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Intelligence- Are Academic grades a measure of ones abilities? Watch

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    I dont know what school you are at, but most of the time the students who do academically well are the ones who end up being given zero attention because the school can already rely on them to do well and boost their scores.
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    TL;DR, but in answer to the thread title: no. Some people struggle with exams, and if you just happen to be having a bad day on exam day for whatever reason, you can completely mess up your grade etcetera.
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    In summary; usually.

    Smarter people usually get better grades. But not always, by any means, cause there are other factors. And not always in every area, so I think it's hard to get a measure of 'intelligence', you have to split it in to 'intelligence in science' etc. etc.
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    (Original post by EggmanD)
    In general i was calling IQ tests and exams useless lol
    If I get 10A*'s at GCSE, 5 As at A-Level, SS in STEP and get a 1st from Cambridge, but spend my life whacking off over porn, then yes it's useless. But intelligence isn't ever defined by how much you use it. There's the concept of not using one's intelligence. The idea is you actually have it, to waste.

    (Original post by EggmanD)
    Yes what im saying could be arrogant, but from my point of view limiting yourself in a small studio for a pittance is a moronic choice when you can limit yourself in a big digital company for more money.
    It's sound advice IMO, sure, but if his aim/motivations lie in the 'lesser' option then he's set on that. It's not because he can't see the merits of another option. If he hates the idea of working in a company, then it's hard to change that (for example). It's not because his brain doesn't understand that more money is to be made there. I'm sure he knows that 3x > x.

    (Original post by EggmanD)
    Now, do you;

    A) work in a studio like anyone else could for a living wage hardly using the skills you have and enjoy the setting but not the creative freedom or
    B) work in a job where your motivation is not as high and you dont enjoy it too much but with the skills you have you can earn double to 10x the amount of money and then save for your own studio where you set your own creative freedoms.

    The stupid choice is A. He is both impatient and foolish content being second best and ignoring his potential to succeed. Even if he is not interested in money and he is looking for the satisfaction of creation, B will give him a hundred times what A would.
    If you're motivated by money and status then you go for B, if you're motivated by self-creativity/freedom/setting then you opt for A. If you don't like working under people then you're likely to go for A. Even if you see the long term potential of Option B being converted to Option A later on, if you don't want to go through the process of B first due to apathy, then again he chooses A.

    My point is, it's not a question of not realising what's on offer, but merely choosing what he prefers. If for example he failed to see that he could make a lot of money via B and then convert to A later, then yes that's a deficiency on his part.
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    (Original post by Annoying-Mouse)
    No, they aren't. Maybe in TSR but in the real world only 1 in 4 entries - 26.7% - received the top grade (then A) at A level.
    Of course I was referring to it literally, NOT. I was referring to the record results as of late, didn't think I needed to explain it, but there.....:rolleyes:
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    (Original post by TWF)
    Of course I was referring to it literally, NOT. I was referring to the record results as of late, didn't think I needed to explain it, but there.....:rolleyes:
    Obviously, I know what you was referring to. But, it was to hyperbolic for my liking.
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    between people who purt in the same amotunt of effort, it is a measure of intellect with respect to a given subject. between people with the same intellect it is a measure of the amount of effort put into the work/tests.
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    (Original post by Annoying-Mouse)
    Obviously, I know what you was referring to. But, it was to hyperbolic for my liking.
    Pointless post.
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    (Original post by TWF)
    Pointless post.
    Ironic.
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    (Original post by Annoying-Mouse)
    Ironic.
    My post's point was to point out the pointlessness of your post. What was yours if you already knew what I meant?
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    i should poiint out that if you look at the grades y'all claim to get, it''s fairy obviosu that good academic grades are not evidential of intelligence.
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    Well. Yes. They are a measure, but not a full measure. Other factors that will affect ones grades are:

    Parental support
    Economic status, and hence, quality of school
    Quality of teaching

    However, cleverer children will tend to get better grades, so...
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    I don't think so. I know a lot of people who are generally intelligent, but they're just lazy and can't channel their capacity for thought into something productive. I tend to think it all comes down to their brain chemistry, or possibly environmental factors. I know I could've done better in school had I been mentored in some way about work ethics, or if my parents took an active interest in my education.

    Ultimately, I don't think there's any solid way of measuring one's intelligence in all respects.
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    Meh...
    I can't stand people who won't let go of the delusion they're good at a field/subject despite failing it. Just because you know some HTML and got a C in ICT at GCSE doesn't mean it's a failed system(an example I've heard from someone).
    I do think some people can get high grades in subjects that they're not particularly good at, esp. at GCSE level.
    I'd not even make academic qualifications a criteria when I wanted to assess someone as a potential friend. But as a potential applicant to an academic establishment? Obviously, it would be.
    TBH, I didn't really read all of your post but I think that's what you were getting at.
    EMZ=]
 
 
 
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