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    (Original post by greebo-man)
    I LOVE this. Do they actually use it!
    I think so. My Spanish teacher loves it.
    I only found it because I read the whole book for Spanish slangs :P
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    (Original post by Wanischa)
    I think so. My Spanish teacher loves it.
    I only found it because I read the whole book for Spanish slangs :P
    Shotgun using it! My fave idiom.
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    (Original post by Wanischa)
    My favourite phrases:

    Está en un calléjon sin sálida.
    Salir de Guatemala para entrar a Guatepeor.
    Está entre la espalda y la pared.
    No estoy persuadido/a de que sea el caso.
    Dudo que sea así.
    Es un tema que ya me interesa/preocupa desde hace algún tiempo.
    Tengo que confesarme.
    Could you tell me what these mean please?

    I don't really know any Spanish phrases. I like that they say 'Jesus' after someone sneezes though :p:
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    (Original post by S_123)
    Could you tell me what these mean please?

    I don't really know any Spanish phrases. I like that they say 'Jesus' after someone sneezes though :p:

    Está en un calléjon sin sálida. - To be in a place with no way out.
    Salir de Guatemala para entrar a Guatepeor. - To go from bad to worst.
    Está entre la espalda y la pared. - To be in between a rock and a hard place.
    No estoy persuadido/a de que sea el caso. - I'm not persuaded that that's the case.
    Dudo que sea así. - I doubt that it's like that.
    Es un tema que ya me interesa/preocupa desde hace algún tiempo. - It's a topic which has interest/worry me for some time.
    Tengo que confesarme. - I have to confess.

    (Original post by greebo-man)
    Shotgun using it! My fave idiom.
    How can you shotgun it when I've been using it first
    You can borrow it though.
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    (Original post by Wanischa)
    Está en un calléjon sin sálida. - To be in a place with no way out.
    Salir de Guatemala para entrar a Guatepeor. - To go from bad to worst.
    Está entre la espalda y la pared. - To be in between a rock and a hard place.
    No estoy persuadido/a de que sea el caso. - I'm not persuaded that that's the case.
    Dudo que sea así. - I doubt that it's like that.
    Es un tema que ya me interesa/preocupa desde hace algún tiempo. - It's a topic which has interest/worry me for some time.
    Tengo que confesarme. - I have to confess.


    How can you shotgun it when I've been using it first
    You can borrow it though.
    Thank you!!
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    (Original post by Wanischa)
    Está en un calléjon sin sálida. - To be in a place with no way out.
    Salir de Guatemala para entrar a Guatepeor. - To go from bad to worst.
    Está entre la espalda y la pared. - To be in between a rock and a hard place.
    No estoy persuadido/a de que sea el caso. - I'm not persuaded that that's the case.
    Dudo que sea así. - I doubt that it's like that.
    Es un tema que ya me interesa/preocupa desde hace algún tiempo. - It's a topic which has interest/worry me for some time.
    Tengo que confesarme. - I have to confess.


    How can you shotgun it when I've been using it first
    You can borrow it though.
    If you're gonna use south american idioms you'll have to write like they do meaning no more vosotros etc
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    (Original post by cuche)
    If you're gonna use south american idioms you'll have to write like they do meaning no more vosotros etc
    When writing essay, I don't use vosotros. I use ellos/él form.
    I have never mention using vosotros. I don't think I ever use vosotros....apart from when I lived in Spain :/
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    (Original post by watsoben)
    Se tiene que hacer hincapie en que - One has to emphasise that
    Vale agregar que - its worth adding that

    Por la otra cara de la moneda - the other side of the coin (idoim)
    Hi, could you tell me if you should use subjunctive after
    Se tiene que hacer hincapie en que?
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    I use "Que... + subj" quite often, especially in day-to-day conversation with friends.

    For example:

    ¡Que duermas bien! - Sleep well!
    ¡Que todo vaya bien! - I hope everything goes well!

    These phrases should really start with "Espero que...", but they often skip the "espero". This has certainly made my Spanish sound more natural, and is also a nice surprise in exams!

    It will be interesting to see what other people add to this thread; I'm always looking forward to expanding my subjunctive knowledge!
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    (Original post by samneal)
    I use "Que... + subj" quite often, especially in day-to-day conversation with friends.

    For example:

    ¡Que duermas bien! - Sleep well!
    ¡Que todo vaya bien! - I hope everything goes well!

    These phrases should really start with "Espero que...", but they often skip the "espero". This has certainly made my Spanish sound more natural, and is also a nice surprise in exams!

