. combined with History and Economics that you're planning you're pretty much set for life.
    Precisely.
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    (Original post by Mr Inquisitive)
    *probably. I beg to differ.
    Chemistry is the hardest A level based on fact,

    There was some research into it, and a kind of index was made where Chemistry scored 0.96 making it the hardest A-level, and Lit scored 0.46 making it 3rd bottom.

    beg to differ with that......

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/ed...rs-857643.html

    P.s correcting spelling is so queer
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    (Original post by Dec S 92)
    P.s correcting spelling is so queer
    Using 'queer' as a synonym for a derogatory term is rather pathetic. You should go forth and extend your vocabulary a little, reprobate.
 
 
 
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