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Are ethnic minorities who use anglicised names sell outs? Watch

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    Yes
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    No
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    In some cases
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    15.38%

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    (Original post by effofex)
    How on earth can it be a sellout? I'm sure they are perfectly aware of their original names prior to Anglicization.

    I think Anglicization is a great idea as it may often help in maximising their probability of employment.
    Don't you see a problem with this? Names shouldn't be used to discriminate.
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    (Original post by Brutal Honesty)
    This applies to anyone of immigrant background who has a foreign sounding name and purposely uses an anglicised form of their name or uses a completely different English name instead. Barack Obama did it for a while, used the name "Barry" which people in college knew him as rather than his birth name. It is much more common in the US as you'll see a lot of Oriental/Asian as well as Arabs people adopt English first names (that may be because Americans find pronouncing foreign names a bit tricky) but it is quite common among some groups in the UK. It isn't uncommon for people of Nigerian background to use English names officially but be referred to by their African name among their family. What does everyone think though, are they ashamed of their culture or is this simply an effort to fit in with the rest of us? Is this a good thing or a bad thing?
    I've traced my ancestors back to about 1700 and found out I have French and German ancestry. The Germans came over in the 1870s and they anglicised their name to Ritchley from what I assume was something rather like Rietschel. I've no idea why they did this, but as you said, largely it is a way of fitting in and assimilating into society. You wouldn't like it if someone came to your house and re-arranged your furniture, so, with that very simplistic analogy in mind, that's probably what they were doing. They decided to move to a certain country and they've decided to adopt its culture; the correct thing to do, in my opinion.
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    I think its fine - If they don't want to use their ethnic name, then sure, use a British one. Not all people of ethnic minorities want to uphold family culture or be overly involved in it, I think by saying they are 'betraying their culture' you're constricting them to act in a way ruled by their ethnicity. People should be free to act and call themselves whatever they want, without feeling bad for being ashamed of their culture. Many people who're second or third + generation immigrants to the UK or USA fit in more with UK culture because they've not really had much to do with the culture of their parents/grandparents.

    As to taking English names, One of my Chinese friends has called herself Sophie ever since she moved to the UK because noone can pronounce her real Chinese name. However, I have two penfriends who live in China, and from what I gather over there its popular or 'cool' to give themselves anglican names.
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    It seems like most Chinese people I've met (the ones born here anyway) tend to have both an English and Chinese names. It's a good idea I think, it makes it easier to remember their names and it's not a case of selling out. I do think it's ridiculous when someone like James Caan uses that name though instead of their proper spelling.

    (Original post by Brutal Honesty)
    If you had to live in China for work or something would you adopt a Chinese name and keep with it so everyone only knew you by your Chinese name apart from your family? Isn't it taking away a massive part of your identity in an effort to fit in?
    These people all adopted Chinese names since they're living in China.

    Charlotte McInnis > Ai Hua
    http://www.cctv.com/program/upclose/...6/100732.shtml

    Mark Rowswell > Dashan
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dashan

    Uwechue Emmanuel > Hao Ge
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hao_Ge
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    If i moved to another country like china, i would probably use a name that sounds similar to my original one, but one that is usual in china. It would probably make things easier.
    Jackie Chan changed his name to jackie chan when he moved to america ithink
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    (Original post by asparkyn)
    Not really. A Korean boy came over to our class last year and insisted his name was Kane, after the wrestler. Well, he looked fit to be the part but his name definitely wasn't Kane :lol: Still, the name stuck and he became known as Kane till our graduation.

    Although not entirely related to this thread... in certain circumstances, ethnic minorities have no option but to formally anglicise/"localise" their name. The Chinese who settled in places like Indonesia had to change their names to make themselves sound more local. Tan became Tanuwidjaja, Chan became Tjandra and so forth. I myself don't have a Chinese name. I don't even have a surname listed on my passport, come to think of it :hmmm:
    lmao wtf
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    It's their name, I don't care.
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    (Original post by Brutal Honesty)
    This applies to anyone of immigrant background who has a foreign sounding name and purposely uses an anglicised form of their name or uses a completely different English name instead. Barack Obama did it for a while, used the name "Barry" which people in college knew him as rather than his birth name. It is much more common in the US as you'll see a lot of Oriental/Asian as well as Arabs people adopt English first names (that may be because Americans find pronouncing foreign names a bit tricky) but it is quite common among some groups in the UK. It isn't uncommon for people of Nigerian background to use English names officially but be referred to by their African name among their family. What does everyone think though, are they ashamed of their culture or is this simply an effort to fit in with the rest of us? Is this a good thing or a bad thing?
    Arabs don't. I know hundreds of Iraqis, not one anglicised their name. It is a source of mockery and contempt.

