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What degree is the best for job prospects? Watch

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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    doubt it, why the **** would you do that with a law degree.
    with history, you can go into accountancy, barrister / solicitor, teacher. banker, manager, business person, historiuan, media, consultancy ... so on. history is a well respectable subject. you can do the same things with law

    ps i have family who have done a degree in law and a few in history/politics and have gone into becoming a solicitor, project manager and accountanc.
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    forgive me about the spelling getting used to this new keyboard lol
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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    What skills have I gained?


    • a talent for clear expression, both oral and written;

    • putting forward ideas and arguments in a concise manner;

    • gathering, investigating and assessing material;

    • basing conclusions on research and generating ideas;

    • organising material in a logical and coherent way.



    Ow wait, you get that from most degrees.
    I love how you ignore the job prospects, the whole point of my posting the links to you.
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    exactly you can gain those skills from most degrees, though the person you are, the people who taught you and the way you retain and pratice that knowledge will make your degree count....
    and lets face it getting a degree from oxbridge, russell group, golden triangle or redbrick will put you in a better position when it comes to employemnt, not always, but does.



    peace out
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    So far I've only seen 1 mention of Language degrees. I've been told so many times that they offer good job prospects. True?

    Not that it changed my mind on what I wanted to study, always been my passion. In the end, if you choose a degree that you hate just because of the job prospects then the chances are you're not going to do well. Therefore making it more difficult to find a job. Go for what you love
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    Degree in Funeral Services ??? The customer base is quite firm.
    • Political Ambassador
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    Would't bother me going on to a starting salary of 19k.
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    I'd imagine that statistically speaking, the answer would be Medicine, since close to 100% of graduates get jobs immediately - the only ones that don't are those who choose not to. And that's regardless of which medical school you attended. I don't think any other subject could make that claim
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    Radiography
    Pharmacy
    Occupational thrapy
    Medicen
    Optemetry
    Orthoptics
    Dentistry


    with those degrees you are guranteed for a job when you graduate
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    David Beckham studies.I wonder if the guy is educated but he is a good english footballer.
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    In terms of graduate employment % - medicine and dentistry.
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    I'd say Computer Science.

    You haven't even got to graduate to become wealthy. Look at Mark Zuckerberg. He dropped out of Harvard and built Facebook and is now worth just under $7bn.

    Also every industry in the world is adapting computers to the way they go about things. Even if you can't get employed you can become a freelance programmer, freelance web designer, build cheap custom systems and sell them below RRP price so you may a profit whilst undercutting the big companies

    Computer Science and IT has made a lot of young people rich. Once you know a few languages then the possibilities are endless. The only restriction is your imagination.

    Computers are also going to be a part of the future for years and years to come and the more computers have an effect on the way we do things the more jobs there are going to be in fields associated with computing.
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    (Original post by SPMS)
    If you're a girl.. I'll be hated for this.. Sandwich Studies? :cool:
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    Science's or something which allows you to go into to finance, medicine, or some form of engineering as those jobs are always needed and very well paid.
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    University Studies
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    (Original post by Focus08)
    In our service-based economy, something like law/economics
    I like how you put that.
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    (Original post by jb9191)
    I'd say Computer Science.

    You haven't even got to graduate to become wealthy. Look at Mark Zuckerberg. He dropped out of Harvard and built Facebook and is now worth just under $7bn.

    Also every industry in the world is adapting computers to the way they go about things. Even if you can't get employed you can become a freelance programmer, freelance web designer, build cheap custom systems and sell them below RRP price so you may a profit whilst undercutting the big companies

    Computer Science and IT has made a lot of young people rich. Once you know a few languages then the possibilities are endless. The only restriction is your imagination.

    Computers are also going to be a part of the future for years and years to come and the more computers have an effect on the way we do things the more jobs there are going to be in fields associated with computing.
    It's still something that can be very easily outsourced to China or India though, right?
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    (Original post by Inkerman)
    It's still something that can be very easily outsourced to China or India though, right?
    Yes but they are mainly call centre jobs and not actual full on programming jobs.

    The main jobs are still based in the UK or US.

    Outsourcing call centre jobs is easy as anyone can realistically do them as they are taught what to do on being employed and the local Indian or Chinese population can do them.

    A full programmer who is fluent in many languages or specifically specialised in a certain language is still worth a lot in the UK and the US. Even so you could set up your own business and provide a vast number of IT services ranging from custom computer building to web design.

    You could even take up web design in another country and still provide your services for people all over the world and communicate via the internet or phone. Skype is normally used by such businesses as Skype to Skype is free

    Also, if you eventually go on to do law you can become a patent lawyer and that is a job thats in high demand as law within IT is a very 'edgy' piece of legislation. People are always claiming they were the creators of something rather than someone else and 9/10 it ends up in a lawsuit. People claiming they made programs or websites (facebook is a perfect example) and therefore try and sue the person who actually made it. Thats why the demand for patent lawyers with a background in Computer Science is growing. You might not even have to do law, you just need a company to give you a chance and you need to know the law regarding computing.

    In the US, Computer Science is the 11th best degree you can obtain. It opens you up to wide variety of jobs.

    Also, remember that it depends on the individual skills you have learnt and how valuable they are to employers. Thats why when considering a Computer Science degree you should research what employers want from Computer Scientists and then choose the modules that are most required. Its all about planning.
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    (Original post by razzmatazz rach)
    Allied Health profession degrees.

    Speech and Language Therapy
    Occupational Therapy
    Diagnostic Radiography
    Therapeutic Radiography
    Physiotherapy (Not that many job opportunities for this recently as it became a very common degree)
    optometry

    These degrees all lead to jobs and the course is funded by the NHS (well it is now, not sure about in the future with the funding issues) They are very specific degrees but often have related Masters degree which can expand and develop the career.
    Don't know about the others, but can say that optometry is definitely not funded by the NHS, the reason beind that being that most optometrists don't work within the NHS.
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    Hi there,
    Have you heard about the Ernst & Young Degree in Accounting and Finance? The degree in Accounting, Auditing and Finance is available in partnership with Lancaster University Management School (LUMS), a world-ranked international management school, and The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Scotland (ICAS), the world’s first professional body of accountants. The Ernst & Young Degree combines the best of student life with challenging and practical opportunities in the workplace, helping you to move onto a career that uses your distinctive abilities to the full.
    As well as earning an internationally recognised BSc Honours qualification, you will complete 18 months of paid work experience and potential exemptions from a number of ICAS exams. And if you get a 2.1, pass your professional exams and excel during your work placements, you will receive a graduate job offer from one of the most prestigious professional services firms in the world – something that in the current economic climate is becoming increasingly harder for today’s graduates.
 
 
 
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