    It will be interesting to see what other people add to this thread; I'm always looking forward to expanding my subjunctive knowledge!
    I'm living in a host family in Spain and they just say "¡qué duermas!" before I go to bed, they don't even put the "bien" on the end.
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    (Original post by samneal)
    I use "Que... + subj" quite often, especially in day-to-day conversation with friends.

    For example:

    ¡Que duermas bien! - Sleep well!
    ¡Que todo vaya bien! - I hope everything goes well!

    These phrases should really start with "Espero que...", but they often skip the "espero". This has certainly made my Spanish sound more natural, and is also a nice surprise in exams!

    It will be interesting to see what other people add to this thread; I'm always looking forward to expanding my subjunctive knowledge!

    Just checking, the que in these exclamative expressions does take an accent on the e yeah?
    Dont worry about missing it out, I always do. accents are such a drag to type, i dont even know
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    (Original post by greebo-man)
    Just checking, the que in these exclamative expressions does take an accent on the e yeah?
    Dont worry about missing it out, I always do. accents are such a drag to type, i dont even know
    they do have an accent because of the exclamation mark
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    (Original post by cuche)
    they do have an accent because of the exclamation mark
    sweet, thought so.
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    (Original post by Wanischa)
    My favourite phrases:

    Está en un calléjon sin sálida.
    Salir de Guatemala para entrar a Guatepeor.
    Está entre la espalda y la pared.
    No estoy persuadido/a de que sea el caso.
    Dudo que sea así.
    Es un tema que ya me interesa/preocupa desde hace algún tiempo.
    Tengo que confesarme.
    Espada. Espalda means back (as in, the part of the body) the word for sword is espada.

    And yeah, people do use "salir de guatemala para entrar a guatepeor", it'd depend on where you're from though. It's not hugely popular here.
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    (Original post by triloko)
    Espada. Espalda means back (as in, the part of the body) the word for sword is espada.

    And yeah, people do use "salir de guatemala para entrar a guatepeor", it'd depend on where you're from though. It's not hugely popular here.
    True, it is, must have got confused with the Devil Backbone.
    Where is here?
    I think that phrase is more Latin American, which I was writing essay about Latin America.
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    (Original post by un-besito)
    I like 'Como si fuese lo único que importase' -as if it were the only thing that mattered
    and 'este sugiere que...' this suggests that...
    The first phrase should be "Como si fuese lo único que importa" and the second "Esto sugiere que" (this is technically correct, but it sounds very Spanglish).
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    (Original post by cuche)
    I'm living in a host family in Spain and they just say "¡qué duermas!" before I go to bed, they don't even put the "bien" on the end.
    Whereabouts in Spain was that? Sounds a bit naff to me, to omit the "bien"
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    (Original post by cuche)
    they do have an accent because of the exclamation mark
    No, it's not quite as simple as that. In "Que duermas bien", for example, "que" doesn't have an accent.
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    These are from the back of a bookmark I got from Lanzarote.

    Very Useful Phrases:

    El oso esta malo (the bear is bad)
    ?Por que el elefante esta rapido? (Why is the elephant quick)
    Come el billete, y el perro come la rueda (I am eating the ticket, and the dog is eating the wheel)
    Un puerco malo quiere un zapato (the bad pig wants a shoe)
    Una vaca roja come una ventana (a red cow eats a window)
    And so on.

    If these aren't useful then I don't know what is :L
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    (Original post by Wanischa)
    True, it is, must have got confused with the Devil Backbone.
    Where is here?
    I think that phrase is more Latin American, which I was writing essay about Latin America.
    "here" is Uruguay, but Spanish varies A LOT between countries in South America. Buenos Aires and the whole or most of Uruguay speak a very similar "dialect" so to say, whereas the rest of South America (even going a couple of hours out of Buenos Aires) is completely different to us.

    don't get me wrong the phrase is perfectly fine, and I've heard it here a few times, but it's not the most common around here. it's probably something more northern I guess, but I can't say it with any degree of certainty



    (Original post by battycatlady)
    These are from the back of a bookmark I got from Lanzarote.

    Very Useful Phrases:

    El oso esta malo (the bear is bad)
    ?Por que el elefante esta rapido? (Why is the elephant quick)
    Come el billete, y el perro come la rueda (I am eating the ticket, and the dog is eating the wheel)
    Un puerco malo quiere un zapato (the bad pig wants a shoe)
    Una vaca roja come una ventana (a red cow eats a window)
    And so on.

    If these aren't useful then I don't know what is :L
    I have never heard of those in my life to be honest, but they may be Spanish. they don't make any sense here though, sorry I cant help you on that one!
 
 
 
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