    Some Arab names sound English eg, Sarah, Adam.
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    I know a lot of Asians do it at my school, even if they have short, simple first names originally. Asian culture is largely influenced by the Western world and many of them want to live like Americans, so foreign names are "trendy" to them. They may do as they please, but it is ridiculous if people start talking about their ethnic origin as something very important or asks for others to adjust to them, simply because it suits them at that particular time. While most of the time they want to be someone else.
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    People put too much emphasis on heritage and origin. If someone with an immigrant background has lived in the UK their whole life, chances are they feel British. Then I think it's understandable that they would want a name that is associated with their home and culture.

    And then there's the pure inconvenience of mispronounciations. It's no fun when people have four different pronounciations of your name. I bet none of you would be able to pronounce my name properly on the first try. Also, people find it more difficult to remember foreign names and that creates problems and awkward moments.
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    (Original post by Brutal Honesty)
    Are ethnic minorities who use anglicised names sell outs?
    Are ethnic minorities who use English language sell outs?

    It's up to the individual concerned but honestly when you live in a country with a specific language, you have to make allowances for that.

    I wouldn't go to China without being able to speak Mandarin and if I thought I had a difficult name to pronounce I'd probably consider choosing a nickname that would be easier for the locals.


    So yeah, up to the individual.
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    (Original post by Dirac Delta Function)
    Arabs don't. I know hundreds of Iraqis, not one anglicised their name. It is a source of mockery and contempt.

    Some Arab names sound English eg, Sarah, Adam.
    What about Christian Levantines?
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    Nigel is a common choice in my experience.
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    (Original post by zxh800)
    Don't you see a problem with this? Names shouldn't be used to discriminate.
    Of course names shouldn't be used as a basis for discrimination, but in studies such as the one mentioned below, the practice is apparently widespread. Therefore it is best to hedge against such an occurrence.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2009...ent-undercover
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    (Original post by Mujeriego)
    What about Christian Levantines?
    they anglicise their names from Arabic versions. It's not just Levantines, some Iraqis do as well.
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    (Original post by effofex)
    Of course names shouldn't be used as a basis for discrimination, but in studies such as the one mentioned below, the practice is apparently widespread. Therefore it is best to hedge against such an occurrence.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/money/2009...ent-undercover
    True say, it's sad but it's reality. I guess i'll have to sell out and change my name to Joe Hansen (very twisted version of my real name)
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    (Original post by zxh800)
    True say, it's sad but it's reality. I guess i'll have to sell out and change my name to Joe Hansen (very twisted version of my real name)
    It may not be the case at larger multinational employers (where applications tend to be online and where you won't see details such as the name, address, gender etc. of the candidate and interview shortlists will be drawn up directly from the 'secondary education', 'higher education', 'work experience' 'awards' etc. categories) but it may be more prevalent in less multinational industries or employers outside the South-East.

    It's not as though your friends/family can't call you by your original name, and you can even request that your colleagues call you by your original name too after you have secured the position within their company.

    I'm not sure why it should be seen as 'selling out' - many foreign names have English equivalents:

    e.g. Francois - Francis; Piotr - Peter; Wilhelm - William; Fredrik - Fred; Alfredo - Alfred.

    And after hearing many Mandarin first names, most are in actual fact quite easy to pronounce if you listen well.
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    No. In Chinese, James is generally transliterated as Zhan Mu Shi (or Ya Ge).
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    (Original post by Dirac Delta Function)
    they anglicise their names from Arabic versions. It's not just Levantines, some Iraqis do as well.
    Ah OK. Nancy is an Arabic name? I'm basing this on my experience of watching Melody TV and Lebanese friends by the way. I thought it was some legacy from the French. Back in the day where this still flew at half-mast:


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    As an individual, you owe nothing to your heritage. It's not like you chose to be born under a certain background or to be given a certain name for the rest of your life. If someone wishes to be referred to as something other than what they're known as, then by all means. If you respect your background enough, this won't be an issue to you and you'll stick with whatever name you've been given in accordance with your family's lineage.
 
 
 
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